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The Complete Peanuts 1953-1954 (Vol. 2) [Softcover Ed.]
The Complete Peanuts 1953-1954 (Vol. 2) [Softcover Ed.]
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The Complete Peanuts 1950-1954 (Vols. 1 - 2) Gift Box Set Softcover Ed.]
The Complete Peanuts 1950-1954 (Vols. 1 - 2) Gift Box Set Softcover Ed.]
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Walt Disney's Uncle Scrooge: The Seven Cities of Gold (The Complete Carl Barks Disney Library Vol. 14) [U.S./CANADA ONLY]
Walt Disney's Uncle Scrooge: The Seven Cities of Gold (The Complete Carl Barks Disney Library Vol. 14) [U.S./CANADA ONLY]
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Bumf Vol. 1: I Buggered the Kaiser
Bumf Vol. 1: I Buggered the Kaiser
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Category >> Bob Fingerman

Things to see: 6/8/10
Written by Mike Baehr | Filed under videoUsagi YojimboTony MillionaireThings to seeSteven WeissmanSteve BrodnerStan SakaiSergio PonchioneRenee FrenchRay FenwickPaul HornschemeierMichael KuppermanMark KalesnikoLilli CarréLaura ParkKevin HuizengaJosh Simmonsjohn kerschbaumJim WoodringJim FloraHans RickheitGilbert HernandezfashionDerek Van GiesonDebbie DrechslerDame DarcyBob FingermanAnders Nilsen 8 Jun 2010 5:12 PM

Clips & strips from the last few days — click for improved/additional viewing at the sources:

Why Not a Spider Monkey Jesus? - cover by Michael Kupperman

Michael Kupperman's cover art for the book Why Not a Spider Monkey Jesus? by A.G. Pasquella

Gilbert Hernandez fanzine art

Gilbert Hernandez fanzine art from 1981 as unearthed by Frank Santoro at Comics Comics

Usagi Yojimbo - Stan Sakai

ComicsAlliance presents selections from the 1991 Amazing Heroes Swimsuit Special

Frank, Fran and the skullfruit - Jim Woodring

• From Jim Woodring, Frank, Fran and the skullfruit

Amazing Facts and Beyond with Leon Beyond - Kevin Huizenga

• Leon explores the mystery of Poffo's Hat in this Amazing Facts and Beyond with Leon Beyond by Kevin Huizenga

Skinny-Man - Bob Fingerman

• Another 1975 flashback from Bob Fingerman

I, Anonymous - Steven Weissman

Post-It - Steven Weissman

• This week's "I, Anonymous" and one two three four Post-It Show previews from Steven Weissman

Dame Darcy

• New artwork for sale, Portugal tour diary and more in Dame Darcy 's latest blog update

Fishing in New Orleans - Jim Flora

• On the Jim Flora Art Blog, a circa 1940 woodcut depicting fishing in New Orleans (guess those days are over, thanks BP) and a commemoration of Pete Jolly's birthday

Ground Squirrel - Debbie Drechsler

• Recent nature sketches by Debbie Drechsler: Narrowleaf onion, ground squirrels, a blue-bellied lizard, and Ithuriel's spear

print - Lilli Carré

Four new screenprints by Lilli Carré — these and other products of her residency at Spudnik Press will be on display this Thursday, June 10, 2010, 6-7:30pm: more info here

sketch - Mark Kalesniko

Several recent sketches by Mark Kalesniko

Cartoon Boy - John Kerschbaum

• It's your all-new weekly installment of "Cartoon Boy" from John Kerschbaum

Maakies - Tony Millionaire

• I believe this is last week's Maakies by Tony Millionaire

il tUBUro - Sergio Ponchione

Sergio Ponchione contributed this illustrated recipe to an anarchist cookbook, it seems (and also drew Linda Lovelace)

Let's Make Lentil Salad!

