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Kristy Valenti's Blog
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Umpteen Millionaire Club: Discussion Questions for The Love Bunglers
Written by Kristy Valenti | Filed under Umpteen Millionaire ClubThe Love BunglersJaime Hernandez 26 Jun 2014 11:43 AM
The Love Bunglers by Jaime Hernandez

[The Umpteen Millionaire Club is our series which puts forth book club discussion questions for Fantagraphics titles. The Comics Journal interns Caroline Sibila, Lucy Kiester, and Daniel Johnson put together this set of questions. As this is intended for those who have read the book and contains spoilers, questions can be found behind the jump. - Ed.]

Jaime Hernandez's The Love Bunglers focuses on Maggie (a.k.a. Perla) Chascarrillo: the graphic novel is full of her old friends, estranged family members, and visits to art exhibitions. Maggie's present is interspersed with flashbacks to the Chascarrillo family's brief move to Cadezza and fraught return to Hoppers. Hernandez's expressive art depicts relationships evolving, and adds new dimensions to older stories. The Love Bunglers serves as both an extension of and an introduction to the Love and Rockets universe.

[Read more...]


Umpteen Millionaire Club: Nijigahara Holograph
Written by Kristy Valenti | Filed under Umpteen Millionaire ClubmangaInio Asano 7 Mar 2014 6:53 PM

Nijigahara Holograph by Inio Asano

[The Umpteen Millionaire Club is our series which puts forth book club discussion questions for Fantagraphics titles. The Comics Journal interns Keith Barbalato, Lucy Kiester, and Daniel Johnson put together this set of questions. As this is intended for those who have read the book and may contain spoilers, questions can be found behind the jump. - Ed.]

Inio Asano's Nijigahara Holograph cuts back and forth between two timelines, filling in details bit by bit: events ripple throughout a town and take their toll for years to come, resulting in violence and sexual guilt. A foreboding force circulates among a community following a woman's suicide. A group of students put a classmate, Arié, into a coma. As troubled new student Amahiko attempts to make friends at school, his life intertwines with the cycle of assault and death.

[Read more...]


Pretty in Ink: Acknowledgments
Written by Kristy Valenti | Filed under Trina Robbinserrata 6 Dec 2013 2:22 PM

Pretty in Ink: North American Women Cartoonists 1896-2013 by Trina Robbins

From the editor: Unfortunately, Trina Robbins' acknowledgments were accidentally ommitted from her new book, Pretty in Ink: North American Women Cartoonists 1886-2013.

They will be included in the (knock on wood) next printing. Until then, Trina Robbins:

A heartfelt thank you to Kyle Ryan, Ellen Klages, Shaun Clancy, Jonathan Warm Day Coming, Patrick Ford, Bill McGrath, Christine Chambers, and Allan Holtz (and his great website, http://strippersguide.blogspot.com), for the priceless material that they provided; to Alexa Dickman, for her detective work that resulted in my finding Fran Hopper; and to Steve Leialoha, for putting together the pieces. This would still be a book without them, but it would not be half as good a book.

A special thank you to Alex Jay for his information on Katherine Patterson Rice, and for clearing up the Jean Mohr gender mystery; Jean Mohr, who was included in all my past books, is a man!

Umpteen Millionaire Club: Jim Woodring's Fran
Written by Kristy Valenti | Filed under Umpteen Millionaire ClubJim Woodring 6 Dec 2013 12:39 PM

Fran by Jim Woodring

[The Umpteen Millionaire Club is our series which puts forth book club discussion questions for Fantagraphics titles. The Comics Journal interns Keith Baralato, Eli Powell, and Evans Winters put together this set of questions. - Ed.]

Written by Keith Barbalato, Lillian Beaty, and Sonya Selbach

Rendered in vivid black and white (though it evokes psychedelia), Fran: The Preceding and Continuing Congress of the Animals depicts a story of love, loss, and healing - all in wordless panels. From one page to the next, Woodring builds a fantastical world Frank readers will be familiar with: the Unifactor is the landscape against which Fran and Frank's love plays out. In Fran, the impetuous titular character drags reluctant Frank along on adventures that clearly depict two very different people trying to find common ground, despite Frank's wish for total honesty and Fran's desire for complete privacy.

What effect does having no words in this comic have?

What does the mysterious "memory device" represent?

Why is Fran so against having this "memory device" on, and why is Frank so forceful about her wearing it?

Do Fran and Frank transcend gender roles? If so, how does Woodring depict this?

What is the nature of their relationship?

How do their personalities complement each other, and how do they clash?

How do Fran and Frank interact differently with their environment?

Who is the "many-eyed-man"?

How would you characterize Frank's relationship with his pets?

What purpose do the pets serve in Woodring's narratives?

In the end, why is Frank so happy to be home?

