Home arrow Blogs & News arrow FLOG! Blog

Search / Login

Quick Links:
Latest Releases
Browse by Artist
Love and Rockets Guide
Peanuts books
Disney books
More browsing options under "Browse Shop" above


Search: All Titles

Advanced Search
Login / Free Registration
Detail Search
Download Area
Show Cart
Your Cart is currently empty.

Subscribe

Sign up for our email newsletters for updates on new releases, events, special deals and more.

New Releases

Jim
Jim
$29.99
Add to Cart

Tales Designed to Thrizzle Vol. 1 [Softcover Ed.]
Tales Designed to Thrizzle Vol. 1 [Softcover Ed.]
$22.99
Add to Cart

Megahex
Megahex
$29.99
Add to Cart

Hip Hop Family Tree Vol. 2: 1981-1983
Hip Hop Family Tree Vol. 2: 1981-1983
$27.99
Add to Cart

all new releases

Upcoming Arrivals

Walt Disney's Uncle Scrooge and Donald Duck: The Son of the Sun (The Don Rosa Library Vol. 1) [Pre-Order - U.S./CANADA ONLY]
Walt Disney's Uncle Scrooge and Donald Duck: The Son of the Sun (The Don Rosa Library Vol. 1) [Pre-Order - U.S./CANADA ONLY]
Price: $29.99

An Age of License [Pre-Order]
An Age of License [Pre-Order]
Price: $19.99

Snoopy's Thanksgiving [Pre-Order]
Snoopy's Thanksgiving [Pre-Order]
Price: $9.99

more upcoming titles...
 

Category >> Bill Griffith

MoCCA in photos - All the photos
Written by Jen Vaughn | Filed under Ulli LustNoah Van SciverLinda MedleyLeslie SteinKim DeitchJohnny RyanJoe DalyJames RombergerJacques TardiGilbert HernandezGary GrothEC ComicsDrew FriedmanDiane NoominDavid WojnarowiczDash ShawChuck ForsmanCharles BurnsBill Griffith 15 Apr 2013 12:59 PM

EC Books
MoCCA was a BLAST, as usual. PR Director, Jacq Cohen, and I showed up early on Friday to set up the table. People couldn't wait for Saturday, clumping around the new books. Our two newest EC Comics Library releases featuring Al Williamson and Jack Davis' work are creating a heartbreakingly beautiful rainbow. 

MoCCA
One side of the set-up table!

Fantagraphics table
Friday night was Dash Shaw's opening for his New School art exhibition and 30th birthday at Desert Island. His fianceé (sorry, ladies and germs) made a cake that was uber-delicious. Below, Dash talks about his new comics.

Dash at Desert Island
Party hardy, Gabrielle Bell is talking to Ariel Shrag (!) in the left-hand corner. 

Desert Island
A gentleman was purchasing Julio's Day by Gilbert Hernandez at Desert Island so we had to compliment him on his exquisite taste. Lo and behold, Tony (or so he says) showed up at MoCCA the next day ready to buy more quality comics, this time Castle Waiting Vol. 1 by Linda Medley. My mom would be so proud that I'm still somewhat polite!

Tony Tony with Castle Waiting
I ran into a familiar face, cartoonist and animation intern Andrew Greenstone, who was more than willing to hang out and shot the shit---I mean, talk business.

Andrew Greenstone and Jen Vaughn
If I ever become a comic book store owner, I hope I'm as cool as Gabe Fowler. The red print was a Desert Island exclusive!

Gabe Fowler
The next day MoCCA started out with the great Bill Griffith signing new copies of Zippy: The Dingburg Diaries

Bill and fan
Cartoonist Charles Burns showed up to hang out with friends and look at comics. I never ever tire of that man's company, but he did mention some people are reticent to eat with him because of what he draws in his comics. FOOLS, I say! Also, Evan Dorkin makes Chris Duffy guffaw in the background. Doesn't "Griffith, Dorkin, Duffy and Burns" sound like an amazing lawfirm? Like possibly corrupt but they probably have a pastry chef on staff to appease their clients?

Griffith, Dorkin, Duffy and Burns
Also signing at MoCCA was Kim Deitch, whose new book The Amazing, Enlightening and Absolutely True Adventures of Katherine Whaley is coming out soon and is haunting, to put it mildly. Kim Deitch and Bill Griffith
Deitch brought his original pages which fans poured over. Kim Deitch and fans
James Romberger
and Marguerite Van Cook made their Fantagraphics signing debut for 7 Miles a Second, the moving comic written by David Wojnarowicz. The book has one of those covers that is both oblique and arresting (Jacq adds up some quick math on the right). While I did not stop a child from picking up the book, I did tell a parent or two it had adult material in it. One of my favorite sells of the weekend was selling Prison Pit Book Two to a 14 year old kid whose mom seemed dubious until I brought up the philosophy behind the book. The teen gave me a giant wink as he left, he might not get it still.

James, Marguerite and Jacq
Van Cook discussed innovative printing techniques from their travels and non-profit advice while James would sketch in signed copies of the book. 

7 Miles a Second
Recently, Alex Dueben talked to Romberger for Comic Book Resources and stopped to meet them in person.  

Romberger, Van Cook and Dueben
Next up was Leslie and Dash! Local cartoonist Leslie Stein is also in a pretty crazy fun band, Prince Rupert's Drops. If you live in the New York area, check them out. The rest of us will just live via our headphones or listening to their tracks on the recent AudioFemme interview. Leslie signed my old copy of Eye of the Majestic Creature and we talked about second book that's coming out this fall! I heard some comments from other cartoonists that they feel weird about asking fellow toonies to sign their books but I don't give a humdinkle about that. Make it FANCY for me.

Leslie Stein
Dash signed the spine of many a Bottomless Belly Button and cover of 3 New Stories for eager fans. Those gorgeous red prints (you can only see a quarter of it) are available from Desert Island if you are looking for something for the Shaw fan who 'has it all.' 

Dash Shaw signs
One of the favorite books of the con was Today is the Last Day of the Rest of Your Life by Ulli Lust. Mk Reed confessed to reading the original edition with an English translation, she was so eager. Here, Carl Antonowicz expresses something...yes, it's joy at the book!

Ulli Lust's book and Carl Antonowicz
Publishers Weekly's Cal Reid looks great in his Love and Rockets shirt (Virtual Memories podcast host, Gil Roth suited up behind him).