• Speaking of illustrated recipes, here's one from Laura Park

 

Outdoors Is Bullshit - Paul Hornschemeier

• It's Paul Hornschemeier's new weekly t-shirt design for his Forlorn Funnies Shirt Shop — another classic

Green Lantern bunny - Josh Simmons

• From Josh Simmons & co., the latest Quackers & Randy Gander hijinks 

can't clap - Renee French

• From Renee French, this thing, this guy, this thing, this photo, this thing, and this guy

 

Steve Brodner takes on the Gulf oil disaster in this segment from PBS's Need to Know, with commentary and two more disaster-related sketches on his blog

installation - Anders Nilsen

Anders Nilsen posts photos of his recent "button installation" for Ogilvy & Mather's lobby, along with time-lapse video of its creation

Ectopiary page 27 - Hans Rickheit

Page 27 of Hans Rickheit's Ectopiary

The Cycle of Love - Derek Van Gieson

Derek Van Gieson presents "The Cycle of Love"

Soap - Ray Fenwick

• From Ray Fenwick, a comics illustration for an article in the Globe and Mail

Things to see: 5/28/10
Written by Mike Baehr | Filed under Things to seeSteven WeissmanSteve BrodnerPeanutsNoah Van SciverDebbie DrechslerDash ShawCharles M SchulzBob Fingerman 28 May 2010 2:32 PM

Daily clips & strips -- click for improved/additional viewing at the sources:

Snoopy

• A Snoopy sketch accompanied by a great Sparky anecdote from Greg Hoffman (via The Comics Reporter via Bob Levin)

Hamburger Boy - Bob Fingerman

• More of Bob Fingerman's kid stuff

storyboards - Dash Shaw

Dash Shaw's storyboards for (presumably) a scene from The Ruined Cast

20 dollars - Steven Weissman

• Hey, there's another Post-it Show coming up at GRNY next month, and here's one from Steven Weissman

sketchbook - Steven Weissman

• Also from Steven, more sketchbook

birds - Debbie Drechsler

• I'm partial to Debbie Drechsler's birds

page - Noah Van Sciver

Noah Van Sciver keeps working on his book

beyond pathetic - Steve Brodner

Steve Brodner's take on Sen. James Inhofe (R, Okla.)

Things to see: 5/26/10
Written by Mike Baehr | Filed under Things to seeT Edward BakSteven WeissmanJon AdamsJohn HankiewiczDebbie DrechslerBob Fingerman 26 May 2010 5:02 PM

Daily clips & strips -- click for improved/additional viewing at the sources:

Super Cat - Bob Fingerman

• More juvenilia from Bob Fingerman

Face - John Hankiewicz

• Another lithograph by John Hankiewicz

nuthatch fledgling - Debbie Drechsler

• Nice fledgling bird sketches by Debbie Drechsler

Stinckers at Big Brain

Stinckers by Steven Weissman & co. are now available at Big Brain Comics in Minneapolis

Truth Serum - Jon Adams

• This week's Truth Serum by Jon Adams

Steller Sea Lion - T. Edward Bak

T. Edward Bak's Steller Sea Lion linocut/letterpress print (part of his research expedition fundraising effort)

Things to see: 5/25/10
Written by Mike Baehr | Filed under Things to seeSteve BrodnerRenee FrenchJohnny Ryanjohn kerschbaumJim WoodringJim FloraHans RickheitGabrielle BellDerek Van GiesonBob Fingerman 25 May 2010 5:45 PM

Daily clips & strips -- click for improved/additional viewing at the sources:

Frank and the Faithful - Jim Woodring

• From Jim Woodring, a bounty of new Frank sketches (including one with his new female counterpart Fran) here, here and here

unnamables - Johnny Ryan

Johnny Ryan's "unnamables" — UPDATE: Details on the piece (it's for a Lovecraft-themed art show) at Johnny's blog

Gerry's Comix - Bob Fingerman

Bob Fingerman presents comics he did when he was 10 years old, starring Gerald Ford

Charlie Yup and His Snip-Snap Boys - Jim Flora

Jim Flora's endpapers for his 1959 children's book Charlie Yup and His Snip-Snap Boys

Lucky - Gabrielle Bell

Gabrielle Bell's new Lucky strip kind of reminds me of an episode of The IT Crowd I just watched

prune slug - Renee French

• The filename identifies this Renee French piece as "prune slug"

Your Mullah's Calling You - Steve Brodner

Steve Brodner takes on the triple threat of Rand Paul, Helen Ukpabio and Lost

Cartoon Boy - John Kerschbaum

• It's your all-new weekly installment of "Cartoon Boy" from John Kerschbaum

Ectopiary page 25 - Hans Rickheit

Page 25 of Hans Rickheit's Ectopiary

Abstraction House - Derek Van Gieson

• From Derek Van Gieson, more "Abstraction House," another "Devil Doll" teaser, and a preview of an upcoming strip debuting right here on the Fantagraphics website soon

