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Daily links: 3/13/09
Written by Mike Baehr | Filed under Zak SallyMort WalkerMomeLilli CarréJerry DumasFantagraphics BookstoreDash ShawDame DarcyCraig YoeBoody Rogers 13 Mar 2009 1:16 PM

• Review: The A.V. Club "Comics Panel" likes Mome Vol. 14, saying of two featured stories, "Both [Dash Shaw and Lilli Carré] combine striking illustration with a nuanced sense of place and character for a winning mix of the classic and the progressive."

• Review: At the same link, The A.V. Club "Comics Panel" finds Boody. The Bizarre Comics of Boody Rogers "wild" and says the stories "read like uneasy fever dreams punctuated by cornpone gags. They aren’t funny ha-ha or funny strange, they’re funny with a touch of madness."

• Review: Italian site Il Sole 24 Ore says our collection of Mort Walker & Jerry Dumas's Sam's Strip is "exceptional... As always, the presentation of Fantagraphics is superb and worth sharing," according to the Google translation

• Profile: Gurldoggie spotlights Dame Darcy in anticipation of her appearance at our store tomorrow night

• Interview: Video blog 3-Minute Egg talks to Zak Sally at the MOMEntum exhibit opening at MCAD last weekend

• Interview: Newsarama talks to editor Craig Yoe about Boody

• Things to see: The Fabuleous Fifties presents a nice selection of uncollected Sparky Watts newspaper strips by Boody Rogers

Jason's Low Moon
Written by Jacob Covey | Filed under Jason 13 Mar 2009 11:51 AM

Another great book that we have going to press this week, Low Moon collects the titular New York Times Magazine "Funny Pages" story but that's not even the half of it. In fact, it's about 1/5 of it as you can see from the Table of Contents below. This hefty book is the first hardcover collection of Jason work (for the U.S. anyway) and I think the back cover quote says it all.

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Tardi Part V: Then What?
Written by Kim Thompson | Filed under previewsJacques Tardi 13 Mar 2009 7:42 AM
Okay, so there you have it. This summer we are releasing two Tardi graphic novels, You Are There and West Coast Blues. Next summer, It Was the War of the Trenches.

Should these find favor with the fickle American public, I plan to keep on translating and publishing Tardi books, working my way through the Nestor Burma books, the Adèle Blanc-Sec books, and all the one-shots, until, as with Jason, American readers will be able to enjoy the entire oeuvre of one of comics' grandmasters.

If not, if we crash and burn, we'll still have made available three masterpieces of modern Eurocomics, and it'll be up to the next Tardi fan turned publisher to take another running leap at this hard-to-crack marketplace — following in the now well-worn path created by Art Spiegelman and Françoise Mouly, Terry Nantier of NBM, Mike Richardson of Dark Horse Comics, Chris Oliveros, the late Byron Preiss of iBooks, and now Gary Groth and me. We love Tardi and we want you to love him too. When you see his books on the bookshelf in a few months, take a chance. You won't regret it, I promise.

And here, to whet your appetite, the first five pages of You Are There. The typesetting isn't quite right yet, we haven't gotten the effects lettering done, but basically, there you have it.

(Click each page below for a larger version, or click here to download the whole preview as a 480 KB PDF file.)

Jacques Tardi - You Are There - preview image

Jacques Tardi - You Are There - preview image

Jacques Tardi - You Are There - preview image

Jacques Tardi - You Are There - preview image

Jacques Tardi - You Are There - preview image

Gushing for Hanks
Written by Jacob Covey | Filed under Fletcher Hanks 12 Mar 2009 6:26 PM

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I'm just finally seeing all the content for our second collection of Fletcher Hanks comics and if anyone doubts the need for a second collection I am here to say YES. YES, THE WORLD NEEDS ACCESS TO EVERYTHING HANKS DID. This is pure joy to me. The impassioned competence of the drawings and their gorgeous flatness. The fate-ridden inevitability of everything that is happening everywhere in the universe. The horror, the slapstick, the compulsiveness of his work mapping out the very wiring of his chemistry's miserable imagination. 

Paul Karasik has written a great introduction this time around and he is a wonderful man for somehow managing to hunt down all of these stories. On behalf of the fans, special thanks go to the collectors who provided material from the ultra-rare comics these stories appeared in!