Cal Reid
Really loved that Bill Griffith whipped out some future Zippy strips (for May!) during a lull during his signings. No big deal.

Zippy Panels
Self Made Hero
cartoonist JAKe (according to the internet) is a huge Drew Friedman fan, he just can't take great photos.

Drew Friedman
Given our close proximity to the stairs to the bathroom, there wasn't much chance for wondering down aisles or buying comics. I really wanted to read L. Nichols' Flocks and she was helpful enough to COME TO ME with her Square for my plastic purchase.

L. Nichols
Tucker Stone, of TCJ and Bergen Street Comics, came by to get Gary's signature on a copy of The Comics Journal. Pretty cute, right?

Tucker Stone and Gary Groth
Jacq and me with two of our debut books by Ulli Lust and Gilbert Hernandez! Photo by Dre Grigoropol.

Jen and Jacq
Hung with bossman Gary Groth, Dash, Leslie and Jacq one night. 

Gary Groth, Dash Shaw, Jen Vaughn, Leslie Stein, Jacq Cohen
Charles Forsman
was out and about with his Oily Comics micropublishing outfit. Chuck's comic, The End of the Fucking World, will be out this July from Fantagraphics in one single beautiful book. I'm so excited about that. We in no way support NCIS.

Jen Vaughn and Chuck Forsman
Chuck and I go way back, we used to work at the same graphic novel library together in Vermont. A photo from 2009:

 Jen and Chuck
Speaking of libraries, the next day Tom Spurgeon and I visited Columbia University's Butler Library and Rare Book room, led around by enthusiastic librarian Karen Green. It was so very cool to see our books with library binding but they've also perfected a myler binding so we don't lose those cool spine designs. Shaw's Bottomless Belly Button and Noah Van Sciver's The Hypo.

Library binding  Library binding
Kim, I didn't forget about you, the library has a lot of Jacques Tardi books. Some were checked out, which is even better than finding them at the library.

Tardi  Jen and Jacques Tardi 
A grand place I hope to visit again.  Thanks to Anelle Miller and her trusty band of volunteers for the enjoyable convention, Gary and Jacq for booth help plus a few of these photos. Lastly, another one of my favorite moments of the week was selling Dungeon Quest Book One to a gentleman on Saturday who came back Sunday to buy the other two after reading the first in one sitting. It was a cherry on top of an awesome convention.

Gary Groth

Fantagraphics at MoCCA 2013 in NYC!
Written by janice headley | Filed under Samuel R DelanyMia WolffMarguerite Van CookLeslie SteinKim DeitchJames RombergerGuy PeellaerteventsEC ComicsDash ShawBill GriffithBarnaby 1 Apr 2013 11:00 AM

MoCCA 2013

Fantagraphics is excited to be attending the 2013 MoCCA Arts Festival on Saturday, April 6th and Sunday, April 7th at the Lexington Avenue Armory in New York City!

We've got so many beautiful debuts in store for you -- in very limited quantities, so make our table your first stop:

3 New Stories by Dash Shaw

New School by Dash Shaw (UPDATE: A slight delay at the printer means this will miss the festival. Sorry!)

Zippy: The Dingburg Diaries by Bill Griffith

Barnaby Vol. 1 by Crockett Johnson; edited by Eric Reynolds and Philip Nel

The Amazing, Enlightening and Absolutely True Adventures of Katherine Whaley by Kim Deitch

50 Girls 50 and Other Stories (The EC Comics Library) illustrated by Al Williamson et al.; written by Al Feldstein et al.

'Tain't the Meat... It's the Humanity! and Other Stories (The EC Comics Library) illustrated by Jack Davis; written by Al Feldstein

The Adventures of Jodelle by Guy Peellaert & Pierre Bartier

Julio's Day by Gilbert Hernandez

Bread & Wine by Samuel R. Delany and Mia Wolff (UPDATE: A slight delay at the printer means this will miss the festival. Sorry!)


And get those beauties signed by your favorite artists!

SATURDAY
Bill Griffith                              11:30-12:30 PM
Dash Shaw                               12:30-2:00 PM
James Romberger                   3:30-5:00 PM
Kim Deitch                              2:00-3:30 PM
Leslie Stein                              12:30-2:00 PM
Marguerite Van Cook              3:30-5:00 PM

SUNDAY
Bill Griffith                              1:30-3:00 PM
Dash Shaw                               3:00-4:30 PM
James Romberger                  12:00-1:30 PM
Kim Deitch                              1:30-3:00 PM
Leslie Stein                               3:00-4:30 PM
Marguerite Van Cook              12:00-1:30 PM

You can also join Bill Griffith for a panel on Saturday:

Saturday, April 6th // 1:00 - 2:00 PM
Guest of Honor Bill Griffith in conversation with Paul Di Filippo [in the Programming Room in the Lower Level]


Where will all these wonderful books and artists be, you might be wondering? Why, tables B64, B65, C80, C81 -- right in front as you walk through the main entrance! (See a bigger version of this map here.) Our PR/Marketing duo of Jacq & Jen will be happy to see you at MoCCA!

















Daily OCD: 2/20/13
Written by Jen Vaughn | Filed under Tom KaczynskiShimura TakakoRon Regé JrRich TommasoNo Straight LinesMoto HagioJustin HallGeorge HerrimanDaily OCDBill Griffith 20 Feb 2013 7:17 PM

The newest office of Online Commentaries & Diversions: 

The Heart of Thomas

• Review: Glen Weldon from NPR Books pontificates on the wondrous LGBT-centric graphic novels and reviewed Moto Hagio's The Heart of Thomas "…whenever the emotions roiling just under her narrative's surface threaten to overtake her characters, Hagio's otherwise exacting and detailed art goes expressively feathery at the edges, like a ghost vanishing softly into the ether."

• Review: Fantasy Book Review reviews The Heart of Thomas by Moto Hagio. "This is not an uplifting tale until at the end, but it is a very well drawn period manga that gives glimpses of what boys that age would have felt being in such an enclosed place. There is a sense of Oscar Wilde about the whole school, but that depends on your impression of the piece," writes Sandra Scholes.

