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Daily links: 2/23/09
Written by Mike Baehr | Filed under SupermenreviewsPopeyePeter BaggePeanutsMort WalkerMomeMark KalesnikoLove and RocketsLos Bros HernandezJohnny RyanJerry DumasJaime HernandezHumbugHernán MigoyaFrank ThorneFantagraphics BookstoreDerek Van GiesonDash ShawDaniel ClowesBoody RogersBeasts 23 Feb 2009 2:38 PM

• Review: Comic Book Resources gives Sam's Strip 4 out of 5 stars and calls it "a must for any fans of comic strips"

• Review: Comics Worth Reading takes on Supermen!

• Review: Rob Clough examines Mome Vol. 13

• Review: Parka Blogs checks out Beasts! Book 2

• Profile: Paul Gravett examines (and recommends) the work of Mark Kalesniko in an article which also appears in Comics International

• Blurb: Jared Axelrod, applying his "10 Rules of Quality Superhero Fiction," declares Jaime Hernandez's story in Love and Rockets: New Stories #1 "one of the best superhero comics of the past year"

• Blurb: John Whitlock recommends our Popeye books

• Blurb: The Geek Curmudgeon (a.k.a. Rick Klaw) previews Humbug, Boody and Supermen!

• Blurb: Books Are People, Too (a.k.a. Russ Kick) also previews Humbug

• Blurb: Rod McKie describes how comics by Daniel Clowes, Peter Bagge and the Hernandez Brothers helped him get through a health crisis

• Video: Slick Rivera visits Larry Reid at the Fantagraphics Bookstore & Gallery and finds out where the good stuff is stashed (found via Frank magazine [not to be confused with our Frank])

• Interview: Vice talks to Johnny Ryan and a couple of the other funny cartoonists who are in Kramer's Ergot #7

• Interview: If you're curious about new Mome contributor Hernán Migoya, and speak Spanish, LaNuez has a couple of video interview clips for you (via Entrecomics)

• Things to see: On his blog, Derek Van Gieson previews his work in the just-released Mome Vol. 14 (and keep exploring for a teaser of Mome Vol. 15)

• Things to see: On his blog, Dash Shaw presents a Bottomless Belly Button ex libris plate he created for French comics shop Super Heros (you may also have seen Jason Miles's photo of Dash at Super Heros here on Flog recently)

• Things to see: Boing Boing Gadgets presents a blast from future past, Frank Thorne style

• Things to see: Is an excuse needed to scan and share Seth's cover designs for The Complete Peanuts? The Comics Reporter thinks not

Now in stock: The Wolverton Bible by Basil Wolverton
Written by Mike Baehr | Filed under new releasesBasil Wolverton 20 Feb 2009 1:46 PM

The Wolverton Bible by Basil Wolverton

The Wolverton Bible
By Basil Wolverton

Cartoonist Basil Wolverton was known for his grotesque drawings, fantastically odd creatures, spaghetti-like hair, smoothly sculpted caricatures and insanely detailed crosshatching. His career in the golden age of comic books lasted from 1938 until 1952, after which his illustrations and caricatures extended into such publications as Life, Pageant and MAD magazines. Stylistically, he has been regarded as one of the spiritual grandfathers of underground and alternative comix.

Less well known and understood is his work for the Worldwide Church of God, headed until 1986 by radio evangelist Herbert Armstrong. From 1953 through 1974, Wolverton, a deeply religious man, was commissioned and later employed by the church to write and illustrate a narrative of the Old Testament (including over 550 illustrations), some 20 apocalyptic illustrations inspired by the Book of Revelations, and dozens of cartoons and humorous illustrations for various Worldwide Church publications.

Compiled and edited by Wolverton’s son, Monte, the 304-page Wolverton Bible includes all of Wolverton’s artwork for the Worldwide Church of God corporation. Recording artist and noted EC authority Grant Geissman (Tales of Terror: The E.C. Companion and Foul Play!: The Art and Artists of the Notorious 1950s E.C. Comics!) provides an insightful foreword, while Monte Wolverton delivers commentary and background in the introduction and in each section. This volume is authorized and commissioned by the Worldwide Church of God and endorsed by the Wolverton family.

Many of the illustrations in this book are regarded as Basil Wolverton’s finest work. Still others have never been published, and some of the humorous drawings printed here rival Wolverton’s work in MAD magazine.

(While supplies last, all orders for The Wolverton Bible will also receive, FREE, a set of 10 Wolvertoons Postcards!)