Daily OCD: 5/24/10
Written by Mike Baehr | Filed under reviewsPrince ValiantHal FosterDaily OCDBob Fingerman 24 May 2010 5:33 PM

Online Commentary & Diversions:

Prince  Valiant Vol. 2: 1939-1940 [Pre-Order]

Review: "In following Prince Valiant through the third and fourth year of his four-color adventures, it is fascinating to watch Hal Foster shape his hero's personality and his reader's expectations. ... These lessons in how a prince and an adventure strip should conduct themselves are gloriously drawn and gloriously packaged. And to think: Fantagraphics will treat us to 30 more years of the same." – Steve Duin, The Oregonian

Interview: Marco on the Bass talks to Bob Fingerman about his illustration work for The Toasters and other ska bands

Daily OCD: 3/25/10
Written by Mike Baehr | Filed under Tim HensleySergio PonchioneJim WoodringHo Che AndersonFour Color FearDaniel ClowesDaily OCDBob Fingermanaudio 25 Mar 2010 4:49 PM

Online Commentary & Diversions:

Ghost World [Softcover Edition]

Review: "Ghost World feels like a really apt bit of social history to me now, rather than a piercing look at real life.  I believe it, but I believe it happened, not that it happens, at least not quite this way, at the age shown here. But, what is timeless is the theme that crops up towards the end: the unsettling feeling one gets when contemplating the lurch into adulthood." – Christopher King, Timmy's House of Sprinkles

Wally Gropius

Plugs: The bloggers at Comics And... Other Imaginary Tales comment on our offerings in the current issue of Previews, including Four Color Fear ("This will be awesome!"), Grotesque #4 ("This is a great story with great art and well worth the money"), and Wally Gropius ("The dichotomy between the clean and wholesome lines and the dirtyness of the story is what's pulling me in.")

Jim Woodring - photo: Christina Whiting, Homer News

Profile: Christina Whiting of the Homer News reports on Jim Woodring's current residency at the Bunnell Street Arts Center: "The Bunnell gallery space has been transformed into an exhibition of Woodring's art and into a working studio. His work table is covered with pads of paper, bottles of ink, quill pens and unfinished drawings — basic tools of his trade. ... Throughout the month, Woodring also has been working on a 100-page graphic novel, which he plans to publish. The first 20 pages are currently displayed in the gallery exhibit area, and he is adding a new page to the wall every couple of days. 'I'll likely create ten new pages while I'm here,' Woodring said."

Sand & Fury: A Scream Queen Adventure

Interview: At The Comics Journal, Alex Dueben talks to Ho Che Anderson about his new book Sand & Fury: "I’ve always been highly, highly influenced by movies, as much if not more so than comics. There were certainly comic book influences on S&F, like Richard Sala’s work and also Richard Corben whom I’m a big fan of, and even a little Jason Lutes though it’d be difficult to see. But it’s true that the majority of the influences were cinematic, particularly Dario Argento and David Lynch."

Marc Maron & Bob Fingerman

Interview: Bob Fingerman (right) & comedian Marc Maron (left) chat it up on Marc's WTF podcast

Things to see: 2/15/10
Written by Mike Baehr | Filed under Trina RobbinsTony MillionaireThings to seeT Edward BakSteve BrodnerSara Edward-CorbettRoger LangridgeMaakiesLewis TrondheimKurt WolfgangKevin HuizengaJohn PhamJim FloraHans RickheitGary PanterGahan WilsonFrom Wonderland with LoveFrank SantoroDerek Van GiesonBob FingermanAnders Nilsen 15 Feb 2010 4:44 PM

Let's start out with a little showin' off!

Yoda sketchbook vol. 3 page 6 - Gahan Wilson

• Mr. Gahan Wilson was kind enough to contribute this astonishing page to my Yoda theme sketchbook. (Mr. Wilson having been one of my favorite cartoonists since I was about 8 — 3 decades — this was an unparalleled thrill.) I just scanned and uploaded about 50 previously unseen Yodas — of particular interest to Fantagraphics fans may be (chronologically) T. Edward Bak, Bob Fingerman, Derek Van Gieson, Kurt Wolfgang, From Wonderland with Love contributors Christoffer Zieler & T. Thorhauge, Sara Edward-Corbett, Gary Panter, Trina Robbins, Lewis Trondheim, Roger Langridge, Frank Santoro, R. Sikoryak, and Anders Nilsen... and that ain't even the half of it!