 Wandering Son Vol. 1 No Straight Lines

• Review: Glen Weldon from NPR Books pontificates on the wondrous LGBT-centric graphic novels and reviewed Wandering Son Vol. 1 by Shimura Takako. "Takako presents their stories with admirable sensitivity and restraint.…"

• Review: Glen Weldon from NPR Books pontificates on the wondrous LGBT-centric graphic novels and reviewed No Straight Lines edited by Justin Hall. "From Stonewall and the AIDS crisis to the terrifying specter of domesticity, this clear-eyed, unsentimental collection demonstrates the extent to which, for LGBT people, the personal and the political have always bled together."

The Cartoon Utopia

• Review: Comics Bulletin looks at The Cartoon Utopia by Ron Regé Jr. "With this book, Ron Regé has emerged as comics' answer to Walt Whitman.…Thankfully, Regé's overarching concept -- that a vivid and transcendent comic book experience is within our grasp, if we're willing -- is not a hard one to understand at all." says R.J. Ryan. 

The Cavalier Mr. Thompson

• Review: Grovel and Andy Shaw look at The Cavalier Mr. Thompson by Rich Tommaso. "The story is wonderfully told. It has the feel of a classic movie, something from a bygone era…complete with the usual cast of chancers, crooks and have-a-go heroes.…It’s a thoroughly enjoyable book, with a stunning backdrop and a deeply believable and interesting cast."

Bill Griffith

• Plug: Alan Wood asks R. Crumb about Bill Griffith. Crumb stated, "He's about the only guy in America who's doing a readable, interesting daily comic strip for daily newspapers. He' s the only one left, as far as I know. I don't know of any others."

Krazy Kat

• Review: Dutch magazine Knack Focus recently ran a review of George Herriman 's work. Kim Thompson read it, translated it in his synapse-heavy polyglottal mind and said this: "Here's a nice five-star review (in Dutch) of the gorgeous new French edition of KRAZY KAT, created from the Fantagraphics edition. The article is mostly a pocket summary of KRAZY, although it does point out that Herriman's unique approach to language have made the strip virtually untranslatable (forcing European readers to fall back on the English language versions)... until, at least for francophones, now."

 

Cover Uncovered: Zippy: The Dingburg Diaries by Bill Griffith
Written by Mike Baehr | Filed under Zippy the PinheadComing AttractionsBill Griffith 11 Feb 2013 2:03 PM

Zippy: The Dingburg Diaries by Bill Griffith

Surely we're having fun by now! It's our 11th (!) collection of Bill Griffith's Zippy the PinheadThe Dingburg Diaries, wrapping up production and going to the printer for release in May or so. With two and a half years' worth of daily and color Sunday strips under chapter headings like "Beatniks, Bowling, Laundry & Food," "Mr. The Toad," "Little Zippy," "Art, Music & Comics," "Zerbina & Other Relationships," and "God," you know it's got the good stuff you want. Plus the back cover is maybe one of the greatest Zippy drawings ever. Pour yourself a tall glass of taco sauce and take a gander at 21 pages' worth of strips right here.

Undergroundhog Day Sale 2013 - 30% Off Underground Comix!
Written by Mike Baehr | Filed under Victor MoscosoVaughn BodeSpain Rodriguezsales specialsRobert WilliamsRobert CrumbRand HolmesMalcolm McNeillKim DeitchJoyce FarmerJack JacksonFrank StackBill Griffith 1 Feb 2013 3:57 PM

Undergroundhog Day

Take the plunge! Starting right now and running through Sunday, February 3, 2013, it's the third annual edition of our "Undergroundhog Day" Sale with at least 30% OFF almost every book and comic in our Underground Comix category, including books by R. Crumb, Kim Deitch, Joyce Farmer, Bill Griffith, Rand Holmes, Jack Jackson, Victor Moscoso, Spain Rodriguez, Frank Stack, Robert Williams and more! Yes, this includes new and recent books like Your Vigor for Life Appalls Me: Robert Crumb Letters 1958-1977Jack Jackson's American History: Los Tejanos & Lost Cause, Malcolm McNeill's The Lost Art of Ah Pook Is Here, Diane Noomin's Glitz-2-Go, and Spain Rodriguez's Cruisin' with the Hound, plus to-be-released books like upcoming reprints of The Complete Crumb Comics volumes (and don't forget, most of our Crumb books come with an option for an exclusive signed bookplate)! The sale starts now and continues through the weekend. (Discount not valid at Fantagraphics Bookstore & Gallery.)

What's in the January 2013 Diamond Previews
Written by Mike Baehr | Filed under Zippy the PinheadSamuel R DelanyPrince ValiantMichael J VassalloMia WolffLinda MedleyKim DeitchHal FosterDiamondComing AttractionsCathy MalkasianBlake BellBill GriffithAlexander Theroux 8 Jan 2013 5:19 PM

Shipping March 2013 from Fantagraphics Books

This month's Diamond Previews catalog is out now and in it you'll find our usual 2-page spread (download the PDF) with our releases scheduled to arrive in your local comic shop in March 2013 (give or take — release dates are likely to have changed since the issue went to press). We're pleased to offer additional and updated information about these upcoming releases here on our website, to help shops and customers alike make more informed ordering decisions.

We have two Spotlight items this month: The Secret History of Marvel Comics by Blake Bell & Dr. Michael J. Vassallo, revealing the tawdry pulp origins of the comic company that they'd like you to forget about, and Bread & Wine, a new edition of the unusual and groundbreaking love story/memoir by Samuel R. Delany & Mia Wolff. The new expanded and relettered Castle Waiting Vol. 2: Definitive Edition by Linda Medley is "Certified Cool," and we've also got Bill Griffith's new Zippy collection The Dingburg Diaries, Cathy Malkasian's sequel graphic novel Wake Up, Percy Gloom, Kim Deitch's brand new original graphic novel The Amazing, Enlightening and Absolutely True Adventures of Katherine Whaley, and the paperback of Alexander Theroux's mammoth prose novel Laura Warholic. All this plus our 2013 Free Comic Book Day offering (for May), Hal Foster's Prince Valiant!

See them all here!

