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Archive >> September 2011

Peter Bagge talks to Reason TV
Written by Mike Baehr | Filed under videoPeter Baggeinterviews 30 Sep 2011 4:44 PM

Interviewer Nick Gillespie talks to Peter Bagge for Reason TV (YouTube link):

"Bagge discusses how he came to define his libertarian political worldview at a young age, and laments his frustration at being an artist who's political views are frequently mischaracterized as 'right wing' by other artists, simply for failing to be in lock-step with the rest of the predominantly progressive-left art world. He also discusses a recent Reason assignment which took him within the walls of a women's prison, and how the experience led him to question his own preconceived notions about the drug war and involuntary incarceration for drug users. His funny, outrageous and often introspective anthology of Reason cartoon journalism, Everybody is Stupid Except Me (And Other Astute Observations) is available from Fantagraphics."

Yes it is!

Paul Hornschemeier's The Daily Forlorn, the book
Written by Mike Baehr | Filed under Paul Hornschemeier 30 Sep 2011 4:05 PM

The Daily Forlorn - Paul Hornschemeier

As if you need another reason to go to the Alternative Press Expo in San Francisco this weekend, publisher Chance Press will be offering The Daily Forlorn, a collection of artwork from Paul Hornschemeier's sketch blog of the same name in a limited-edition and fancy-sounding package. Deets chez Paul.

Celebrating Clemente's 3000th
Written by Mike Baehr | Filed under Wilfred Santiago21 30 Sep 2011 3:39 PM

21: The Story of Roberto Clemente by Wilfred Santiago

Above, the triumphant moment of Roberto Clemente's 3000th career base hit, which took place 39 years ago today, as depicted in 21: The Story of Roberto Clemente by Wilfred Santiago. Celebrate the milestone anniversary by curling up with a copy of the book! (Thanks to the ever-vigilant Janice for catching the anniversary!)

Tim Lane & John Porcellino at Subterranean Books
Written by janice headley | Filed under Tim Laneevents 30 Sep 2011 3:11 PM

John Porcellino & Tim Lane at Subterranean Books

We're thrilled to announce that our very own Tim Lane will be joining the great John Porcellino at Subterranean Books this coming Monday, October 3rd!

Together, they will give a slideshow presentation, followed by a Q&A and book signing, so if you haven't picked up Abandoned Cars yet, this is your not-to-be-missed chance!

The fun starts at 7:00 PM! Subterranean Books is located at 6275 Delmar In the Loop in lovely St. Louis.

Seattle Gets Drawn to Drawing Power!
Written by janice headley | Filed under Warren BernardFantagraphics BookstoreeventsDrawing Power 30 Sep 2011 2:47 PM

Tom Neely and Ajax Wood say hello

Thank you so much to everyone who made it out to the Fantagraphics Bookstore & Gallery last weekend for our signings with Warren Bernard, editor of Drawing Power: A Compendium of Cartoon Advertising, and Tom Neely, artist behind The Wolf!

Here's artist Tom Neely and warehouse champ Ajax Wood saying hello!

Larry Reid introduces Warren Bernard

We were thrilled to have editor Warren Bernard in attendance, barely recovered from the most successful SPX: Small Press Expo yet! Here, store curator Larry Reid introduces him to the crowd...

Warren Bernard presents Drawing Power

Warren's slideshow presentation had the audience riveted and clambering for copies of Drawing Power: A Compendium of Cartoon Advertising once it was over! You can check out more photos of the presentation at the Fantagraphics Flickr page, and you can listen to audio from his D.C. presentation here on the FLOG!

Gary Groth demonstrates his powerful swivel-arm action to Jim Woodring and Tom NeelyJason T. Miles and Warren Bernard stay safely in the background.

Wolftrap Wine at the Fantagraphics Bookstore & Gallery

Wolftrap wine was served for the occasion!

Tom Neely

What goes good with red wine? Ah, yes... (Just kidding... white wine's better for chihuahuas...)

You can check out more photos of this fun event at the Fantagraphics Flickr page! It was a wonderful time! Thanks to all attendees, and thanks especially to Warren & Tom!