First look: Delphine #4 by Richard Sala
Written by Mike Baehr | Filed under Richard Salapreviews 12 Mar 2009 5:10 PM

Delphine #4 by Richard Sala

Ooo-wee! Richard Sala posted this cover art for the 4th issue of his Ignatz series Delphine on his MySpace page yesterday. Kim's not here so I can't tell you when the issue's coming out... this summer, I'm guessing. I'll update tomorrow when I find out because I wanna know too (or maybe Kim will leave a comment), but I couldn't wait to share this.

Now in stock: Drinky Crow's Maakies Treasury by Tony Millionaire
Written by Mike Baehr | Filed under Tony Millionairenew releases 12 Mar 2009 4:12 PM

Drinky Crow's Maakies Treasury by Tony Millionaire

Drinky Crow's Maakies Treasury
By Tony Millionaire

Tony Millionaire's Maakies is one of the best and most popular weekly comic strips in America, running in over a dozen of the largest U.S. weekly newspapers including the Village Voice, L.A. Weekly and Seattle's The Stranger. The strip has also been adapted into the hit animated series The Drinky Crow Show on the Cartoon Network's popular Adult Swim. Designed by publishing's foremost graphic designer, Chip Kidd, Drinky Crow's Maakies Treasury collects the second five years of the strip (previously reprinted in the volumes When We Were Very Maakies, The House at Maakies Corner and Der Struwwelmaakies) in a beautiful, deluxe, landscape hardcover format that complements the strip's elegant and classical style.

Maakies features the comical high-seas adventures of a booze-soaked corvid (Drinky Crow) and his equally-soused simian pal (Uncle Gabby), blending vaudeville-style humor and a breathtaking line that hearkens back to the glory days of the American comic strip. The twosome also sometimes makes room for their stuffed-toy alter egos, a clockwork alligator, various other land-, air-, and sea-borne fauna, the Author and his Editor, the heavens, architecture, and occasional guest strips (by Kaz, Renee French, Eric Reynolds and others) and fumetti.

Maakies suggests a contemporary collaboration between E.C. Segar, creator of Popeye, and seafaring novelist Patrick O'Brian (Master and Commander). Millionaire has won multiple Harvey and Eisner Awards and is also the creator of the popular Sock Monkey and Billy Hazelnuts books.

272-page black & white 12” x 5” hardcover • $29.99
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Daily links: 3/12/09
Written by Mike Baehr | Filed under previewsMichael KuppermanJohnny RyanJim WoodringGilbert HernandezEsther Pearl WatsonEros ComixDash Shaw 12 Mar 2009 2:57 PM

• Review: Dutch blog Koen says of Dash Shaw's Bottomless Belly Button (according to the Google translation) that "Shaw proves himself a master of the portrayal of inner pain and dysfunctional relationships without being depressing, with the addition of humor and mystery... This book is one of the best comics of 2008."

• Preview: Introducing an exlusive 7-page excerpt from Unlovable Vol. 1 by Esther Pearl Watson, New York Magazine says "Tammy [Pierce]'s hopes, dreams, and humiliations are brought vividly to life in Watson's grotesque-but-touching book Unlovable. Even if you never wore leg warmers with high heels, you'll still recognize your teenage self in Tammy Pierce's unguarded, most secret thoughts. And if you did wear leg warmers with heels, well, maybe this was your diary."

• Blurb: Italian blog Nuvole Parlanti, looking at Birdland, calls Gilbert Hernandez "the king of American erotic comics"

• Things to see: A status update on the upcoming Tales Designed to Thrizzle book from Michael Kupperman

• Things to see: Racist Colon: The Movie is the latest Johnny Ryan fan film

• Things to see: Jim Woodring, bad student

Wolverine Fellatio SUCCESS
Written by Eric Reynolds | Filed under misc 12 Mar 2009 1:23 PM

Failure is in the eye (mouth?) of the beholder. From the always awesome failblog

MOMEntum Report
Written by Eric Reynolds | Filed under Zak SallyTom KaczynskiNate NealMome 12 Mar 2009 10:39 AM

momentumlogo.png

Above: Me with my trusty MOMEntum tour guide. "And here we have the work of French master, David B." 

