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How to Be Happy
How to Be Happy
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Walt Disney's Mickey Mouse Vol. 5: Outwits the Phantom Blot [U.S./CANADA ONLY]
Walt Disney's Mickey Mouse Vol. 5: Outwits the Phantom Blot [U.S./CANADA ONLY]
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Special Exits [Softcover Ed.]
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Prince Valiant Vol. 9: 1953-1954
Prince Valiant Vol. 9: 1953-1954
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Comic Book Confidential!
Written by Eric Reynolds | Filed under videoevents 18 Apr 2008 1:16 PM

I attended David Hajdu's excellent event at Town Hall last night, which featured (or so I gathered) a significantly different lecture from those given on the rest of his book tour. The lecture was to promote The 10 Cent Plague, Hajdu's excellent history of the crackdown on horror and crime comics of the 1950s, which promoted the Kefauver Senate Subcommittee hearings on juvenile deliquency and led to the formation of the Comics Code Authority.

This event was put on by Nextbook, a non-profit organization that serves as a locus for Jewish literature, culture, and ideas; as such, Hajdu tailored his Town Hall event to how the creators of the era of The 10 Cent Plague employed comics to express their Jewish experience. For the evening's talk, Hajdu culled exclusively from interviews he conducted for the book that discussed Jewish identity but didn't make it into the final draft. So it was a night of bonus tracks, basically, which was great. He shared anecdotes from Will Eisner, Al Jaffee, Bob Oksner, Arnold Drake, Harry Lampert, Al Feldstein and many others.

But the highlight was a rare film short Hajdu was generous enough to share, a piece of propaganda he obtained from the Library of Congress and filmed in the 1950s to promote the idea that comic books cause juvenile deliquency. Specifically (but not limited to), torture. I wish I could have shot the whole clip, but my digital camera can only film for about two minutes before running out of space.

The film only gets better after these first two minutes, which are mostly introductory. It later becomes a dramatization of a group of suburban adolescents, all boys, happily hanging out in the woods, reading and trading comic books. The voice-over paints a more grim picture (I'm paraphrasing):

"Look at these children. When I was a boy, we too gathered in gangs like this, but it was to roast potatoes or learn skills and build things, like a raft to put in the river. Never did we just sit around READING. And what are they reading?"

Well, you can imagine. Tales of "sexual depravity, adultery, murder, etc." The sheer trauma of reading such pernicious filth turns the boys into a raving mob of sadists who con a younger boy into the woods, tie him to a tree, gag him, hold lit matches centimeters from his head and hair while slapping him around and punching knives into the tree he's bound to, and laughing in a way that makes me think Heath Ledger might have studied this film as research for the new Batman movie. It was like A Clockwork Orange starring the Little Rascals.

Which is to say it was fantastic. I almost bought into it, it was so good. I might have thought going in that knives and matches contributed more to juvenile delinquency than comics, but screw that notion.

Anyway, here's the clip. Thanks much to Mr. Hajdu for sharing with us. Buy his book (even though we didn't even publish it), it's good. It even has a killer Charles Burns cover. Now excuse me, I need to go roast some potatoes.

Ray Fenwick's HOBK special edition
Written by Eric Reynolds | Filed under Ray Fenwick 18 Apr 2008 10:52 AM

Tiny Showcase has just announced a special, signed edition of Ray Fenwick's amazing Hall of Best Knowledge. Every single copy of Ray Fenwick's Hall of Best Knowledge preordered through Tiny Showcase will be signed by Ray.

Each copy of the book comes packaged with a set of 10 bookplates, designed by Ray, for a low price of $26. The 3" by 4" bookplates are gum-backed, ready to apply to your most prized novels, textbooks, zines, and survival guides. The 10 bookplates come packaged in a foil-stamped library due date pocket.

This is a very special signed preorder, so we should tell you that yes, the quantities are limited. Tiny Showcase will stop taking orders for signed copies on Tuesday morning, April 22. So get on it already.

