Search / Login

Quick Links:
Latest Releases
Browse by Artist
Love and Rockets Guide
Peanuts books
Disney books
More browsing options under "Browse Shop" above


Search: All Titles

Advanced Search
Login / Free Registration
Detail Search
Download Area
Show Cart
Your Cart is currently empty.

Subscribe

Sign up for our email newsletters for updates on new releases, events, special deals and more.



New site poll
Written by Mike Baehr | Filed under meta 10 Apr 2008 1:43 PM

We ended voting on our poll question "Which part of our product listings do you find most useful or persuasive?" and more than half of you who responded said "Preview images & downloads." We're already stepping up our efforts to give you more of what you want (and now that Flickr is hosting videos, watch for video previews in the near future), so thanks for your feedback! See the final poll results here. If you have any other comments, please drop us a line.

For our new poll, we're asking what your primary consideration is when making a purchase from our website. The poll can be found on the right column of FLOG and on our front page (and elsewhere on our site). We promise that we'll take a break from picking your brains for marketing info and put up a fun poll in the near future!

Sneak peek photos: Amor Y Cohetes
Written by Mike Baehr | Filed under previewsnew releasesLove and RocketsLos Bros Hernandez 10 Apr 2008 12:42 PM

Amor Y Cohetes - A Love and Rockets Book by Los Bros Hernandez

Time for another daily photographic sneak peek at an upcoming book that we recently received "in the flesh" at the office. Today it's the latest and final (for now) volume in our Love and Rockets Library reprint series, Amor Y Cohetes, collecting all the stand-alone non-continuity stuff from L&R Vol. 1. For a Flickr slideshow, click here, or to browse manually, click here.

Meg Hunt
Written by Jacob Covey | Filed under Meg HuntKovey Korner 10 Apr 2008 11:01 AM

There are a few artists who I've been wanting to post about before I get swamped with fatherly duties. I'll be trying to do that over the next week or so. Up first...

megpreg.jpg

Meg Hunt is still a young illustrator but one whose details you can look at and see that she works hard to flesh out her images for her own development as an artist-- her clients probably wouldn't notice if she spent half the time she does on her work. Which is exactly why I enjoy watching her evolve and why she's someone who will be working for more of the clients who DO notice the details.

She's also one of the few design-conscious illustrators that I enjoy. I can't really define what I mean by that (and there's probably an actual term for this), but all of her illustrations are very designed, have a smart color palette and textures, and emphasize shapes more than, say, a fully-formed setting. Most illustrators who do this do so at the expense of a soul to the work but Meg maintains life and a personal vision in what she does-- the backgrounds still matter and evoke relevant setting.

MegPrint.jpg

megruby.jpg

 

Check out her Flickr page to see more process, including details on the handcut rubyliths that make up that screenprint above. I was happy to learn that she never composes her images in the computer, still preferring to plan it all out by hand, including her sophisticated, overlapping coloring.

Meg would be great for the children's book market. Are you reading this, children's book market? Call her.

MEANWHILE, that print will be in an art show here in Seattle that opens Friday at the Suite 100 Gallery.

Get her Tinymeat wallet here.

MegWallet.jpg

Ray Fenwick's Kalligraphy Klass
Written by Mike Baehr | Filed under videoRay Fenwick 10 Apr 2008 10:07 AM

Fun with the new Flickr video feature from Ray Fenwick:

(By the way, now that there's video on Flickr, we've added a few clips to our own stream.)

Whoa.
Written by Eric Reynolds | Filed under Daniel Clowes 10 Apr 2008 8:05 AM

Coming soon from Presspop of Japan: The "I Will Eat Tokyo" Enid doll!

Quote of the day.
Written by Eric Reynolds | Filed under Untagged  10 Apr 2008 7:40 AM

"[The Clouds Above is] dedicated to Andalucia and Skeezix - if those are Jordan Crane's kids then I married the wrong person."

Pink Me, I got news for you: you blew it.  

 

Sketchbook #12
Written by Eric Reynolds | Filed under marc bellart 10 Apr 2008 7:03 AM

Courtesy Marc Bell. Marc, we want a Worn Tuff Elbow #2! #1 is apparently so rare I couldn't find even any existence of it on our website.

NY Mag excerpts Jessica Farm
Written by Eric Reynolds | Filed under Josh Simmons 10 Apr 2008 6:57 AM
 Read a nice meaty chunk of Josh Simmons' goosebump-inducing new book right here!
On Comics and Design.
Written by Jacob Covey | Filed under Design 9 Apr 2008 7:15 PM

spiritoutdoorartsmall.jpg


Above is the poster triptych for the upcoming film for Will Eisner's Spirit, as done by Frank Miller-- a poster set that I feel deserves some scrutiny in this age of design consciousness.