So this past weekend I had the extreme good fortune of visiting the great city of Minneapolis for the opening of MOMEntum, a retrospective exhibition of the first 15 issues of MOME at the Minneapolis College of Art & Design. The exhibition was the brainchild of MOME contributor and MCAD faculty member Zak Sally and his colleague, Barbara Schulz, who invited me to curate an exhibition of what I considered to be the cream of MOME's crop. Here's some scenes from the show:

MOMEntumOPEN.jpg

MCADfoyer.jpg

MCAD2.jpgMCAD3.jpg
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The show was a raging success and I spent all of Friday at MCAD engaged in a variety of activities. We started the day with lunch and a quick tour of the facilities, including a look at both the MOME show and a student show that was also opening that night. I was immediately struck by the high level of craft that permeated all of the student work - clearly the students were learning something at MCAD. None of the most common (and easiest to avoid) mistakes that young cartoonists make in comics - poor lettering, unclear panel-to-panel transitions, lazy panel bordering, etc. - were on display. There was a fundamental clarity to all of the work that you rarely see in the work of 20-year-olds. I was impressed from the get-go, and only moreso as the day went on. 

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In the afternoon, I gave a powerpoint lecture to the students. This was the most challenging part of the trip for me; I'd never spoken to such a large captive audience of young cartoonists and wasn't sure what to expect. I talked about how much the landscape has changed for aspiring cartoonists entering the professional world from when I began working in comics professionally about 15 years ago, for better and for worse, and how I saw MOME fitting into that landscape. It was a potentially unseemly blend of art and commerce that seemed to go over fairly well, or so everyone told me. I have no doubt that even if I had dropped my drawers and did my business on stage, these kind-hearted Midwesterners would have still complimented me and thanked me for my time.

After the lecture, I sat in on one of Barbara Schulz's afternoon comics classes and did an impromptu portfolio review... for three hours. To be honest, this could have been the most grueling, painful thing I've ever done in my life if not for the fact that, hey, these kids aren't bad at all. Giving a face-to-face portfolio review is incredibly awkward if you have nothing sincerely constructive to say. So it was not without some apprehension that I waded into the first review. But by the end, I was cruising, these kids made my job easy. None were perfect, but all had something uniquely going for them that was easy to sink my teeth into and use as a springboard for a larger conversation about strengths and weaknesses. I think I got as much out of it as they did.

I've always been a bit cynical about the ability to teach comics. But in the wake of schools like CCSSCAD, and MCAD, and coming out of last weekend, I am fully prepared to admit that this might be my own cross to bear having come from a time when there were virtually no accredited academic institutions that acknowledged comics as an artform or anything other than a strange bastard child of the illustration field. Yet here at MCAD, I had fine art professors coming up to me and thanking me for putting the show together and telling me how excited they were to talk about the work with their students. I'm not sure anyone under the age of 30 can appreciate how unusual it would have been throughout much of the last century for a Fine Art department at a serious art school to treat comics as a legitimate form of expression, what with all of that nasty representational imagery getting in the way of pure-hearted, abstract expressionism. Yet here I was, in Minneapolis, a guest of the school and being asked to do just that.

Kaczynskis.jpgSallys.jpg

The MOME show opening that night was a blast. MOME contributors Tom Kaczynski (pictured above with his mother!), Zak Sally (pictured above with his son and father -- it was a family affair!) and Nathan Neal were all in attendance, as was most of the Minneapolis comics scene, including Will DinskiSarah MoreanBrett Von Schlosser, and the notorious Mr. Mike, Mayor of Mt. Holly, MN. After the event, a bunch of us (including our old pal Eric Lorberer, proprietor of the excellent book review, Rain Taxi) headed over to the great Big Brain Comics to get our geek on and rendezvous with proprietor Michael Drivas. Big Brain is, hands-down, one of the finest comic shops I've ever been to, and my only regret is that I visited it after spending 11 exhausting hours at MCAD. I was literally too tired to shop, coveting beer and food more than comics by that point, although I still managed to almost unconsciously bring a small pile of goods to the counter, including the latest issue of Found magazine, which I literally had gone to about six different locations in Seattle to search out, only to find in about 30 seconds within Big Brain. Every city in America needs a Michael Drivas.

After Big Brain, we headed next door to Grumpy's, the Minneapolis institution owned by longtime friend of Fanta Tom Hazelmeyer, also the founder of Amphetamine Reptile records and perhaps better known to old school comic fans as the guy that made all of those cartoonist Zippo lighters back in the 1990s. The beer flowed and by the end of the night, even this urbane, sophisticated group of serious ah-teests were reduced to talking about -- what else? -- the Watchmen movie, of course, even though none of us had seen it. But this was not before Tom K and I made our case to Zak Sally and (I think) persuaded him to go rent the one, true great genre film classic of the last decade-plus: Starship Troopers.

And with thoughts of art comics and Paul Verhoeven still racing through my brain, I called it a day.