Daily OCD 12/11/12
Written by Jen Vaughn | Filed under Tom KaczynskiTerry ZwigoffRichard SalaPat ThomasLilli CarréJustin HallJosh SimmonsJacques TardiGary GrothDisneyDaniel ClowesDaily OCDCharles M SchulzCarol TylerCarl BarksBill Griffith 11 Dec 2012 6:27 PM
The first* glass of spiked eggnog of Online Commentaries & Diversions:
Charlie Brown's Christmas Stocking  Donald Duck: A Christmas for Shacktown The Complete Peanuts: 1985-1986

• Review: Metroland's Simcoe reviews Walt Disney's Donald Duck: A Christmas for Shacktown by Carl Barks and The Complete Peanuts: 1985 to 1986 by Charles M. Schulz. Glenn Perrett states, "Reading Carl Bark's "Donald Duck" stories from 60 years ago was entertaining. The animation and colours are excellent and sections such as "Story Notes" [etc.] . . . complement the wonderful comics making this book a nice addition to any library." And "The Complete Peanuts: 1985 to 1986 are sure to make the holidays more entertaining and makes a nice gift and keepsake."

• Review: Noel Murray of The AV Club continues the Christmas coverage with Schulz's Charlie Brown's Christmas Stocking which "is mainly meant to serve as a nice little accessory to holiday decorations, to be brought out every December with the ornaments and Andy Williams records. For that reason, it’s hard to humbug it…" With Walt Disney's Donald Duck: "A Christmas for Shacktown" by Carl Barks, Murray notes "These stories—nearly all published in the early ’50s—are mostly non-Christmas-y, but the title tale is a sweet one. . . For those who do want a surefire present for the comics buff in their lives." 

• Review: School Library Journal goes over some of the favorite holiday graphic novels of 2012 like Charlie Brown's Christmas Stocking by Charles Schulz. J. Caleb Mozzocco states "It’s beautifully designed, a breezy, five-minute read, and about the size of a Christmas card, making it a pretty great gift. And, this being Schulz’s Peanuts, it’s the sort of gift you’ll never grow out of." As for Carl Barks' holiday and title story in Walt Disney's Donald Duck: "A Christmas for Shacktown", "It’s one of about 20 of the top-notch comics in the book, which range from one-page gags to the sort of sprawling adventures Barks was best-known for."

Heads or Tails

• Review: Noel Murray of The AV Club takes a peak at Heads or Tails by Lilli Carré. "Carré loves to constrict her characters, because she knows that limiting their options won’t necessarily limit their imaginations. . . her comics work often has the feel of avant-garde cinema, as she weds surreal images to everyday situations to enchant audiences and spark ideas. . . "

• Review: Christopher Borrelli of The Chicago Tribune writes a loooong article on Lilli Carré and her new book Heads or Tails "that best captures the range, humor and vague sense of ennui she's made her name on. . . "

Beta Testing the Apocalypse

• Review: Noel Murray of The AV Club enjoys Tom Kacynski's Beta Testing the Apocalypse. "Kaczynski’s comics are frequently nightmarish, starting from a slightly askew place and then tipping further into darkness. . . But while his stories have characters and plots—often with haunting endings—they’re more like essays than conventional narratives."

You'll Never Know Book 3

• Review: Noel Murray of The AV Club finished the You'll Never Know series with Book 3: A Soldier's Heart by Carol Tyler. "This is Tyler’s magnum opus: her thoughts on art, work, relationships, music, war, and anything else that came to her mind while she was piecing together her dad’s story."

No Straight Lines   Naked Cartoonists

Plug: About.com fills in the blanks of their Christmas Sex Book List by adding our most recent titles. On No Straight Lines: Four Decades of Queer Comics edited by Justin Hall, Cory Silverberg slyly states "given the diversity of artists working today it's not a definitive collection, but it's sexy and joyful and difficult in parts, and definitely one to own." Meanwhile, Naked Cartoonists (edited by Gary Groth) contains "a number of stand outs among this overwhelmingly white, male collection of artists. And I imagine this could be a perfect gift for the right kind of comic nerd."
The Furry Trap

• Interview (audio): Dean Haspiel of Welcome to Trip City interviews Josh Simmons about The Furry Trap, Jessica Farm, living the life and accidental erections.

The Hidden

• Review: Danel Olson of the Weird Fiction Volume 3 writes on Richard Sala and The Hidden . "Sala has become one of my favorite American sequential artists because of his subtle tributes and expansions to four of the most memorable twentieth century American cartoonists - Charles Addams, Edward Gorey, Gahan Wilson, and Basil Wolverton. . .  Forbidding and weird seem like weak adjectives for Sala's The Hidden, and I urge you to open it. . . Give a standing order to Fantagraphics for any noirishly weird fictions forthcoming from Sala."

Bill GriffithL Lost and Found

• Review: Chris Estey of KEXP reviews the Bill Griffith collection called Bill Griffith: Lost and Found - Comics 1969-2003. Chris Estey writes that it is "a luxurious and generous Fantagraphics big book collection of his non-Zippy work, is required reading for those who may have missed his parodies and punk rock operas in the past, or want them all bound together. It’s also for those like me who were never really that much into Zippy in the first place."

Listen, Whitey!

• Plug: Dave Segal recants the events immediately following his Stranger article on Listen, Whitey! by Pat Thomas on the Stranger Slog. White supremacists got all sorts of angry at this history book and the white dude who wrote it.
Adele Blanc-Sec

• Plug: One step forward, two steps back. The Adele Blanc-Sec movie is inching along towards distribution in America. Johanna Draper Carlson gets the scoop on DVDs Worth Reading on Jacques Tardi's graphic novel adaptation.

Art School Confidential

• Plug: Negromancer reviews the film adaptation of Art School Confidential directed by Terry Zwigoff based on the comics of Daniel Clowes. "While Art School Confidential comes across as a satire of art schools, the faculty, and students, it is also a love story and youth relationship drama. It works well as all three."

*let's be real, it's like our tenth glass of that local dairy's eggnog

Daily OCD: 4/24-4/25/12
Written by Mike Baehr | Filed under Zippy the PinheadSpain RodriguezinterviewsDaily OCDBill Griffith 25 Apr 2012 7:15 PM

A quiet couple of days for Online Commentary & Diversions:

Cruisin' with the Hound

Plug: "I very much like Tom Spurgeon’s 'Before Before Watchmen There Was Spain Rodriguez' campaign. Rodriguez is one the of great, lively cartoonists of the last 40 years who should be enjoying comfortable golden years based on his body of work. And he’s still working, turning out good work. He has a new book out called, improbably, Cruisin’ With the Hound: The Life and Times of Fred Toote The creators position viewed through the lens of Alan Moore. Go buy a copy." – Heidi MacDonald, The Beat

Bill Griffith: Lost and Found - Comics 1969-2003

Interview (Audio): Listen to Monday night's episode of Too Much Information on WFMU, in which "Cartoonist Bill Griffith joins Benjamen Walker for an hour long conversation about Underground comics, Newspaper strips and Mainstream culture."