Gahan Wilson - Sunday Comics

• Speaking of Gahan, Golden Age Comic Book Stories presents a selection of his mid-1970s newspaper feature Gahan Wilson Sunday Comics

Amazing Facts and Beyond with Leon Beyond - Kevin Huizenga

• The latest Amazing Facts and Beyond with Leon Beyond by Kevin Huizenga

WK Remix - Kevin Huizenga

• Speaking of Kevin H., here's some manner of Wild Kingdom "remix"

flower - Jim Flora

A happy flower (1943) and an odd creature (1993, not shown here) by Jim Flora

John Pham artwork

John Pham is readying some artwork for an upcoming solo show at GR2 (stay tuned for an announcement — image yoinked from Facebook)

Drinky Crow tree rings

Drinky Crow, by Mother Nature (ganked from Tony Millionaire's Facebook) — somebody call the Vatican

from Ectopiary page 11 - Hans Rickheit

Hans Rickheit's Ectopiary, page 11 , plus layouts for the cover of The Comics Interpreter #1

for The Nation - Steve Brodner

• For The Nation, Steve Brodner on that shitty recent Supreme Court decision

Daily OCD: 2/15/10
Written by Mike Baehr | Filed under The Comics JournalreviewsJohn PhamGilbert HernandezFantagraphics BookstoreeventsDrew FriedmanDaily OCDCraig Yoecomics industryBob Fingerman 15 Feb 2010 4:39 PM

Presidents Day does not stop the Online Commentary & Diversions:

Review: "In Hernandez’s hands, [The Troublemakers] unspools on the page like a Russ Meyer production, from the in-your-face nudity, right down to the cartoony violence played for laughs. ...[I]t sure is fun." — Rod Lott, Bookgasm

Review: "Even if I finally accepted that [Sublife Vol. 2] did not answer any of my questions from the first volume... I still admired the growth in Pham’s work on display between the two volumes. Volume 2 shows a terrific range, beginning a Clowes-like opening series of strips about a murderous blogger with an under-read blog that shows a biting wit not on display in the first volume. The tour de force of the volume is the second piece, which picks up (for those paying incredibly scrupulous attention) on a deep space adventure from the inside covers of Volume 1. Here Pham lets his instincts for architectural design sense take off in a trippy sequence that is pure pleasure to look at. ... In some ways — in many ways actually — the first two volumes of Sublife evoke memories of the early volumes of Acme Novelty Warehouse [sic]. And that could be a very good thing." – Jared Gardner, The Comics Journal

Review: "...I am delighted to report that The Great Anti-War Cartoons offers an impressive showcase of political cartooning. Many of its contributors have never had their work reprinted with as much care. Even the most well-informed reader will stumble across pieces they have never seen or names they have never heard of." – Kent Worcester, The Comics Journal

Review: "[There are] ...a number of strong stories to be found here [in Mome Vol. 17], and a number of rewards to be gained by those who were following serials like Paul Hornschemeier’s 'Life With Mr. Dangerous' or the second chapters of the stories done by Renee French and Ted Stearn." – Rob Clough, The Comics Journal

Plug: Robot 6's Chris Mautner describes his experience so far reading The Comics Journal Library Vol. 5: Classic Comics Illustrators

Interview: Newave! The Underground Mini Comix of the 1980s editor Michael Dowers talks to Robot 6's Tim O'Shea: "I want people to see that if you believe in something hard enough and never give up that you can get somewhere in life. Here is a group of creative types who couldn’t take no for an answer and made their own world of comics."

