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New Releases

Peanuts Every Sunday: 1956-1960 (Vol. 2)
Peanuts Every Sunday: 1956-1960 (Vol. 2)
$49.99
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The Complete Peanuts 1953-1954 (Vol. 2) [Softcover Ed.]
The Complete Peanuts 1953-1954 (Vol. 2) [Softcover Ed.]
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The Complete Peanuts 1950-1954 (Vols. 1 - 2) Gift Box Set Softcover Ed.]
The Complete Peanuts 1950-1954 (Vols. 1 - 2) Gift Box Set Softcover Ed.]
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Bumf Vol. 1: I Buggered the Kaiser
Bumf Vol. 1: I Buggered the Kaiser
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Walt Disney's Uncle Scrooge and Donald Duck: Return to Plain Awful (The Don Rosa Library Vol. 2) [U.S./CANADA ONLY - Pre-Order]
Walt Disney's Uncle Scrooge and Donald Duck: Return to Plain Awful (The Don Rosa Library Vol. 2) [U.S./CANADA ONLY - Pre-Order]
Price: $29.99

Aces High (The EC Comics Library) [Pre-Order]
Aces High (The EC Comics Library) [Pre-Order]
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Arsène Schrauwen [Pre-Order]
Arsène Schrauwen [Pre-Order]
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For One Day We Shall Rule the World
Written by Eric Reynolds | Filed under reviewsJules Feiffer 19 Oct 2008 1:34 PM

  

Today marks something of a milestone for Fantagraphics: our very first -- in 32 years of publishing -- cover of the venerable New York Times Book Review. Featured is Jules Feiffer's EXPLAINERS, in review by David Kamp titled "Cartoons for Grown-Ups" (who'da ever thunkit??). The online version even has the requisite NY Times slideshow. As my good pal Thom put it to me this morning via email, "What's next... a black president?" There is hope. 

But wait, that's not even all! The very same issue of the NYTBR features a full-page review of Jaime & Gilbert Hernandez's recent work, by the critic Douglas Wolk, appropriately titled "The Audacity of Hopey". The piece reviews The Education of Hopey GlassAmor Y Cohetes, and Love & Rockets: New Stories #1

  

Blogosphere roundup for 10/17/08
Written by Mike Baehr | Filed under reviews 17 Oct 2008 3:28 PM

Our weekly compilation of online reviews and such:

Madinkbeard (aka Derik Badman) examines Bottomless Belly Button by Dash Shaw

Jog examines Deitch's Pictorama

Comic Book Bin looks at Love and Rockets: New Stories #1 by the Hernandez Brothers; L.S.D. - Letras Sin Desperdicio also checks it out

Publishers Weekly looks at Rebel Visions: The Underground Comix Revolution 1963-1975 by Patrick Rosenkranz

Sequart gets in the first word on John Kerschbaum's Petey & Pussy, calling it "one of the best [books] of the year to date"

The Guardian reprints excerpts from Matt Groening and Jonathan Franzen's introductions to The Complete Peanuts 1955-1956 and 1957-1958 respectively as those volumes see UK release

Johnny Bacardi weighs in on Meat Cake #17 by Dame Darcy

Artvoice looks at Krazy and Ignatz 1943-1944: He Nods in Quiescent Siesta by George Herriman

Here's the "and such":

• For Legacy.com, Zak Sally memorializes E.C. Segar

On her website, Ellen Forney demonstrates some of her snazzy wedding invitation designs

Johnny Ryan: ready for Halloween

Here's a report from last Saturday's Cosmocopia event at our bookstore

Scene Magazine looks at the Los Angeles Farmer's Market through the eyes and pen of Mark Kalesniko

Print comments on the Vanity Fair interview with David Levine

Drinks with Tony has a 3-part audio interview with Daniel Clowes from 2006 (an old link which resurfaced on Lout Shelter)

Freezerbox profiles Bill Mauldin

Comic Book Resources talks to Robert Goodin

Drawn highlights John Cuneo's illustrations for the Society of Illustrators' call-for-entries poster for Illustration 51

• Conflict of Interest Dept. again: for comiXology, TCJ assistant editor Kristy Valenti interviews Tim Hensley about his soundtrack, as Victor Banana, for Like a Velvet Glove Cast in Iron by Daniel Clowes

• Snake Eating Its Own Tail Dept: Love and Rockets/Comics Journal advertiser popidiot gives a nice plug to those publications on their blog, so here's some free extra advertising for them