Daily OCD: 4/6-4/9/12
Written by Mike Baehr | Filed under Zak SallyRobert CrumbreviewsPaul NelsonOlivier SchrauwenMonte SchulzLove and RocketsKim DeitchKevin AveryinterviewsGuy PeellaertFantagraphics historyDaily OCDBill Griffith 9 Apr 2012 7:10 PM

A few days of Online Commentary & Diversions:

Everything Is an Afterthought: The Life and Writings of Paul Nelson

Review: "Everything Is an Afterthought: The Life and Writings of Paul Nelson by Salt Lake City native Kevin Avery is a fitting testimonial to a man who pioneered rock 'n' roll criticism. Those familiar and unfamiliar with the culture of the '60s will appreciate this finely written tribute.... Overall, Everything Is an Afterthought will break your heart and inspire you to be a better person. It is a wonderful story of a man who deserves his chance in the spotlight." – Shelby Scoffield, Deseret News

Excerpts: On his blog, writer Rob Trucks has a couple of bite-sized excerpts from Kevin Avery's Everything Is an Afterthought: The Life and Writings of Paul Nelson, here and here

Love and Rockets #1 [Sold Out] (Unpublished)

Review: If you've ever wondered what Tucker Stone might say about Love and Rockets #1, TCJ ahoy

The Man Who Grew His Beard

Review: "A little impenetrable in that wordless story kind of way, even when there are words. I like the stories – actually read them – but I’m more interested in studying the way each page sports a new texture or approach. The art is simply fantastic. Some stories retain a color scheme for their entirety and some switch up the limited palette within the story itself. Totally my kind of thing. I like the coloring, the line drawing, the combination of both. The graphic, printmaking quality of it and the 'classical' drawing are also attractive to me. I found myself just flipping through this collection for a long time.... High class stuff. Also, this book gets an award for best endpapers. Check it out." – Frank Santoro, The Comics Journal

Bill Griffith: Lost and Found - Comics 1969-2003

Review: "Lost and Found is the sort of retrospective project that begs summary statements. The introduction reads like a compressed memoir. The book, while extremely dense and a bit overwhelming to read, testifies to Griffith’s heroic output of underground comics, and his commitment to a lifetime of making work that is challenging, inventive, and beautifully drawn. His signature narrative discombobulation and linguistic elasticity unite all these disparate pieces into a cohesive statement of surprise and protest. It is ridiculously quotable. Also, it is very funny. Lost and Found delivers wholesale entertainment value with a socially redeeming dose of satire." – Matthew Thurber & Rebecca Bird, The Comics Journal

Interview (Audio): Inkstuds host Robin McConnell says of his latest episode, "One of the most prolific cartoonists of the underground generation, Bill Griffith, joined me to chat about his new collection, Lost and Found. It is an interesting conversation that touches on a number of different topics, ranging from his Zippy the Pinhead work, to discussing his contemporaries like Rory Hayes."

The Complete Crumb Comics Vol. 10: Crumb Advocates Violent Overthrow! [Hardcover Ed.]

Interview: Paul Gravett chatted with Robert Crumb for Art Review  magazine; he presents an unexpurgated version at his blog: "In the last few years, I’ve got so deeply involved investigating scandalous shit that goes on in modern business and culture. It’s very difficult to interpret in comics, I’m trying to figure it out. There’s not a lot of action or humour, it’s serious, grim shit. You could get your ass in trouble doing that, too. I remember when I did this thing in the Seventies, ‘Frosty the Snowman’, where I had him being this revolutionary who throws bombs at the Rockefeller mansion and shortly after that was published, the Internal Revenue Service came after me."

http://www.fantagraphics.com/images/flog/covers/2009/thumbs/bookcover_likdog.jpg

Interview: Chris Mautner's Q&A with Zak Sally at Robot 6 is a must read: "I’m no Pollyanna, nor am I a hippie; the world is NOT cut and dried with stuff like this, nor do I view it that way — if, for instance, Fantagraphics (who I love dearly) decided to print all their stuff over here, they’d probably have to kill important books by artists who don’t sell as well to ameliorate that extra cost. Or, hell, i don’t know — maybe they’d go under. Do i want either of those things? Heck no. I want Noah van Sciver and Chris Wright’s new books to get out in the world, and to reach their audience. I want Fantagraphics to be around for … forever. BUT: let’s also not fool ourselves that this 'lowest cost' imperative isn’t fucking up our world significantly, all day every day, as an economic paradigm. It’s a real thing, and that can’t be ignored either."

http://www.fantagraphics.com/images/flog/covers/2012/thumbs/9781606995303_jodelle.jpg

Profile: At HiLobrow, Norman Hathaway puts the spotlight on Guy Peellaert: "Years later I realized that Peellaert had also been responsible for one of my favorite pieces of power-pop comic art; Jodelle (and later Pravda), which plastered hip, mid-’60s fashion drawing into a dystopian landscape of the future, done in a completely different linear graphic design-based style."

The Big Town

Profile: Dan Taylor of The Press Democrat chats with Monte Schulz: "'My dad is actually mentioned in a very subtle way in The Big Town,' Schulz said. 'The main character, Harry, is in a barber shop. It says, "Back in St. Paul, he'd gotten his hair cut in the Family Barbershop on North Snelling Avenue by a cigar-smoking German fellow, whose young son drew funny little pictures."'"