Basically there are two mediums coalescing here: Comic Books, a medium defined by multi-panel narrative, and The Poster, a medium that relies upon bold, single-image impact to resonate at a glance. Granted, the poster can have multiple levels-- allowing for a more involved, secondary narrative within the primary image-- but at the most basic level it must compel people with the initial impact of a single, overall form.

In many ways it seems a dream opportunity in teaser marketing to use the staggered movie poster concept with a comics film. Afterall, the staggered delivery of poster teasers essentially requires a kind of multi-panel narrative. (The first poster goes up in Week One, the second poster goes up in Week Two, and finally the piqued audience is rewarded with the payoff with the final poster in Week Three.) Throw in a master of dramatic, 2-color imagery (Frank Miller) and you should have it sewn up.

posterwall.jpg

Yet whoever is behind this design has managed the least compelling image possible as a 'teaser' for the new Spirit movie. To make my point, I've Photoshopped the second teaser poster onto a wall of posters you might see around town. Can you even find it on there? It's a bad sign when you can't stand apart from the chaos of community posters (and I didn't even bother with the first poster which has zero visual interest). The only saving grace is that the image has a lot of "white" space. Perhaps the folks behind this just figure they'll put up all three posters together all the time, which goes against all of the realities of postering. Competition for wall space is fierce and there are limited venues for blanketing a wall with the posters. More likely, they just lost sight of the fact that comics can do so much more than this one static, hacked up image does. And, on the other hand, if they do intend to only do these as a set I'm offended if only because of the oppulence of it. That's not guerrilla marketing, that's a lot of money thrown at a half-considered solution.

In any case, the point of a teaser poster is to post a single compelling image that leaves the viewer wondering what's next. But here you get one part great primary poster image and two parts lazy extension of the main image. You get a vague red tie. Comics fans can love this trio of images but the fact is a lazy red tie isn't going to hook anybody not already interested in this film. A lazy red tie isn't even going to get people to waste their time wondering what the formless red mass on black might be. It's not even interesting enough to be used in a Rorschach test.

Maybe it works with all three posters placed together (I still find it lazy and even cheesy... especially as they have it animated on their official website). I realize this is Miller's style and that Miller is Hollywood Gold but that doesn't excuse this weak campaign. There's just no reason whatsoever that the Spirit's multi-panel comic book storytelling couldn't have translated brilliantly onto the individual posters that compose the final triptych.

You may wonder why I care. Basically I care because graphic design is a field that is currently in a position of finally being understood and valued by the mainstream culture while becoming overrun with unconsidered value for novelty and the idea that anyone with a computer is a designer-- resulting in a pervasive mentality that "if it looks cool, it's good." This phenomena also happens to parallel the position of comics as the field breaks into mainstream acceptance as valid Art and grown-up Entertainment while also being overwhelmed with Johnny-Come-Latelys who think there are any number of ways they're going to get rich quick. Both of these fields are weakened by work that is created with only a surface understanding of "the rules" but has no follow-through. In the case of the Spirit poster series the look of the final tryiptych is a superficial accomplishment, completely lacking in real-world follow-through.

I'm particularly critical of this campaign because the film has such high visibility (and huge budgets) that this type of work is dragging down the potential and perceived significance of both comics and design. And this isn't a philisophical issue-- it even makes economic sense. In fact, I originally thought this film was produced by Marvel or DC (I guess DC owns the publishing rights) but it's telling that this appears to be independent of any comics publisher and that, in spite of Frank Miller's connection to it, the marketing is so insensitive to the source material and the comics medium. This kind of marketing will only serve to perpetuate the popular opinion of comics as gimmicky and lacking in thoughtful and savvy substance. Ultimately I guess it's fitting that even without Marvel or DC involved the marketing for Spirit continues popular comics' own established track record for undervaluing the power of the work and misunderstanding even the basic strategies of marketing that every other industry seems to grasp.

'Nuff said.

Sneak peek photos: The Number 73304-23-4153-6-96-8
Written by Mike Baehr | Filed under Thomas Ottpreviewsnew releases 9 Apr 2008 3:14 PM

The Number 73304-23-4153-6-96-8 by Thomas Ott

Each day this week (except yesterday, when we didn't have time) we're bringing you a photographic sneak peek of a different upcoming book that we recently received "in the flesh" at the office. Today we've got Thomas Ott's new one The Number 73304-23-4153-6-96-8: for a Flickr slideshow, click here, or to browse manually, click here.