And we hope everyone will return to the Fantagraphics Bookstore & Gallery this Saturday, October 1st as we present Oil and Water, with journalist Steve Duin and editor Michael Rosen in attendance!  See you there!

Diaflogue: Michael Kupperman Exclusive Q&A
Written by janice headley | Filed under Michael KuppermaninterviewsDiaflogue 30 Sep 2011 2:15 PM

Mark Twain's Autobiography 1910-2010 by Michael Kupperman

This interview with Michael Kupperman about his new book Mark Twain's Autobiography 1910-2010 was conducted by Fantagraphics intern Steven Davis. Thanks to Steven and Michael!

STEVEN DAVIS: You’ve been talking about doing a longer-form narrative for a while. What made you decide on the autobiographical format?

MICHAEL KUPPERMAN: It’s just what I fell into doing. I find the reasons for doing things, the “why,” is very important, and if you’re doing what you’re doing because it genuinely amuses, you’re in the strongest position possible. I just started writing a couple of chapters and I was enjoying it, and it felt like the right thing to do to go for a book.

DAVIS: How do you feel about your results?

KUPPERMAN: Well, I’m always self-critical to a painful degree, but I do find myself laughing when I look at it. I feel pretty good, I guess; the reader’s reaction is all up to whether they find me funny or not.

DAVIS: Was it refreshing to work with a different format?

KUPPERMAN: It’s interesting to notice the difference. Both are wonderful escapes — and with writing I’m able to execute some rapid changes of idiom — but one notable thing is that writing has more of a time limit. You can only write for two or three hours at a stretch before you start to lose focus, I find. Whereas drawing is an activity you can really lose yourself in for as long as you can stay awake — I’ve drawn for as long as 20 hours at a stretch.

DAVIS: Why is Mark Twain a better target for parody than his partner Albert Einstein?

KUPPERMAN: Well, there was the occasion of the anniversary of his death: That really tipped the scales. But Einstein only really works for me as a character in relation to Twain: the same way Harpo only worked in relation to Chico or Groucho. Not alone. I’d love to do more with the two of them, though.

DAVIS: There’s a full chapter in the book that is cartooned, in which Mark Twain finds himself an accidental member of the Apollo 11 mission. Why did you decide to cartoon this section?

KUPPERMAN: I just wanted to break up the text a bit, and the Moon mission seemed like a good excuse to do some cartooning. That’s one in which many of the jokes are more visual.

DAVIS: Did any ideas that you’d originally intended to be comics get transformed into prose?

KUPPERMAN: No. That’s not so easy to do… A lot of ideas only work for the medium you invented them for. I have a bunch of material from my various aborted TV pilot deals that I can’t find a way to re-use, unfortunately.

DAVIS: What is the appeal of autobiographies? How does that translate into satire?

KUPPERMAN: Autobiographies have an automatically funny component in the self-deception that we all practice, which can be inadvertently revealing. The self-justifying and obfuscation that most autobiographies contain are comedy gold. The last two I read were the autobiographies of Jerry Weintraub and Esther Williams. Both contained comedic elements, although Esther was by far the better swimmer.

DAVIS: What specific autobiographical tropes did you most focus on subverting?

KUPPERMAN: False modesty is a big one, also unwittingly revelatory anecdotes, such as when the aliens try to get Twain to have sex with Sophia Loren; and the shaping of one’s life into a narrative, and how unreliable that can be.

DAVIS: You’ve talked about simplifying the cartooning in order to better focus on the humor. How is this reflected in Twain as compared to your past works?

KUPPERMAN: I think the Twain book is a big step forward in that direction. The art is much more streamlined, and less influenced by art from the past. I concentrated on just carrying the jokes through the art.

DAVIS: There’s a momentum in Tales Designed to Thrizzle that moves the reader through the book, even though it lacks a continuous narrative. In what ways did you approach flow and progression for Twain?

KUPPERMAN: I tried to vary the tone of the chapters enough so that the reader would be carried through what is basically a series of routines… I’ve never sustained one scenario for so long, but I’m eager to move on to longer projects still.