• Sharing the sketchbook love: here's Nightcrawler as drawn by Colleen Coover, Jordan Crane, Linda Medley, and many others (via Drawn)

Our Own Little Economic Stimulus
Written by Larry Reid | Filed under Steven WeissmanJim WoodringFantagraphics Bookstore 17 Oct 2008 2:57 PM

In these uncertain economic times, there's nothing to lift your spirits like FREE comics, eh? Fantagraphics Bookstore & Gallery came into possession of a stash of Steven Weissman's LE SKETCH #06 micro mini comic, free for the asking to all store visitors. This delightful 16-panel accordion fold cartoon sketchbook on sturdy cardstock provides a great introduction to this popular Fantagraphics star.

Steven Weissman - Le Sketch No. 06

While you're at the store, check out Weissman's "Affect Horror" print, published by our friends at Payseur & Schmidt and available exclusively at Fantagraphics Bookstore for only $20. This 18" x 24" silkscreen is printed on an ultra-bright white Finch 80lb. cover stock. Limited to 125 signed and numbered copies. Cheap art for the huddled masses!

Steven Weissman - Affect Horror print

"Cosmocopia" Jim Woodring & Paul DiFilippo exhibit & book launch, Fantagraphics Bookstore, 10/11/08

As a bonus, you'll see Jim Woodring's lovely new COSMOCOPIA exhibition, as well as all our amazing new books, including the topical AMERICAN PRESIDENTS by incomparable illustrator David Levine.

Fantagraphics Bookstore & Gallery is located at 1201 S. Vale Street in Seattle's colorful Georgetown arts community, only minutes south of downtown. Open daily 11:30 to 8:00 PM, Sundays until 5:00 PM. Phone 206.658.0110. See you all soon.

Webcomics update for 10/17/08
Written by Mike Baehr | Filed under webcomicsSteven WeissmanmetaMartin Kellerman 17 Oct 2008 11:16 AM

Chocolate Cheeks by Steven Weissman

Time for the lucky 13th installment of Steven Weissman's in-progress pages from "Blue Jay," an epic 32-page story from Chocolate Cheeks, the next collection of the Yikes! gang's adventures. In this week's episode: Try, try again.

Rocky by Martin Kellerman

We also have our first Monday-Friday chunk of Martin Kellerman's Rocky up now. We'll be keeping a rolling 5-strip archive going, but this is your last chance to catch the first strip before the next one goes up on Monday.

As a reminder, registration is no longer required to read our webcomics; they're free for all! (We did have a few technical glitches along the way, but they're all worked out now.)
Yoda-lodel-lay-hee-hoo
Written by Eric Reynolds | Filed under Untagged  17 Oct 2008 8:00 AM

Six words sure to give him a nerdgasm: Mike Baehr is interviewed by StarWars.com (about his Yoda sketchbook).

Maggie for Obama
Written by Eric Reynolds | Filed under Jaime Hernandez 16 Oct 2008 3:39 PM

Bid on this killer piece and more HERE

 

MaggieO.png

  

Beasts Print Show | Modern Printmaking Fulmination
Written by Jacob Covey | Filed under productionBeasts 16 Oct 2008 2:15 PM

Crane_Screenprint.jpg

I have quietly been organizing a BEASTS! print show for the Fantagraphics Bookstore and Gallery's Second Anniversary in December. Details will come in November but in short: The show will feature art from any of the 180 international artists who wish to make non-digital prints of their beast, whether it's the art that ran in the books or new variations. What follows here is simply a manifesto of sorts-- an explanation for why this print show is what it is. This came about because some people were confused why I don't want to sell digital prints, including our hard-working gallerist who was supportive but stressed the pragmatic fact that digital prints sell.

Admittedly, I'm making a soapbox stand with this show by insisting on prints that have had the human hand involved somehow and by denouncing digital prints which are exactly what they sound like: Prints done on an inkjet printer. These prints are also called "giclée" by those who are understandably embarrassed by all the coldness that is connoted by the term "digital print." Honestly, the only reason to call digital prints giclée is to distract from their origin and to imply repsectability. What is a screenprint? A print made through (traditionally silk) screens. What is a giclée? I have no idea. This great article on the etymology tells me it's a French term that could mean the following: "a spurt of blood, a burst of machine-gun fire, a splashing with mud." So the term is awesomely poetic but still only poetic propoganda.

