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1,000 newspapers want you to know that Jeff Parker is a dick. Daily.
Written by Jacob Covey | Filed under Kovey Kornercomic strips 15 Feb 2008 9:55 AM

wizardofid2008026112002.jpg

We publish some shocking comics but I had no idea that the most offensive strip was nationally syndicated "family fare." People are okay with this being what their kids grow up reading on the comics page, meanwhile they raise hell over a kid reading an issue of Dan Clowes' Eightball. Go figure.

 (*Note: Yes, I know I originally mistyped "Brant Parker" in the headline to this post even though his son, Jeff, took over being the Id's dick cartoonist in 1997. Apologies.)

Kikuo Johnson does Stallings
Written by Eric Reynolds | Filed under R Kikuo Johnson 15 Feb 2008 8:15 AM

On the Poetry Foundation website, R. Kikuo Johnson (Night Fisher) illustrates A. E. Stallings' poem "Recitative" as a comic strip.    
Theroux reads from Laura Warholic
Written by Eric Reynolds | Filed under Alexander Theroux 15 Feb 2008 8:14 AM

Alexander Theroux reads from his novel for Radio Boston, including a savaging of Boston Red Sox culture. Theroux's prose sounds especially great through his thick Medford accent.
New feature: Dan Clowes's "Modern Cartoonist"
Written by Mike Baehr | Filed under metaDaniel Clowes 14 Feb 2008 3:14 PM

Daniel Clowes's "Modern Cartoonist" essay caused quite a stir when it originally appeared as a bound-in booklet accompanying Eightball #18 in 1997; now we have archived it for your reading pleasure here on the Fantagraphics.com website.

Scavenger hunt: last chance!
Written by Mike Baehr | Filed under metacontests 14 Feb 2008 1:58 PM
Reminder: tomorrow is the last day for entries in our Scavenger Hunt contest! Everyone who's registered on Fantagraphics.com (sign in/sign up) has a chance to earn a 20%-off coupon good toward any online order by correctly answering ten trivia questions, and one randomly-chosen winner will receive a coupon for a whopping 50% off. All of the answers can be found on the new Fantagraphics.com. We'll contact the winners, and post the questions and answers here on Flog, on Monday.
The Learners
Written by Eric Reynolds | Filed under Chris WareChip KiddCharles Burns 14 Feb 2008 1:51 PM

Congrats to our pal Chip Kidd on the release of his second novel, The Learners. And how many people could get Charles Burns and Chris Ware to work on their cover? 
Woof
Written by Eric Reynolds | Filed under Charles M Schulz 14 Feb 2008 12:39 PM

Did we help Uno the Beagle win the Westminster dog showBook Hound doesn't rule it out

Steven Weissman loves you
Written by Mike Baehr | Filed under Steven Weissman 14 Feb 2008 11:22 AM

Steven Weissman Valentine

Forget to get your sweetie a Valentine? Head on over to Steven Weissman's blog for a printable card. Problem solved! 

Nicoriffic
Written by Eric Reynolds | Filed under staffevents 14 Feb 2008 10:54 AM

Our very own Nico Vassilakis (warehouse manager extraordinaire) has written a book, and he's having a party to prove it! Won't you join us?

WHEN: Feb. 23rd, 7:30pm

WHERE: McLeod Residence
2209 2nd Avenue
Seattle, Washington 98121

WHAT: TEXT LOSES TIME
By Nico Vassilakis
Published by ManyPenny Press

John Olson on TEXT LOSES TIME:

Implicit in the title of this collection is a ceremony of disintegration: shattering, fragmentation. A shedding of time. A shaking loose of the bonds of linearity and sequence. An immediacy of contact with the tools of construction so lucid and unsullied by the seductions of the future and the burdens of the past that the writing becomes a continuous doing and undoing, a joyful participation in the creation of a strange new alphabet of illimitable occurrence, a fetus of meaning in a placenta of ink.

The presentation is twofold: writing as writing (sentences, laminations, thought, “an undulant mind on soft display“), and concrete poetry -- letters arranged in eccentric patterns of visual energy. The writing is playful, probing, and provocative; sentences in paratactic leapfrog with their teasing proposals: “what restrains a superpower after guilt has lost its charm”; “as a windowsill is a place for elbows, so should a beach be a horizontal wonderment with the diesel fumes of military aggression”; “an unplugged brain is more dangerous than any taxpayer.” The emphasis with both strategies -- abstract and concrete, linguistic and visual -- is to advance an experience with language that becomes an ongoing textual genesis, Stein’s “continuous present.” It is also highly entertaining. Vassilakis is a funny guy, a postmodern Socrates with a quizzical cue stick.

This tendency toward showcasing the implements and machinery of language -- what Charles Bernstein calls “the desire for writing to be the end of its own activity, its very thatness” -- is most abundantly available in Vassilakis’s sections of concrete poetry. For instance, the configurations of letters displayed in the section titled “Rubber,” such as the entity on page 136 consisting of Os and Hs and Gs and Ss and Ts (which could spell the word ‘ghosts’ any number of times) (the letters are, in fact, rather pale) resembles some sort of wiggly-wobbly creature from the alphabet lagoon; Jean Tinguely’s Cyclops comes to mind, as do the Martians from War of the Worlds.

Wittgenstein wrote that “philosophical problems arise when language goes on holiday.” In Text Loses Time, language is on a holiday from time: sequence, servility, routine. We enter a hall of mirrors where words refer to one another. Where words bump one another like bumper cars, lean into the dark, return us to trance, the means by which we meander. Most importantly, it provides (I am drawing this quote from the Afterword by Nick Piombino)”, “an exit from the current pervasive cultural tendency to employ meaning and visual space according to needs and desire for personal advantage, corporate profit and social control… refuge in the microscopic details of immediate, unfiltered visual and internal perception…”

Buy TEXT LOSES TIME here.  



Gllgglbbbllggg...
Written by Eric Reynolds | Filed under Gary Panterevents 14 Feb 2008 9:59 AM

The headline is the sound of me drooling...