DAVIS: How did Snake ‘N’ Bacon become your flagship strip?

KUPPERMAN: People kept asking for it. And when Avon (subsequently bought by HarperCollins) asked me to do a book, they insisted Snake ‘N’ Bacon be in the title. Then later on Scott Jacobson and Rich Blomquist from The Daily Show spearheaded the Snake ’N’ Bacon pilot for Adult Swim, same thing. They’re anti-characters, basically: extremely limited in almost every way.

Some people do really seem to like them. I’ve even seen tattoos!

DAVIS: I’m curious about your past pseudonym P. Revess. Where did this come from and where did it go?

KUPPERMAN: It was just the prefect pseudonym I came up with— mysterious, ambisexual — and I stopped using it because some dumb editor at New York Press told me I should just use one name, my own. And I was an idiot and listened to her.

DAVIS: Were your parents supportive as you pursued a career as an artist?

KUPPERMAN: Yes. I don’t know if they saw it coming but they’ve adjusted well.

DAVIS: What type of art were you interested in when you attended art school?

KUPPERMAN: Basically anything and everything (still am):What I didn’t know was how I should fit into it all...

DAVIS: How were you first exposed to surrealism and dadaism?

KUPPERMAN: Through Alice in Wonderland and books like that, but I think it’s just part of the culture now. Comedy now has a strong strain of surrealism in it.

DAVIS: What has kept you interested in surreal humor?

KUPPERMAN: It’s what I respond to. I love idioms sliding into each other and situations that melt and transform: dream logic, where meaning shifts and overturns.

DAVIS: You’ve talked about being influenced by sketch comedy shows, Monty Python and SCTV. A few years ago you had the chance to write some sketches for The Peter Serafinowicz Show. Was that a pretty easy adjustment for you?

KUPPERMAN: It wasn’t an easy situation, because I was so far away. The real writing action was taking place in London, and I was in New York. Even when an idea came from me — the whole acting-class thing, which in my version was with Michael Caine —it would be so heavily re-written that it wasn’t so much mine anymore. That’s just the way things work. I’d love to try again on a more level playing field.

DAVIS: I know you’ve talked a little about this before. But can you discuss some of your experiences writing scripts for DC — Any differences in your process? Any challenges? Any new creative avenues it allowed you to explore?

KUPPERMAN: It was frustrating — the more of those comics I did, the less rewarding it became. The very first one — a Jetsons story where Mr. Spacely becomes a baby— was probably the best. But the editing became more and more severe. The last story I did was a Scooby-Doo — they even changed the name of a character I wrote from Murderous Pete to Homeless Pete! I didn’t pursue it after that.

DAVIS: You’ve called Twitter a "petri dish of comedy.” For you, is the Internet mostly helpful or distracting?

KUPPERMAN: Helpful, but you have to limit your exposure or depression will result. I do love Twitter and the people I’ve met on there, and I try not to let it prevent me working.

DAVIS: You’re currently producing a weekly comic called Up All Night. Will any of these strips or related strips be featured in future issues of Thrizzle?

KUPPERMAN: Perhaps some of them…

DAVIS: In an interview last year you mentioned a potential project with Adult Swim after the Snake ’N’ Bacon pilot wasn’t picked up. Can you elaborate on that at all?

KUPPERMAN: Yes- they hired me to develop a horror pilot. But by the time I had characters and a scenario their attention had completely drifted away. This happened to a lot of talented and well-known comedy people last year, so I’m not alone! Dealing with Adult Swim is like trying to talk to someone peaking on an acid trip. You never know what they’ll say or do next...

DAVIS: Between TV Funhouse and the Snake ’N’ Bacon pilot, you’ve done quite a bit of work in animation. How do you feel about the current state of animation?

KUPPERMAN: I am indifferent, since I’m not involved. There really isn’t anything that’s compelling me to watch lately...

DAVIS: Many alternative cartoonists have transitioned into animation and videogames. How interested are you in pursuing jobs in different media?