Umpteen Millionaire Club: Ulli Lust's Today Is the Last Day of the Rest of Your Life
Written by Kristy Valenti | Filed under Umpteen Millionaire ClubUlli Lust 12 Sep 2013 5:45 PM

Today Is the Last Day of the Rest of Your Life by Ulli Lust

[The Umpteen Millionaire Club is our series which puts forth book club discussion questions for Fantagraphics titles. The Comics Journal interns Keith Baralato, Eli Powell, and Evans Winters put together this set of questions. - Ed.]

Today Is the Last Day of the Rest of Your Life is a graphic memoir by Ulli Lust, set in the 1980s, which recounts her journey from Vienna, Austria, down through Italy, finally arriving on the island of Sicily. Seventeen-year-old “Ulli” lives on the streets, traveling with nothing but her best friend Edi, a sleeping bag, and barely enough money to buy a coffee. This rebellious young woman lives a life free of possessions or concern for the future as she interacts with fellow vagabonds, junkies, prostitutes, and even the Sicilian mob.

Discussion Questions:

  1. What motivates Ulli to travel?
  2. Early on, Ulli states that she wants to “accumulate as much experience as possible, to meet as many people as possible” (34). How successful is she in this goal?
  3. How does Ulli’s life on the streets differ from the people she meets who are more permanently rooted in poverty, homelessness, drugs, and hustling?
  4. What impact do the people she meets have on her? (List of Characters: Edi, Andreas, Dieter, Guido, Frankie, Gino, Paolo, Marc, etc.)
  5. How does Ulli’s gender affect her position as a traveler?
  6. What purpose do Ulli’s journal entries serve?
  7. How does Ulli’s vision of herself and/or what she will become match up with how you viewed the character?
  8. How does Lust use metaphorical imagery to tell her story? What effect do these techniques have on the reader as far as understanding Ulli’s inner life/experience?
  9. Does Ulli live as if today is the last day of the rest of her life? How does her attitude toward this idea change throughout the story?
  10. On the last page of the book, why does Ulli crawl out of her bed onto the floor to sleep?  What does the bed symbolize for Ulli?
Love and Holograms
Written by Kristy Valenti | Filed under Love and RocketsJaime HernandezGilbert Hernandez 6 Aug 2013 4:57 PM

While I was working on The Love and Rockets Companion: 30 Years (and Counting) I noticed this contribution to the Love and Rockets #11 (April 1985) letters page signed “Christy Marx.”

lnr11.jpg

Dear Bros. Hernandez,

Hmmm . . . how to tell you how great this comic is without sounding like a raving fan. Fuck it! You guys deserve raves.

“Mechanics” is the best, closely followed by “Heartbreak Soup” in all its incarnations. “Errata Stigmata” I can do without, frankly.

I read the first seven issues all at once, having come in late, drawn by growing word-of-mouth, plus the look of them began to fascinate me more and more. My regular dealer doesn’t carry them, unfortunately, because he’s limited in the amount of product he can purchase and he has drawn the line for some reason. I imagine you’ve encountered this barrier before and it must be a frustrating problem for you. It’s easy enough for me to subscribe, but beyond word-of-mouth, there should be a way for your books to get more attention.

Time and again, I’ve suggested to people in the business that we need to reach out for newer audiences. I get blank looks or disagreement, but I’m convinced that you could attract a much wider and less comic-book-oriented audience.

I believe this not because it appeals so much to me (I read virtually everything published), but because I’ve watched a 20-year-old woman from Australia (who does not normally read comics) get hooked on these books, and if you can reach across that kind of a personal and cultural gap, then you’re obviously succeeding in a big way.

She and I love the art in “Mechanics,” especially because of your amazingly keen awareness of what’s contemporary. I can honestly say you’re about the only people doing comics today that have this awareness, and God! Is it refreshing to see! All of the art works in its own way. It grows on one.

Then there’s the writing. Excellent! You all have the most wonderful gift for creating living, breathing characters! Better than anything happening elsewhere in comics today. I’m astounded at your ability to portray such vivid female characters with such understanding. Maggie and Hopey are delightful, Penny is great fun, Izzy is weird. Luba and Archie and all the rest come across beautifully real.

I love your touches of humor and am intrigued by the religious motifs that run throughout. I’ve learned a lot about Hispanic thought, life, and feeling from these books. At the same time, you’ve created characters and situations that are universal. And there you have the reasons it works so well.

Not to mention all the fun you have using an alternate reality. That threw me for the first few issues until it suddenly clicked what you were on about. And please continue to add the translations for us poor gringos and gringas out here. We need the education.

Well, I guess I’ve raved on enough. Love your books and hope they rocket you to fame and fortune.