Interview: David-Wasting-Paper subjects Drew Friedman to a rigorous Q&A about process, influences and more

Feature: The Seattle Times talks to Fantagraphics Bookstore & Gallery curator and unofficial Georgetown spokesmodel Larry Reid about the emerging neighborhood

Industry: Our own Eric Reynolds weighs in on the annual book-trade-vs.-direct-market sales-analysis kerfuffle in an essay for The Comics Reporter

Events: The lineup for the Covered art show opening March 6 at Secret Headquarters was just announced and looks pretty great

Events: Bring some of your old Bob Fingerman comics down to Rocketship this Friday so he has something to sign besides his new TPB

Satire: Oh Spurge, you crack us up

Daily OCD: 12/9/09
Written by Mike Baehr | Filed under Trina RobbinsTony MillionaireTim LaneThomas OttTerry ZwigoffRoger LangridgeRichard SalareviewsPrince ValiantPopeyeNell BrinkleyMichael KuppermanKevin HuizengaJoe SaccoHal FosterGary PanterEC SegarDash ShawDaniel ClowesCharles M SchulzBob FingermanBest of 2009Al Columbia 9 Dec 2009 3:12 PM

Chock full o' Online Commentary & Diversions:

• List: The Village Voice 's R.C. Baker names 2009's Best Comics and Graphic Novels. Among the choices: "A lucid nightmare, Al Columbia's dazzlingly well-drawn Pim & Francie features vignettes of its young protagonists menaced by creepy relatives or starring in exceedingly grim fairy tales. These inky visions seem unearthed from the deepest vaults of Uncle Walt's id. ... Anything but Victorian, Nell Brinkley (1886–1944) celebrated the Roaring '20s with sinuous lines and colors as lurid as William Randolph Hearst's presses could muster. Author Trina Robbins notes, in the lavishly oversize The Brinkley Girls, that the illustrator 'closely resembled the girls she drew.' But Brinkley, with her thrilling fantasias of pirate abductions and aviatrix romances, remains an inspiration beyond flapper flamboyance to any young lady seeking to break into the boys' club of high-end illustration."

• List: Greek site Comicdom is halfway through counting down the top 100 comics of the '00s. On the list so far: Tales Designed to Thrizzle Vol. 1 by Michael Kupperman at #99 ("Following at a discreet distance from the legacy of Monty Python, Michael Kupperman should be considered a genius by any man who has laughed with the group of Britons"), Billy Hazelnuts by Tony Millionaire at #67 ("In the surrealist vein of Krazy Kat and the otherworldly, oneiric atmosphere of Little Nemo... misanthropy and almond sweetness"), Safe Area Gorazde by Joe Sacco at #60 ("The shock was, however, not an end in itself, since what actually manages to come across is the sense of pain and loss that each of the interviewees had experienced"), and Fred the Clown by Roger Langridge at #53 ("Ingenious comics by an equally intelligent designer who not only knows the history of the instrument and understand what makes it work"). [Quotes cobbled from autotranslation.]

• Review: "There have been a lot of great comic book releases this year, but none has the beauty and melancholy resonance of Fantagraphics' Prince Valiant: Volume 1-1937-1938. ... As for Hal Foster, Fantagraphics has given this artist his due and helped place him in his proper context as a great American artist and master of the comics form." – Mark Rhodes, Omnicomic

• Review: "Employing a storytelling dynamic not unlike that of Serling’s science fiction classic, Thomas Ott’s The Number 73304-23-4153-6-96-8 is itself a visit... to a dimension not of sound, but of sight and mind that at once both rewards and confuses. ... Ott’s hyper-meticulous attention to how detail relates to used space and negative space is at once both unsettling and captivating, utilizing a form of technical, pen-like cross-hatching for essentially every line that can only be described as Robert Crumb on Adderall. ... The Number is a universally literate work of fiction that is a quick first read with potential for longer lasting examination." – C.R. Stemple, Pads & Panels

• Review: "The Unclothed Man in the 35th Century A.D. is a fascinating first animated work [third, actually — ed.] from one of today's most original and unusual artists. Shaw adapts well from the comics page to the cinematic form. ... Almost as well as his comics, this film expresses Shaw's ongoing desire to look at the world from a slightly askew perspective, to express his fascination with the complexity of people's inner universes. ...[T]he film... [is] a probing, emotional examination of what it means to make art and to forge meaningful human interactions..." – Ed Howard, Only the Cinema

• Plugs: More Segar birthday/Popeye Google fallout: Mark Evanier

• Plug: In an interview with IFC found by our own Janice Headley, musician Chuck Prophet names Ghost World as a favorite movie: "A coming-of-age teen flick movie that pivots around Skip James’ 'Devil Got My Woman' can do no wrong with me. And shouldn’t with anyone else."