Kim Deitch - self portrait

Profile (Video): Enjoy a brief video spotlight on the great Kim Deitch presented by Seth Kushner at Trip City

http://www.fantagraphics.com/images/flog/mike/201203/bestcomicsofthedecadevolifr.jpg

Tribute/History: From last week, at The Stranger, rememberances of our former art director, the late Dale Yarger

Daily OCD: 3/19-3/22/12
Written by Mike Baehr | Filed under Walt KellySteve DuinSteve DitkoSignificant ObjectsShimura TakakoShannon WheelerRobert CrumbreviewsOlivier SchrauwenMatthias WivelmangaLove and RocketsJohn BensonJasonJaime HernandezinterviewsGreg SadowskiGary PanterGahan WilsonDaily OCDCarl BarksBlake BellBill GriffithBill Everett 23 Mar 2012 1:28 AM

What happens when you have to miss a couple of days of the comics internet is that it takes you almost the whole rest of the week to get fully caught up on Online Commentary & Diversions:

Oil and Water

List: Library Journal's Martha Cornog gives a nice shout-out to Carl Barks and recommends Oil and Water by Steve Duin & Shannon Wheeler as one of "30 Graphic Novels for Earth Day 2012": "Wheeler’s atmospheric, ink-washed greys capture eccentric residents from crabbers to a pelican-rescue team, and Duin’s script catches the ironic resiliency of people exploited by the very industry that feeds them.... Valuable for high schoolers and adults as a glimpse into the crisis, and for general sensitization to environmental issues."

Pogo Vol. 1: Through the Wild Blue Wonder

Review: "When I brought Pogo home from the bookstore on a Sunday afternoon, I called my daughters over, and we lay on the floor in the living room and read it together. I read it aloud, because half of the fun of Pogo is hearing the fantastic dialogue penned by Kelly, and my daughters loved it. I’m sure there were things that went over their heads — jokes that rely on experiences they haven’t had, references to past events, wordplay that’s a little too sophisticated. But the beauty of the strip is that does work on so many levels. There’s slapstick humor, cute little talking animals, and keen observations on the human condition — the last made easier to swallow perhaps because the characters aren’t people, as human as they may be." – Jonathan Liu, Wired – GeekDad

Athos in America

Review: "[Jason] populates his tales with brightly clad cats and dogs and ducks, but their misbehavior is unmistakably human.... [Athos in America] is... consummately worth reading for its three gems: the lovely title story, the self-portrait 'A Cat From Heaven' and the wonderful 'Tom Waits on the Moon,' in which Jason carefully maps the crossed paths of four lonely people." – Sam Thielman, Newsday

Review: "Despair threatens to overwhelm the creator’s usual tales of longing [in Athos in America]. In 'A Cat From Heaven,' his characteristic unrequited love story gives way to a somewhat depressing look at a self-absorbed cartoonist named Jason’s bitter relationship. Mercifully, the rest of the collection is a little more playful, from a couple noir parodies to the highlight, 'Tom Waits on the Moon,' in which four solipsistic stories converge in a tragic act." – Mike Sebastian, Campus Circle

The Sincerest Form of Parody: The Best 1950s MAD-Inspired Satirical Comics

Review: "The Sincerest Form of Parody: The Best 1950s MAD-Inspired Satirical Comics is a wonderful book collecting the best stories of the beginnings of a favorite comic book genre — and I can’t emphasize this enough — it’s put together by people who know what they’re doing. Plus, it’s designed to fit on your bookshelf right next to your MAD Archives volumes. I can’t believe that you haven’t already picked this up! Are you unsane?!?" – K.C. Carlson, Comics Worth Reading

Wandering Son Vol. 2

Review: "If [Wandering Son] Vol. 1 was a masterclass in people not wanting to accept the status quo within their own minds, Vol. 2 shows the uncertainty of the waiting world. The way that Nitori and Takatsuki fumble forward with no plan is painful and endearing. They know the two of them are better together but there’s the problem of dealing with classmates, family and teachers. It’s not easy and well done to Takako for not short-circuiting the process. It’s not easy writing characters in distress but it’s wonderful to read it. If you can recognise the character’s pain and sympathise despite your differences, it proves you’re human and so is the author.... So much of what we read is a kind of literary false economy. We put in so much and get so little out of it. Wandering Son asks so little of you and you get so much out of it.... It is a wonderful, sweet, heartbreaking window into being different, young, unsure, afraid and human." – Eeeper's Choice

The Man Who Grew His Beard

Review: "[The Man Who Grew His Beard]’s a big batch of critic-friendly comic strips, comics which resemble curios excavated from some none-too-defined European past and more often than not have all the daring shallow-space visual syntax of a Garfield strip. They’re less stories than contraptions that wear their artifice and structure on their sleeve, like those medieval homunculi which transparently show their cogs and mechanisms while making their programmed movements." – Rich Baez, It's Like When a Cowboy Becomes a Butterfly

Action! Mystery! Thrills! Comic Book Covers of the Golden Age 1933-1945

Review: "Action! Mystery! Thrills!... beautifully resurrects all the Golden Age favorites, from superheroes to killer robots to cowboys and occult Nazis. This time capsule collection of cover art spans from 1933-45... An index in the back gives the fascinating stories behind the covers, while the full-page, color reproductions reveal them for what they are: works of art." – Mike Sebastian, Campus Circle

http://www.fantagraphics.com/images/flog/covers/2011/thumbs/bookcover_nutsgw.jpg

Review: "Primarily known for his ghoulish comic strips in Playboy and The New Yorker, Gahan Wilson showed his tender side (kind of) with Nuts. Originally a series of one-page vignettes running in National Lampoon, Nuts is presented here in its entirety as a classic warts-and-all reminiscence of childhood, from sick days to family gatherings, the joys of candy to the terrors of the dark basement." – Mike Sebastian, Campus Circle

The Life and Death of Fritz the Cat

Review: "R. Crumb hit it big in the ‘60s alternative Comix scene with his creation of Fritz the Cat (originally conceived as an adolescent). The feline protagonist remained Crumb’s avatar for lambasting American culture until a lackluster film adaptation prompted some divine retribution from his creator. The Life and Death of Fritz the Cat collects all of Fritz’s essential stories." – Mike Sebastian, Campus Circle

Jaime Hernandez - self portrait

Analysis: The Hooded Utilitarian's critical roundtable on Jaime Hernandez rolls on with entries from Derik Badman; the author of our forthcoming Love and Rockets Companion, Marc Sobel; and (Mome 22 contributor) James Romberger

Significant Objects

Awards: GalleyCat reports that Author Kathryn Kuitenbrouwer, contributor to Significant Objects, has won the $1,000 Sidney Prize, which rewards "the author of the best new American story," and has a link to an excerpt from the winning story

R Crumb at Comic Con India

Opinions: Robert Crumb's got 'em! In the third installment of the "Crumb On Others" series, he lets you know exactly what he thinks of a bunch of prominent personalities, from Hitler to Ghandi (in whose homeland Crumb can be seen above) and from Kurtzman to Van Gogh

Bill Griffith: Lost and Found - Comics 1969-2003

Interview: When The Comics Journal posted the Q&A with Bill Griffith conducted by Gary Panter, I called it the must-read of the day, and it still stands as your must-read of the week: "I’ve only taken LSD twice in my life. Once on the beach in Martha’s Vineyard in 1967, which was pleasant, but not ego-shattering or anything. And once in New York after I’d started doing comics. All I remember about the second time was, I got hemorrhoids."