In fairness, the argument for giclée prints are their high quality (born from the computer's exactitude) and if your only concern is one of precision replication of an other, original piece of art then giclee is the way to go. However, as an emotional investment in Art Making its print-on-demand nature makes it a cop-out on the part of artists or, more commonly, the merchandiser (or, uh, gallery) who offers to make the prints for artists. Furthermore, compared to the meticulous craft that goes into all traditional print-making forms a giclee print is truly nothing more than Product. Even if the original creation was unmistakeably Art, the shadow that is a giclée is but a soulless Product.

I think it's crucial that the buyer is aware that the print is a product that can be replicated at a moment's notice (just send it to print on the computer) and reproduced infinitely, without variation. And while these prints can be promised as limited editions this is still essentially meaningless inasmuch as a person could scan and print a virtually identical giclée. Frequently this limited edition is only printed as orders come in so a limited edition of 10 prints may never even get made past the one you order. I'm sure this rarely happens but it does happen and even as a theoretical practice I find it cheap and subversive to the model that artists rely upon in valuing reproduction editions.

Meanwhile there is a mind-boggling craft involved in all traditional print-making that makes any hand-crafted print far more valuable than any digital print. Perhaps it sounds snobbish to make these distinctions but the truth is that giving something a French name in order to sell it is far more snooty than my position which is as an advocate for the value of Art in this Age of Mechanical Reproduction. Aside from the fact that giclée prints are far more expensive per-unit than most any other process, I simply find it consumerist and soulless to actively convince people that a digital print has any value beyond decoration or as reference material. It is, as a kind of Platonic thing, not capable of being Art. For example, screenprinting is perhaps the most common and well-known non-printing-press, print-making technique [entertaining Aesthetic Apparatus instructional video here]. It's potentially cheap and easy if also messy. It can be as simple as one-color screened on paper or something complex and nuanced like this 24-layer Gary Baseman print from Decoder Ring. But it has SOUL that resonates back through generations of our ancestors who developed hands-on methods for spreading information and art. 

And you can FEEL the ink when you run your hand over the surface of a screenprint. You can see flaws, shifts in registration, places where the screen flow became dried up, etc. The ink has characteristics that interact from one color to the next. You can stare at the art as a built-up object and every print is crafted-- either with such imprecision that every print is distinctly unique or with such precision as to baffle the viewer who understands the process (like anyone who has ever picked up a pen can marvel at Charles Burns' machine-like lines). But the point is that every one of these prints becomes a new piece of art. The original art is its own entity and every single reproduction is another. 

Jordan Crane is a surprisingly perfect example of this. A man of absolute craft, he has decidedly flawed screenprints. His original art for the Lestrygonian of BEASTS! Book One is gorgeously executed with subtle pencil marks still showing under the seemingly-effortless inked art (with almost no correction fluid used on his lines). The black line art of the original is brought to life further through his coloring in the screenprinted version of this art but it also shows the inconsistency of watery inks that are laid down by the artist in his makeshift print studio. Every screenprint certainly has its own final appearance but more importantly it feels like an extension of the artist and if you know that he personally researched and built the studio and makes these prints himself and probably destroys half the run in a rage against the imperfections, well, it just imbues more life in the print when you look at it.

Some artists use this process as a means to essentially create the original art. For example, a few years ago I bought this print by Mat Daly. There is no original art as such-- this is all cut from rubylith. If you don't know what that means you probably can't appreciate every level of this complicated print but suffice it to say that there is no "original" art except in the form of many ruby-colored translucent sheets that have been cut into shapes and layered on top of one another. It requires someone with a keen ability to intuitively pre-visualize and it's jaw-dropping what he does-- beside the fact that the art itself is beautiful and smart. 

Jay Ryan might be a more traditional example of someone using print-making to create a new "original" work. His posters start out as original pencil drawings which are sometimes collaged together via xeroxing (creating a kind of third "original") and then colored by means of cutting film in the screenprinting process I believe. (He also uses a lot of "split fountains" to dynamic effect-- a coloring process that is intrinsically ever-shifting.) 

Jesse LeDoux represents a mostly-digital artist who makes printed work via screenprinting. His art becomes all about reducing the work to simplified shapes and colors that translate to the limitations and opportunities unique to screenprinting (for example, he uses a lot of overlaying of colors to extend his palette-- for people only familiar with Photoshop that's like using the Multiply feaure in your layers palette but you only get to see the result by burning film and printing the layers). 