• Interview: At Comics Comics, Dan Nadel presents audio of the panel with Gary Panter & Peter Saul at the Brooklyn Comics & Graphics Festival last weekend

• Interview: New in the TCJ.com audio archives: Gary Groth's 1997 interview with Charles M. Schulz

• Things to see in the future: The Daily Cartoonist reports that the "Schulz’s Beethoven, Schroeder’s Muse" exhibit which ran at the Charles M. Schulz Museum & Research Center last year is moving to an online home a week from today — we'll try to bring you a link when it launches

• Things to see: A potpourri of Amazing Facts... and Beyond! with Leon Beyond by Kevin Huizenga (BTW we tend only to link to Kevin's AFAB...WLB strips since he's on our roster, but that's not to give short shrift to Dan Zettwoch, who routinely knocks these out of the park too)

• Things to see: An interesting oldie from Bob Fingerman

• Things to see: Progress on Tim Lane's Temptations cut-outs diorama

• Things to see: Richard Sala's "Psycho Santa Movies," in color! (from 2003)

Daily OCD: 11/10/09
Written by Mike Baehr | Filed under reviewsPrince ValiantJohnny RyanJim FloraHal FosterBob FingermanAl ColumbiaAbstract Comics 10 Nov 2009 3:56 PM

Online Commentary & Diversions:

• Review: "The different techniques — ink on paper, watercolor, pencil, black or color, collage, digital manipulation, minimalist drawing, patchwork, cartoony lines... — associated to the different strategies and presences of 'comics' elements in these variations will make us wonder, on the one hand, on a progressive dilution of any formal determination in relation to this art (bringing it closer, thus, to freer or more conceptual artistic disciplines, in which the gesture is more important than, say, talent, virtuosity, technical prowess), and, on the other hand, in the phantasmatical emergence of an unifying idea (a name: 'abstract comics'), but which is, in the last instance, irreducible to something directly analyzable." – Pedro Vieira de Moura, SuccoAcido

• Review: "I wish to add my voice to the chorus of those who really, really like Johnny Ryan's left-hand turn into violent fantasy with the promise of more to come, Prison Pit. ... Prison Pit should help anyone paying attention to appreciate how carefully Ryan designs and executes his work. You could not achieve the gruesome effects and consistent energy Ryan does here without being absolutely on top of that style... Ryan's general intelligence — I think he's one of the smartest cartoonists — is also on display in how quickly he picks up the rhythms of the kind of sprawling manga and art-comics fantasies that this book frequently recalls. ... Crucially, I never knew exactly where Ryan was headed but every scene in Prison Pit seemed to flow naturally from the previous one right up to the brutally funny, icky and appropriate ending. I hope there are ten more." – Tom Spurgeon, The Comics Reporter

• Review: "Unlike anything Ryan's done thematically, or really, unlike anything Fantagraphics has published before, Prison Pit is a non-stop action comic. It's pretty successful in that regard, with imaginative character designs and some surprising battles, full of many odd transformations and characters surviving the loss of limbs, even a head. And although the genre is different, Ryan can't seem to deviate from a fascinating mix of sex and violence and bodily fluids." – Christopher Allen, Comic Book Galaxy

• Plug: "[Pim & Francie] is an arrangement of drawings — sometimes preparations for drawings — generally honed in on the journey of two old-timey animation-looking kids. Sometimes there's dialogue, sometimes there's 'scenes,' but most of the work's interest comes from wrenching you though time and space as the narrative stretches just thin enough to part in spots, only to gum together again for a little while, until it's pulled again." – Joe McCulloch, Jog - The Blog

• Plug: "Hal Foster's Prince Valiant is probably my all time favorite comic strip, and this new collection consolidating the strips from 1937-1938 is very well produced." – San Antonio Board Gamers

• Reviewer: TCJ Assistant Editor Kristy Valenti puts on her freelancer cap once again and reviews Samuel R. Delaney & Mia Wolff's Bread & Wine for comiXology

• Events: The Daily Cross Hatch's Brian Heater reports from last weekend's King Con in Brooklyn, with audio from the Bob Fingerman Spotlight panel

• Things to see: Several vintage Jim Flora illustrations (including possibly some previously unpublished ones) ran in last Sunday's UK Telegraph Sunday jazz supplement — the Jim Flora Art blog has a link to a PDF