Kolor Klimax: Nordic Comics Now

Interview: Who better to talk to Matthias Wivel, editor of our Scandinavian comics anthology Kolor Klimax, than Steffen Maarup, editor of our Danish comics anthology From Wonderland with Love? A taste: "Putting together a good anthology is similar to making a good mixtape. Whatever the individual merits of a piece, it won’t do to include it if it doesn’t somehow work for the anthology as a whole. There has to be a consistent idea or tone to the book, which doesn’t mean that there can’t be dissonance — there’s some of that in Kolor Klimax, and I think for the better — but the individual parts still have to generate something greater than their sum. It’s incredibly difficult to achieve, but also a lot of fun." Read more at The Metabunker

Amazing Mysteries: The Bill Everett Archives Vol. 1

Interview (Audio): Blake Bell joins host Chris Marshall on the Collected Comics Library Podcast for a discussion about Bill Everett and Steve Ditko


FLOG! Blog

Latest Entries

Archive

Tag Cloud
2020 Club, 21, Abstract Comics, adam grano, Adventures in Slumberland, Aidan Koch, AJ Fosik, Al Columbia, Al Feldstein, Al Floogleman, Al Jaffee, Al Williamson, Alex Chun, Alex Toth, Alexander Theroux, Aline Kominsky-Crumb, Amazing Heroes, An Age of License, Anders Nilsen, Andrei Molotiu, Andrice Arp, animation, arbitrary cuteness, Archer Prewitt, Arf, Ariel Bordeaux, Arnold Roth, art, Art Chantry, Art Clokey, art shows, artists, audio, awards, B Krigstein, Barnaby, Barry Windsor-Smith, Basil Wolverton, Beasts, behind the scene, Ben Catmull, Ben Jones, Ben Schwartz, best american comics criticism, Best of 2009, Best of 2010, Best of 2011, Best of 2012, Bill Everett, Bill Griffith, Bill Mauldin, Bill Schelly, Bill Ward, Bill Wenzel, Bill Willingham, Blab, Blake Bell, Blazing Combat, Bob Fingerman, Bob Levin, Bob Staake, Boody Rogers, Brian Kane, Brian Ralph, Bumbershoot, Burne Hogarth, Camille Rose Garcia, Captain Easy, Carl Barks, Carl Richter, Carol Swain, Carol Tyler, Catalog No 439, Cathy Malkasian, CCI, Charles Burns, Charles Forsman, Charles M Schulz, Charles Rodrigues, Charles Schneider, Chip Kidd, Chris Ware, Chris Wright, Chuck Forsman, classics, Colleen Coover, comic strips, comics industry, comics journal, Coming Attractions, comiXology, Conor OKeefe, Conor Stechschulte, contests, Crag Hill, Craig Yoe, Critters, Crockett Johnson, Daily OCD, Dame Darcy, Dan DeCarlo, Dan Nadel, Daniel Clowes, Danny Bland, Dash Shaw, Dave Cooper, Dave McKean, David B, David Collier, David Greenberger, David Lasky, David Levine, david sandlin, David Wojnarowicz, Debbie Drechsler, Denis The Menace, Dennis the Menace, Derek Van Gieson, Design, Destroy All Movies, Diaflogue, Diamond, Diane Noomin, Dick Briefer, digital comics, Disney, DJ Bryant, Don Flowers, Don Rosa, Down with OPP, Drawing Power, Drew Friedman, Drew Weing, Drinky Crow Show, Ebay, EC Comics, EC Segar, Ed Luce, Ed Piskor, Editors Notes, Edward Gorey, Eisner, Eldon Dedini, Eleanor Davis, Ellen Forney, Emile Bravo, Eric Reynolds, Ernie Bushmiller, Eros Comix, Eroyn Franklin, errata, Esther Pearl Watson, Eve Gilbert, events, fan art, Fantagraphics Bookstore, Fantagraphics history, fashion, FBI MINIs, FCBD, Femke Hiemstra, Field Trip, Flannery OConnor, Fletcher Hanks, flogcast, Floyd Gottfredson, Four Color Fear, Francesca Ghermandi, Francisco Solano López, Frank Santoro, Frank Stack, Frank Thorne, Freddy Milton, Fredrik Stromberg, Fredrik Strömberg, From Wonderland with Love, Fucking Nice Guy, Gabriella Giandelli, Gabrielle Bell, Gahan Wilson, Gary Groth, Gary Panter, Gast, Gene Deitch, George Carlson, George Chieffet, George Evans, George Herriman, Gil Kane, Gilbert Hernandez, Gilbert Shelton, Gipi, Glenn Bray, Glenn Head, God and Science, good deeds, Graham Chaffee, Graham Ingels, Greg Irons, Greg Sadowski, Guy Peellaert, Hal Foster, Hank Ketcham, Hans Rickheit, Harvey Kurtzman, Harvey Pekar, heiko mueller, Hergé, Hernán Migoya, Ho Che Anderson, hooray for Hollywood, Hotwire, Humbug, Humorama, Ignatz Series, Igort, In-joke Central, Inio Asano, Inspiration, interns, interview, interviews, Irwin Chusid, Ivan Brun, Ivan Brunetti, J Otto, Jack Cole, Jack Davis, Jack Jackson, Jack Kamen, Jack Kirby, Jacques Boyreau, Jacques Tardi, Jaime Hernandez, James Romberger, James Sturm, Janet Hamlin, Jason, Jason T Miles, Jean Schulz, Jeff Smith, jefferson machamer, jeffrey brown, Jeremy Eaton, Jeremy Tinder, Jerry Dumas, Jesse Moynihan, Jesse Reklaw, Jessica Abel, Jim Blanchard, Jim Flora, Jim Rugg, Jim Woodring, JIS, Joe Coleman, Joe Daly, Joe Kimball, Joe Kubert, Joe Orlando, Joe Sacco, Joe Simon, John Benson, John Cuneo, John