Monoprints are the ultimate example of print-making as Art. Lizz Hickey is one of my favorite artists carrying that torch. Much of her work involves physically and chemically etching metal plates (sometimes shaping the plates into specific forms that leave a desired imprint in soft, cottony paper) and she frequently takes this print-making a step further by hand-coloring or drawing on the print, potentially ruining her efforts. The work is obsessive and if you don't feel life coarsing through the print when you hold it then none of this writing here probably matters to you. I sometimes (seriously) think that if I left the house for a week I could come home to her print having spawned Killoffer-like, taking over the walls of every room.

Meanwhile, readers of this diatribe might wonder about all the digital artists whose work seems too layered, too full of continuous tone to make affordable prints other than inkjet giclée. I felt badly excluding those artists from the print show but two brilliant artists put me at ease by endorsing this stand against giclée: One who will be part of the show and one who will not. Collagist/photographer Thomas Allen told me that he still shoots on film (because it matters) and maybe he doesn't make albumen prints but he does make prints on good old-fashioned light-sensitive paper.

Yuko Shimizu is a highly-regarded mostly-digital artist who I admire all the more for writing this to me: "As a digital artist I don’t believe in selling digital prints, so more power to you. I won’t be able to participate in the show, but that sounds great, congratulations. ...People constantly ask me why I don’t sell prints. I just don’t believe in them!!"

So that's my reason for the non-giclée BEASTS! print show. We, the 180 artists, hereby offer an anomaly befitting the subject of mythological beasts: Prints made by hand. I hope people will support these artists who are invested in giving traditional stories a form and allowing meaning and craft to hold primacy over technology.

Empathy for the whole universe
Written by Mike Baehr | Filed under videoIvan Brunetti 16 Oct 2008 1:12 PM


Ivan Brunetti on An Anthology of Graphic Fiction, Vol. 2 from Yale University Press on Vimeo.

Description for this video produced by Yale University Press (link if you don't see it embedded above):

"Ivan Brunetti on An Anthology of Graphic Fiction, Cartoons, & True Stories, Volume 2 from Yale University Press – Video director John Kuramoto brings together dozens of images from leading indie comics artists featured in the book, along with commentary by its editor, award-winning cartoonist Ivan Brunetti. For more info, visit yalepress.yale.edu/yupbooks/book.asp?isbn=9780300126716"

Technical difficulties - please stand by
Written by Mike Baehr | Filed under meta 16 Oct 2008 10:17 AM

Our technical crew is working on fixing the broken images and strange style issues on the site. We should hopefully be back to normal shortly.

UPDATE: We're back to normal. Whew!

Now in stock: American Presidents by David Levine
Written by Mike Baehr | Filed under new releasesDavid Levine 15 Oct 2008 3:06 PM

American Presidents by David Levine

American Presidents
By David Levine

For more than a half century, David Levine has taken on the most powerful men of the free world with only his pen and a bottle of India ink. That pen has proved to be mightier than the sword as Levine skewered, illuminated, satirized and condemned every president of the 20th century, as well as the most significant presidents from colonial times and the Civil War era. His drawing of Lyndon Johnson revealing a scar in the shape of Vietnam is considered one of the most recognized (and most copied) of the Vietnam era. His devastating wit and delicately cross-hatched drawing have exposed the venality of the Nixon administration, the phoniness of the Reagan years, the duplicity of the Clinton era, and the evil of the Bush cabal. Nine administrations have come and gone during Levine's tenure, and with a new one on the horizon, the artist remains, unbowed, unfazed, and unrelenting.

Now for the first time, the best of Levine's five decades of portraits of American Presidents and their administrations are gathered in a comprehensive and visually dynamic book. From John Adams to George Bush; from John Quincy Adams to George W. Bush; from the Great Emancipator to the Great Society, Levine has captured them all, including present day candidates John McCain and Barack Obama.

David Levine is internationally renowned for his incisive caricatures of world figures in literature, politics, and the arts. For 45 years his work appeared in every issue of the New York Review of Books, and his drawings have been reproduced in Time, Newsweek, Esquire, Playboy, The New Yorker, New York Magazine, The Nation, and many other publications. Levine is perhaps the most influential caricaturist of the late twentieth century.

128-page black & white 8.5" x 10" softcover • $19.99
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