320-page black & white 8” x 10” hardcover • $24.99
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Now in stock: Sam's Strip by Mort Walker & Jerry Dumas
Written by Mike Baehr | Filed under new releasesMort WalkerJerry Dumas 20 Feb 2009 1:45 PM

Sam's Strip: The Comic About Comics by Mort Walker & Jerry Dumas

Sam's Strip: The Comic About Comics
By Mort Walker & Jerry Dumas

Sam’s Strip was ahead of its time when it debuted in 1961. Mort Walker and Jerry Dumas’ offbeat creation took the inside joke of breaking the “fourth wall” to a new level, playing with the basic elements of the cartoon form, experimenting with different art styles and featuring famous characters from other strips. Sam and his cartoonist assistant owned and operated the comic strip they inhabited. The Yellow Kid, Jiggs, Krazy Kat, Dagwood, and Charlie Brown were among the many familiar faces who made walk-on appearances. Sam and his assistant discussed the inner workings and hidden secrets of life within the panel borders. This type of self-referential humor, called “metacomics” by scholar Thomas Inge, had been explored previously by Al Capp, Ernie Bushmiller, and Walt Kelly and has been used on a more regular basis by such contemporary cartoonists as Garry Trudeau, Berke Breathed, and Bill Griffith. Sam’s Strip, which never appeared in more than 60 newpapers, was too esoteric for most readers, and was terminated by its creators in 1963. It is considered a cult classic among comic-strip aficionados today.

This collection features the complete 20-month run, almost 510 daily strips, of Sam’s Strip. Mort Walker and Jerry Dumas provide first-hand accounts of the creation of the strip and other rare, behind-the-scenes material, including unpublished sketches, original artwork, photographs and sales brochures. Take a trip beyond the fourth wall and rediscover this unique behind-the-scenes look at the world of comic strip humor.

208-page black & white (with some color) 10” x 8” softcover • $22.99
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Now in stock: Mome Vol. 14 - Spring 2009
Written by Mike Baehr | Filed under new releasesMome 20 Feb 2009 1:45 PM

Mome Vol. 14 - Spring 2009

Mome Vol. 14 - Spring 2009
By various artists; edited by Gary Groth & Eric Reynolds

The Spring 2009 edition of MOME is anchored with Lilli Carré's (The Lagoon) new, 32-page graphic novella, "The Carnival." Gilbert Shelton is back with the second part (of three) of his new graphic novel, "The Last Gig in Shnagrlig," and both Olivier Schrauwen and Laura Park are back with their sophomore Mome efforts. 2008 comics darling Dash Shaw delivers "Scenes from the Abyss," while Mome regulars Derek Van Gieson, Ray Fenwick, Jon Vermilyea, Sara Edward-Corbett, Conor O'Keefe, Émile Bravo, and Josh Simmons all return. To wrap it up, Ben Jones, Frank Santoro, Hernán Migoya and Juaco Vizuete all pop their Mome cherries this issue as well (the former two with a Cold Heat-related story).

120-page color/b&w 7” x 9” softcover • $14.99
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Daily links: 2/19-20/09
Written by Mike Baehr | Filed under Tony MillionairereviewsJohn Hankiewiczjeffrey brownEllen ForneyDash Shawart showsAnders Nilsen 20 Feb 2009 12:32 PM

Oops, I put yesterday's update together but forgot to click "publish." Here's a two-fer, then:

• Review: Rain Taxi says Bottomless Belly Button by Dash Shaw is one of the best graphic novels of 2008

• Event: Chapman University in Orange, CA has an exhibit of original comic art by Tony Millionaire, Jeffrey Brown and Adrian Tomine currently showing through March 13

• News: On her blog, Ellen Forney celebrates the news that I Love Led Zeppelin is to be published in a Czech edition

• Things to see: New sketchbook drawings and comics by Anders Nilsen

• Things to see (and buy): Prints by John Hankiewicz

Webcomics update for 2/20/09
Written by Mike Baehr | Filed under webcomicsSteven WeissmanmetaMartin KellermanJohnny Ryan 20 Feb 2009 10:57 AM

Blecky Yuckerella by Johnny Ryan

Friday is new webcomics day! First up, Johnny Ryan's Blecky Yuckerella to the rescue, sort of, in this week's strip.

Chocolate Cheeks by Steven Weissman

And in this week's installment of Steven Weissman's in-progress pages from "Blue Jay," an epic 32-page story from Chocolate Cheeks, the next collection of the Yikes! gang's adventures: the best laid plans...