Hankiewicz, john kerschbaum, John Liney, John Pham, John Severin, Johnny Craig, Johnny Gruelle, Johnny Ryan, Jon Adams, jon vermilyea, Jonathan Barli, Jonathan Bennett, Joost Swarte, Jordan Crane, Joseph Lambert, Josh Cochran, Josh Simmons, Joshua Glenn, Joyce Farmer, JR Williams, Jules Feiffer, Julia Gfrörer, Justin Green, Justin Hall, Kaz, Ken Parille, Kevin Avery, Kevin Huizenga, kevin scalzo, Kickstarter, Killoffer, Kim Deitch, Kim Thompson, Kipp Friedman, Kovey Korner, Krazy Kat, Kremos, Kristy Valenti, Kurt Wolfgang, Lane Milburn, Last Vispo, Laura Park, LB Cole, Leah Hayes, Leila Marzocchi, Leslie Stein, Lewis Trondheim, library, life imitates comics, Lilli Carré, Linda Medley, Liz Suburbia, Lizz Hickey, Lorenzo Mattotti, Lorna Miller, Los Bros Hernandez, Lou Reed, Love and Rockets, Lucy Knisley, Lyonel Feininger, Maakies, Mack White, Malachi Ward, Malcolm McNeill, manga, marc bell, Marc Sobel, Marco Corona, Marguerite Van Cook, Mario Hernandez, Mark Bode, Mark Fertig, Mark Kalesniko, Mark Martin, Mark Newgarden, Mark Todd, Marschall Books, Marti, Martin Cendreda, Martin Kellerman, mary fleener, Matt Broersma, Matt Danner, Matt Thorn, Matthias Lehmann, Matthias Wivel, maurice fucking sendak, Maurice Tillieux, Max, Max Andersson, McSweeneys, Meg Hunt, Megahex, Megan Kelso, merch, meta, Mia Wolff, Michael Chabon, Michael Dowers, Michael J Vassallo, Michael Kupperman, Michel Gagne, Mickey Mouse, Milt Gross, Mineshaft, misc, miscellany, Miss Lasko-Gross, Mister Wonderful, MK Brown, Molly Kiely, Mome, Monte Schulz, Mort Meskin, Mort Walker, Moto Hagio, Nancy, Nate Neal, Neil Gaiman, Nell Brinkley, New Comics Day, new releases, Newave, Nick Drnaso, Nick Thorburn, Nico Vassilakis, nicolas mahler, Nijigahara Holograph, No Straight Lines, Noah Van Sciver, Norman Pettingill, OCD, office fun, Oil and Water, Olivier Schrauwen, Original Art, Pat Moriarity, Pat Thomas, Patrick Rosenkranz, Paul Hornschemeier, Paul Karasik, Paul Nelson, Peanuts, Peter Bagge, Peter Kuper, Pirus and Mezzo, Playboy, podcast, Popeye, Portable Grindhouse, press, previews, Prince Valiant, production, queer, R Kikuo Johnson, Rand Holmes, Ray Fenwick, Raymond Macherot, RC Harvey, Rebel Visions, Renee French, reviews, Rich Tommaso, Richard Sala, Rick Altergott, Rick Griffin, Rick Marschall, RIP MD, rip-offs, Rob Walker, Robert Crumb, robert fiore, Robert Goodin, Robert Pollard, Robert Williams, Roberta Gregory, rock, Roger Langridge, Ron Regé Jr, Rory Hayes, Rosebud Archives, Roy Crane, Russ Heath, S Clay Wilson, sales specials, Sammy Harkham, Samuel R Delany, Sara Edward-Corbett, Sequential, Sergio Ponchione, Seth, Shag, Shannon Wheeler, shelf porn, Shilling, Shimura Takako, Short Run, signed bookplates, Significant Objects, Simon Deitch, Simon Hanselmann, slimy marketing, Some Douchebag, Sophie Crumb, Souther Salazar, spain, Spain Rodriguez, staff, Stan Sakai, Stephane Blanquet, Stephen DeStefano, Stephen Dixon, Stephen Weissman, Steve Brodner, Steve Ditko, Steve Duin, Steven Brower, Steven Weissman, Storm P, Supermen, T Edward Bak, Taking Punk to the Masses, tales designed to thrizzle, tattoos, Ted Jouflas, Ted Stearn, television, Terry Zwigoff, The Comics Journal, The Go-Gos, The Love Bunglers, The Stranger, Things to see, Thomas Ott, Tim Hensley, Tim Kreider, Tim Lane, TMNT, Tom Kaczynski, Tommi Musturi, Tony Millionaire, Tori Miki, toys, Trina Robbins, TS Sullivant, Tyler Stout, Ulli Lust, Umpteen Millionaire Club, Under the Covers, UNLOVABLE, Usagi Yojimbo, Vaughn Bode, Victor Kerlow, Victor Moscoso, video, Virgil Partch, VIVA LA COMIX, Wallace Wood, wallpapers, Wally Wood, walt holcombe, Walt Kelly, Wandering Son, Warren Bernard, webcomics, Wendy Chin, Wilfred Santiago, Will Elder, Willard Mullin, William S Burroughs, Willie and Joe, witzend, Wuvable Oaf, Zak Sally, Zap, Zippy the Pinhead

Upcoming Events

Sorry, no events to display
more events...

Flickr Feed

Our Bookstore

The Fantagraphics Bookstore & Gallery is located at 1201 S. Vale St., Seattle WA 98108. Tel: 206-658-0110.

Get all the latest store updates on Flog! The Fantagraphics Blog and on Facebook!

FBI•MINIs

FBI•MINIs

FREE exclusive FBI•MINI comics with qualifying mail-order purchases! (More details here.)

Related Sites

Visit our sister sites (links open in a new window):

Free Membership Benefits

Register and Login to receive full member benefits, including members-only special offers, commenting privileges on Flog! The Fantagraphics Blog, newsletters and special announcements via email, and stuff we haven't even thought of yet. Membership is free and spam-free, so Sign Up Today!

RSS Feeds

FLOG! Blog
New Releases
Fanta Events
more feeds...