All the best,

Christy Marx (address withheld)

I was a huge fan of Jem and the Holograms growing up, so I decided to e-mail her to see if one of the creative forces behind the cartoon (and writer of the recent Amethyst: Princess of Gemworld miniseries) and the letter writer were one and the same.

She replied:

Hello, fellow Kristy,

Now this is an interesting piece of e-mail. I was forced to dig through my box of L&R and find the issue you’re talking about.

Even after reading the letter, I confess I have no recollection of writing it, though I did commonly write letters to comics in the ’70s, tapering off in the '80s. But I can say it was me for a couple of reasons: a) it sounds exactly like what I would have written (including the F-word); and b) I referenced my Australian stepdaughter. The issue was printed in 1985 when she would have been the age mentioned in the letter.   

That was fun, thanks!

Christy Marx
www.christymarx.com


The Umpteen Millionaire Club: Discussion Questions for Julio's Day
Written by Kristy Valenti | Filed under Umpteen Millionaire ClubGilbert Hernandez 3 May 2013 5:23 PM

Julio's Day by Gilbert Hernandez

[The Umpteen Millionaire Club is our series which puts forth book club discussion questions for Fantagraphics titles. The Comics Journal interns Brooke Chin, Tom Graham and Toby Liebowitz put together this set of questions. As this is intended for those who have read the book and contains spoilers, questions can be found behind the jump. - Ed.]

Julio’s Day is a graphic novel by Gilbert Hernandez that spans the hundred-year life of one man. It opens with his birth; it follows Julio and his family and friends in a small farming village as successive generations are born and die. Packed within the pages is a range of human experience: a soldier goes to war and is changed; evil in the family goes unaddressed; and there’s the blue worm. We follow Julio to the end, which is much as the beginning, or, to quote Samuel Beckett, "the same day, the same second."

[Read more...]


The Umpteen Millionaire Club: Discussion Questions for The Heart of Thomas
Written by Kristy Valenti | Filed under Umpteen Millionaire ClubMoto Hagiomanga 4 Feb 2013 6:56 PM

The Heart of Thomas (トーマの心臓 / Thomas no Shinzō) by Moto Hagio

[The Umpteen Millionaire Club, our series which puts forth book club discussion questions for Fantagraphics titles, turns its attention to The Heart of Thomas by Moto HagioThe Comics Journal interns Tom Graham, Nomi Kane and Jack McKean put together this set of questions. – Ed.]

Summary:

The Heart of Thomas is a manga by Moto Hagio about students in a German boarding school for boys. The boys deal with tragic death, romantic love amongst each other and have more lighthearted concerns about popularity, rumors and cliques.

Questions:

How does the story address gender conventions or stereotypes?

How do the characters deal with complex emotions that they seem too young to handle, such as unrequited love, intense guilt and/or feeling culpable?

How does the story portray dealing with loss?

Discuss the use of Christian imagery and how it impacts your reading of the story.

Is there abuse going on in this story? If so, how do you respond to the way it's portrayed?

What visual devices does the cartoonist use to indicate narrative techniques such as foreshadowing, symbolism, flashback, etc.?

Discuss Hagio's choice to set the story in Germany. How might it be important (or not?).

The Heart of Thomas was originally published in 1974 and based on a 1964 French movie, which in turn was based on the 1943 semi-autobiographical French novel Les amitiés particulières. How might you read it differently given its historical context? Does this impact your reading of the story?

How do the characters' relationships with their parents figure into the broader story and their personalities and desires?

Does this book have a message? If so, what might its message be?

Talk About Yer Primary Sources
Written by Kristy Valenti | Filed under The Go-GosEric Reynolds 23 Nov 2012 4:00 PM

Best proofreading comment ever.

The Umpteen Millionaire Club: Discussion Questions for Barack Hussein Obama
Written by Kristy Valenti | Filed under Umpteen Millionaire ClubSteven Weissman 2 Nov 2012 4:25 PM

Barack Hussein Obama by Steven Weissman

[For this installment of The Umpteen Millionaire Club (which perhaps should be renamed The Umpteen 1% Club for the occasion), The Comics Journal interns Kristen Bisson, Aiden Fitzgerald, Tom Graham, Janice Lee & Anna Pederson put together this series of discussion questions about Barack Hussein Obama by Steven Weissman for use in book clubs. – Ed.]

Summary:

Barack Hussein Obama is a collection of absurdist four-panel gag strips featuring the Head of State, his family and numerous political friends and foes.

Barack Hussein Obama Book Club Questions:

What does this book have to say about Obama’s role as a statesman and/or figurehead?

Is this book making a political statement? If so, what is that statement?

Discuss the significance of characters’ transformations: i.e. head sizes, into birds, into trees.

What effect does showing the characters’ personal lives — even fictionally — have on our view of their political lives?

What picture does the book paint about the future of politics?

How is religion portrayed?

What does the book say about media culture in politics?

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