KUPPERMAN: I’m only interested as long I continue to exist as an artist! So it has to be on my terms to some extent. I had that with the S&B pilot, which is why it was so amazing. I drew every inch of the animation, that’s why it looks the way it does. But I have a horror of producing crap, and unfortunately most media product ends up being just that.

DAVIS: How does your work reflect what’s going on across media, in terms of humor, today?

KUPPERMAN: I think my humor is very contiguous with the humor that’s going on now in live comedy, the better TV comedy, podcasting the smart stuff. Not comics though: I feel very alone there. Most other humor in comics is excruciating.

DAVIS: You have a serious graphic novel called Henry Spelman in the works. Can you tell us any more about that?

KUPPERMAN: Not at the moment! I’m trying to examine my options with as clear a head as possible. My bank balance is always a concern, and right now I’m just trying to stay alert. I’m hoping to get into the Spelman project soon, but it’s a matter of balancing the work against the chances of an advance in today’s publishing world, truly the worst and least hospitable ever. And I’m waiting to see how the Twain book does…

Michael Kupperman

Don't forget to catch Michael Kupperman on the "Twain in the Membrane" book tour! -- janice

Oil & Ale!
Written by Larry Reid | Filed under Steve DuinOil and WaterFantagraphics Bookstoreevents 30 Sep 2011 1:51 PM

Georgetown Brewing Company

Oil and Water and Beer and Popcorn! Drop by Fantagraphics Bookstore & Gallery on Saturday between 6 and 8 PM to meet the author of our new book Oil and Water. Manny was kind enough to donate a barrel of Georgetown's finest and Rex from Button Makers is bringing over his popcorn machine. Good times. 

Twain in the Membrane: Kupperman at the Mark Twain House
Written by janice headley | Filed under Michael Kuppermanevents 30 Sep 2011 8:13 AM

Michael Kupperman IN THE HOUSE, ya'll!

No. He really is.

Michael Kupperman is bringing Mark Twain's Autobiography 1910-2010 to the historical Mark Twain House & Museum this Saturday, October 1st.

No. HE REALLY IS.

Mark Twain and his family moved into this self-designed manor in Hartford, Connecticut back in 1874, and since 2003, the Mark Twain House & Museum have offered guests, "an opportunity to learn more about Mark Twain, his family, the historic house, and the author's legacy." Well, what could be a more perfect location for a Kupperman reading than this???

Join Kupperman this Saturday at 7:30 PM at the Mark Twain House & Museum [ 351 Farmington Avenue, Hartford, CT ] for what's sure to be a historical event in itself!

And stay tuned to the FLOG for more dates in the Twain in the Membrane fall tour!

More Dylan Williams benefit auctions: Clowes, Eaton, Kerlow, Romberger
Written by Mike Baehr | Filed under Victor KerlowJeremy EatonJames Rombergergood deedsDaniel Clowes 30 Sep 2011 2:09 AM

Ice Haven sketches - Dan Clowes

The comics community continues to come together to aid the family of late Sparkplug Comics publisher Dylan Williams, with a new round of benefit auctions featuring artwork donated by its creators organized by Floating World's Jason Leivian and Profanity Hill's (and Fantagraphics') Jason T. Miles. The marquee item of the moment is Daniel Clowes's cover sketches for the hardcover edition of Ice Haven, and more wonderful contributions from Fantagraphics artists follow below. Click each image to be taken directly to the eBay auction, and see additional contributions at The Divine Invasion blog.

Jeremy Eaton's "Richie":

Richie - Jeremy Eaton

Victor Kerlow 's "Second Variety":

Second Variety - Victor Kerlow

James Romberger's "Transient Wake":

Transient Wake - James Romberger

Things to See: Dash Shaw & Jesse Moynihan's Believer strip Spiritual Dad
Written by Mike Baehr | Filed under Things to seeJesse MoynihanDash Shaw 30 Sep 2011 12:23 AM

Spiritual Dad

There's a great bonus at the end of Frank Santoro's interview with Jesse Moynihan at The Comics Journal: a scan of Jesse and Dash Shaw's fold-out story Spiritual Dad that came as an insert with the May 2010 issue of The Believer. If you haven't read it yet, by gum, you oughta.

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