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The Complete Wimmen's Comix

$100.00
✔ In print
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In the late ’60s, underground comix changed the way comics readers saw the medium — but there was an important pronoun missing from the revolution. In 1972, ten women cartoonists got together in San Francisco to rectify the situation and produce the first and longest-lasting all-woman comics anthology, Wimmen’s Comix. Within two years the Wimmen’s Comix Collective had introduced cartoonists like Roberta Gregory and Melinda Gebbie to the comics-reading public, and would go on to publish some of the most talented women cartoonists in America — Carol Tyler, Mary Fleener, Aline Kominsky-Crumb, Dori Seda, Phoebe Gloeckner, and many others. In its twenty-year run, the women of Wimmen’s tackled subjects the guys wouldn’t touch with a ten-foot pole: abortion, menstruation, masturbation, castration, lesbians, witches, murderesses, and feminists.

Most issues of Wimmen’s Comix have been long out of print, so it’s about time these pioneering cartoonists’ work received their due. Presented as a gorgeous two-volume slipcased set, The Complete Wimmen’s Comix includes the ground-breaking 1970 one-shot, It Ain’t Me, Babe, the very first all-woman comic book ever published. Edited with an introduction by Trina Robbins. 

Pages:
728
Colors:
black & white
Format:
Hardcover
Dimensions:
8 1⁄8” x 10 1⁄4”
ISBN-13:
978-1-60699-898-4
Year:
2016

“Launched during the heyday of women’s liberation, Wimmen’s Comix sustained the in-your-face, rebellious spirit of the 1960s social and sexual revolutions throughout its run. Contributors — most of the famous women cartoonists of an entire generation — were more explicit about sex, in word and image, than any of the male undergrounders … Their scripts, regardless of genre, are chock-full of sass about women’s issues and male obliviousness and general cluelessness, not to mention outright oppression. As definitely essential as it is definitely not for children.”  Booklist

“Wimmen’s Comix should take its share of the credit for nurturing so many now-celebrated women comix artists who have eased the genre out of the underground and into the mainstream of comics and graphic novels — and for providing a lot of raucous laughs to themselves. This publication is a very welcome addition to the feminist media archive and a rich resource for further research and study.” — NY Journal of Books

The whole bulky thing feels like a suitcase bomb packed with jagged hunks of social revolution. And that energy keeps sparking throughout the 704 pages of this frenetic, anarchic, occasionally kamikaze production.  NPR

“There’s history and fantasy, masturbation and menstruation, work and sex, food and drugs, witches and lesbians, superheroines and feminists.” — Huffington Post

The Complete Wimmen’s Comix is simply one of the most beautiful books I’ve ever seen. I’m proud just to hold it in my hands; I’m proud just to have it on my bookshelf. It’s the crown jewel of my comics collection. It’s giant and gorgeous. — Autostraddle

These comics by and about women responded to the spirit of their times, provided outlets for some extraordinary talent, and stood as counterpoint to historical male dominance in both mainstream and alternative comics.”  Comics Beat

Whether enjoyed as cultural artifacts, period pieces, or simply as comic books, these Comix continue to be an accomplishment worth celebrating.   Under the Radar

 

In the late ’60s, underground comix changed the way comics readers saw the medium — but there was an important pronoun missing from the revolution. In 1972, ten women cartoonists got together in San Francisco to rectify the situation and produce the first and longest-lasting all-woman comics anthology, Wimmen’s Comix. Within two years the Wimmen’s Comix Collective had introduced cartoonists like Roberta Gregory and Melinda Gebbie to the comics-reading public, and would go on to publish some of the most talented women cartoonists in America — Carol Tyler, Mary Fleener, Aline Kominsky-Crumb, Dori Seda, Phoebe Gloeckner, and many others. In its twenty-year run, the women of Wimmen’s tackled subjects the guys wouldn’t touch with a ten-foot pole: abortion, menstruation, masturbation, castration, lesbians, witches, murderesses, and feminists.

Most issues of Wimmen’s Comix have been long out of print, so it’s about time these pioneering cartoonists’ work received their due. Presented as a gorgeous two-volume slipcased set, The Complete Wimmen’s Comix includes the ground-breaking 1970 one-shot, It Ain’t Me, Babe, the very first all-woman comic book ever published. Edited with an introduction by Trina Robbins. 

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