Rocky by Martin Kellerman

And don't forget to catch up on our current 5-day chunk of Martin Kellerman's hilarious Swedish smash-hit Rocky, updated Monday-Friday! This week: celebrating New Year's, Rocky-style.

Welcome home, Junior.
Written by Eric Reynolds | Filed under misc 19 Feb 2009 8:44 AM

Sam's Strip: Read the Authors' Introductions
Written by Mike Baehr | Filed under new releasesMort WalkermetaJerry Dumas 18 Feb 2009 4:27 PM

Sam's Strip press release illustration

Our collection of Sam's Strip contains two introductory essays by the strip's creators, which we've placed online for you to read and enjoy while you're waiting for the book to be released (any day now): "How Sam's Strip Began" by Jerry Dumas and "My Time with Sam's Strip" by Mort Walker. Together they comprise a Rashomon-like tale of the strip's run.

Humbug signature plate - first look
Written by Mike Baehr | Filed under previewsnew releasesHumbug 18 Feb 2009 3:00 PM

Humbug: Limited Signed Edition signature plate

Humbug: Limited Signed Edition signature plate

The tri-fold signature plate shown above (front and back -- click here and here for better views) that comes with Humbug: Limited Signed Edition is currently winging its way between Jack Davis, Al Jaffee and Arnold Roth as they apply their signatures to it. (While they're hard at work, you can reserve your copy today.)

SLIDE SHOW part three
Written by Jason Miles | Filed under Untagged  18 Feb 2009 1:47 PM

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 An American in Paris! Can I buy you a fancy lunch? Snails? How do you work this thing!?! Oh boy... that's right! Even though I was upright my fingers were fast asleep. Wish I could tell you these were the only misfires on my camera...

These photos are from my second day in Paris. I woke up at 7am (10pm Seattle time) and enjoyed the complimentary breakfast of a large roll, croissant, cereal and... another croissant. For the record, every morning I consumed AT LEAST 3 to 4 members of the bread family. My plan for the day was to find a LARGE CUP OF COFFEE*, hopefully several and to walk ALL OVER Paris (by days end I'd walked close to 15 miles by my dirty American reckonin').

 *Most French coffee is small... espresso and the like... I hail from the Northwest; our coffee comes in buckets.

I took MANY photos during my hike around Paris, none of which I'm going to share (bore you with). If you've never been to Paris click here .

By early evening I made my way to the 4th arrondissement where Dash Shaw was signing the French edition of Bottomless Belly Button at the fantastic comic book shop Super Heros.

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As you approach Super Heros you see this giant Jacques Tardi billboard... honestly, it's things like this that make Paris great. Why would there be a comic book shop in Paris called Super Heros with Tardi imagery for signage?

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Yes, in France there is Tintin type everywhere and it's awesome.

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Super Heros' storefront.

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Inside we find Dash Shaw and Editions çà et là éditeur Serge Ewenczyk. It was a surprising relief to speak some American (not English, American). When I first saw Dash I had trouble navigating the word "Hey." Serge was a godsend and took us to a nice little place where we had crêpes (mine was called the "Toronto" and came with a sausage patty and fried egg). 

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At Super Heros they had a limited edition Charles Burns / Killoffer print!

Okey, hold on tight, we're going to do some time traveling.

The following photos were taken the day after Festival International de la Bande Dessinée d'Angoulême ended and I was back in Paris, where it had snowed.

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The only reason I took this photo was to prove to my Grandpa that it snowed in Paris. 9.Obama.jpg

Lets get one thing straight. Paris was lousy with Obama propaganda . Everwhere I looked I saw t-shirts proclaiming "My President is Black." I couldn't help but wonder if tacit French rasicsm extends to Obama or not. I asked a few expats and they all responded with fishy shrugs.

Moving right along... Since I was in Paris I decided I should go visit Centre Georges Pompidou... 10.SurrealistComix.jpg

... to read some comix! Courtesy André Breton and co. 11.SurrealistComix.jpg

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 Just as I was about to leave Centre Georges Pompidou I spotted a flyer for a talk to be given by Joe Dog aka Anton Kannemayer, Konradski aka Conrad Botes and Joe Daly. The talk was centered around the amazing Bitterkomix and it was fantastic. I highly recommend all of their work.

On my way home I spied this...

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 ... some French smart alec demanding Jordan Crane's NON #6.

More to come.