What the critics are saying: 

"This is a life-passage story that reveals itself as such so slyly that the joy and loving humilty it evokes at the end are breathtaking." Ray Olson, Booklist

"Fenwick has taken a high-brow route to the art of comedy. Hall of Best Knowledge is several things rolled into one: a bizarre self-help book; an eccentric college text; a guide to life from the unlikeliest of guides. It's hard to categorize (typographical novel? graphic metafiction?), even harder to explain." Mark Medley, National Post

"In addition to a neat bit of ventriloquism, Fenwick shows off dazzling visual originality in his eye-spinning use of pattern and lettering in Hall of Best Knowledge... The lettering melds with its environment as surely as letters in an illuminated manuscript blend with their angels and acanthus leaves." PRINT

 

Francoise Mouly & Jonathan Bennett
Written by Eric Reynolds | Filed under Untagged  18 Apr 2008 10:50 AM

I enjoyed this candid interview with the legendary Francoise Mouly about her new Toon Books line for little kiddies (and which are beautifully designed by MOME's Jonathan Bennett, which is why Jonathan has missed the last few issues). I particularly enjoyed this part:

MOULY: "'If you really want to work for us,' says the head of Scholastic, 'You could help us do the comic book version of Shrek 2.'" (laughs)

Q: And of course you jumped at that.

A: You have Art Spiegelman and Francoise Mouly in your office and they're begging to be in your employ so of course you find them the perfect thing. The comic book adaptation of the movie which is a sequel of an adaptation of a book by a cartoonist? Yes, of course, we're going to jump on that.

Too rich. 

MATS!? at SHQ in Los Angeles
Written by Jacob Covey | Filed under art shows 18 Apr 2008 10:21 AM

traveltimespace.jpg

Look what our pals at SHQ have for you tonight.

Tonight in NY!
Written by Eric Reynolds | Filed under Paul KarasikMark Newgardenevents 18 Apr 2008 10:09 AM

Desert Island's first event! 

I hearbye ban myself from Virgin Comics events
Written by Eric Reynolds | Filed under miscellany 18 Apr 2008 10:05 AM
Virgin Comics = Classy!  
Sketchbook #20
Written by Eric Reynolds | Filed under art 18 Apr 2008 9:57 AM

Courtesy Mat Brinkman:

  

 

Heroes & Villians at CHG this Tuesday
Written by Jacob Covey | Filed under miscellanyJordan Crane 17 Apr 2008 7:49 PM

crane.jpg

Heroes & Villians is a photo series by Tatiana Wills and Roman Cho that "features intimate portraits of the most notable emerging and established figures in the Pop Surrealist, Graffiti and Alt-Comic Book worlds."

I would contest their designation of THE most notable but it is cool to see them documenting SOME of the most notable artists working. Pictured above is the enchanting Jordan Crane. Visit Cho's site for a peek at more comics folks like Anders Nilsen, Johnny Ryan, Sammy Harkham, Souther Salazar, Ron Rege, Jr., and Steven Weissman.

UPDATE: I failed to mention that the show is 2 days only, opening this Tuesday at Corey Helford Gallery .

Steal This Book.
Written by Jacob Covey | Filed under miscellany 17 Apr 2008 3:18 PM

In the history of plagiarism, this pretty much takes the cake of egregiousness. An art book that lifted all of its contents off the internet and includes it on a CD (original internet file names intact, no less). That fact coupled with the title "Colorful Illustrations" makes this appear to be a clip art book, with the impression that all the art is copyright free, which it isn't. It's made by hard-working artists who didn't even know about the book.

tmpe.jpgIt is a Hong Kong publisher and if you've ever made art, you may be in the book.

I first learned of it from artist Mike Egan whose work was lifted (although appears to have at least (and curiously) been credited in the book). A lot of interviews in the book were lifted from the Little Chimp Society and they have more info on the book HERE.

...Of course, all of this raises every question you can possibly have about the relevance of copyright in the digital era of a global society but in any case: PLEASE DO NOT BUY THIS BOOK.

Sketchbook #19
Written by Eric Reynolds | Filed under Josh Simmonsart 17 Apr 2008 11:54 AM

Me 'n' my bitches, by Josh Simmons