Saturday was our day to sightsee, and we spent the first half of the day at the Walker Art Center. We lucked out and happened to hit the museum on Free First Saturday, where this Sara Varon display greeted us right inside the front door:

Varon.jpg

I'll leave my critique of the Walker for another time. I liked some of it, disliked a lot of it. There's something wrong when the Lichtenstein starts looking better and better as the day wears on (and if you didn't think that was possible, try again after looking at one serious portrait of Kurt Cobain after another for an hour), while other installations made me think I'd inadvertently taken a left turn into an Ikea. I know, I am a sad dilettante who believes comics should be respected. That said, I found the Joseph Beuys exhibition surprisingly affecting and beautiful, totally contrary to what I expected going in, and would have loved to have absorbed more of it if not for the fact that my eight-month-old daughter really liked the acoustics in that room, necessitating a hasty exit. While waiting for an elevator, I noticed this peculiar typo in a stairwell:

YoeAreHer.jpg

Is the modern art world turning into the Modern Arf world? Speaking of which, one of my favorite parts of the Walker was actually the gift/book shop, where I was pleased to see Fantagraphics well-represented. It was particularly cool to see Jacob Covey and Adam Grano's designs alongside so many great art books:

WalkerBooks.jpg

Adam attended MCAD for a little less than two years and I'm guessing that young MCAD Adam would have been pretty thrilled to know that in a few short years he'd be able to find his work in the Walker. 

The highlight of the trip, however, came after MCAD, and after the Walker, and that was our tour of the grim and gritty La Mano offices, courtesy La Mano El Jefe, Zak Sally (after an absolute kick-ass lunch at Brasa, which singlehandedly made me consider moving to MN). Zak gave us the V.I.P. tour, showing us the La Mano printing press, as well as his art studio, where much of the forthcoming Sammy the Mouse #3 hangs on the wall. There are few things in life more enjoyable to me than seeing where an artist I admire does what he does, and La Mano was no disappointment. Here's a few pics:

LaManoPress.jpgRingerPlate.jpgSammyPages.jpg

And that's about all I got. Aside from the fact that Minneapolis was clearly settled centuries ago on a gorgeous spring or fall day with little regard for how the rest of the seasons might pan out, I could live there and look forward to returning. Oh, and to bring things full-circle, this was one of the last things we saw in Minneapolis before boarding our plane back to Seattle:

SnoopyMN.jpg

Thank you, MCAD!


Tardi Part IV: Meet Manchette
Written by Kim Thompson | Filed under Jacques Tardi 12 Mar 2009 7:28 AM

West Coast Blues by Jacques Tardi and Jean-Patrick Manchette

As you are surely aware by now if you've been following this blog, Fantagraphics will be releasing two graphic novels by the great French cartoonist Jacques Tardi this summer. Yesterday I discussed the first of the two, Ici même. Today I hit the other one: West Coast Blues, née Le petit bleu de la côte Ouest.

Tardi has always had a special affinity for detective-slash-crime fiction, so it was natural that he would pair up with Jean-Patrick Manchette. Aside from being the pre-eminent crime writer of his generation, with ten short, powerfully dark crime novels to his credit, Manchette happened to be an enthusiastic comics fan. (Those scenes in Tardi's adaptation of West Coast Blues in which one of the hitmen enjoys a French-language Spider-Man comic are not Tardi's comics-centric invention, in fact; they're in the original text.)

American Eurocomics fans with long memories may remember that back in the early 1990s, our own Pictopia magazine serialized Griffu, a hardboiled Tardi thriller from 1978 written by none other than Manchette. And hardboiled fiction fans may in fact already be aware of Three to Kill, released by City Lights in 2002, which in fact is the English translation of the original Petit Bleu novel. It's out of print (although you can find inexpensive copies at Amazon.com), but The Prone Gunman, which City Lights released the same year, isn't.

(New Manchette fans may be intrigued at the thought of the 1980 Alain Delon-starring film of Petit bleu, retitled 3 hommes à abattre, but as I understand it the film is neither particularly good nor particularly faithful to Manchette, nor were two subsequent Delon-starring Manchette adaptations, and they were a prime element in Manchette's ongoing disillusionment with the film industry.)

Anyway, Manchette passed away in 1995, leaving Griffu as his only graphic novel (although Manchette did place his imprint on French comics in one other important way, as the French translator of one of the seminal graphic novels of the 1980s: Watchmen). So for those of us who really liked Griffu, it came as great news when Tardi decided to give that book a new sibling, an adaptation of Le petit bleu de la côte Ouest, which was released in 2005.

Tomorrow: My concluding speech and exhortation, and a longish preview of You Are There.


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