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Category >> Coming Attractions

Adventures in translation
Written by Kim Thompson | Filed under Joost SwarteComing Attractions 26 Apr 2011 8:31 AM

Between my own (ahem) vast accumulated knowledge and the marvels of the internet, it's rare that I find myself genuinely stumped by a line in a book I'm translating, but when I came across this particular panel in the Joost Swarte book Is That All There Is? that will (yes, it will!) be coming out later this year, I was mystified:

Joost Swarte panel - Dutch

Jopo de Pojo is trying to slip out of a movie theatre midshow, and while the latter two patrons' comments are are self-evident enough (an irate "hush!" and a complaint about Jopo's trademark quiff, mistaken for a hat), the first one baffled me, as it seemed to say "would you let out the goat?" or perhaps "are you going to let out the goat?"

As it happens, there exists an English language version of this story created by the Dutch publisher, which Joost himself once referred to as a "hippie translation" (meaning somewhat erratic). And yes, the hippie translator in question had rendered the line with strict literalness: "Are you going to walk your goat?" Which was of no help whatsoever.

Now, I did suspect it might be some Dutch expression I didn't know (Dutch is not my strongest language by a long shot), but a Google search yielded nothing but a series of (admittedly very cute) photos of goats.

As I was flailing around, I started wondering if this was an insulting reference to Jopo's trademark foot-tall quiff (earlier in the book someone else had referred to him as "that idiot with the shark-fin on his head")... but fortunately, like Woody Allen pulling out Marshall McLuhan in Annie Hall, I had access to the unimpeachable prime source and so I cut to the chase and just emailed Joost and asked him.

Turns out "letting out the goat" is Dutch slang for going to take a pee. Aha! (And Duh!)

Thus:

Joost Swarte panel - English

I always loved that phrase. One big satisfaction of working as a translator is being able to drop in some of your pet expressions.

I went back and checked the French version of this story, and it turns out that translator also literally translated it as "letting out the goat," which I'm pretty sure is not a French expression for urination, or anything else. So I was apparently neither the first nor the second to fall into that particular trap; I was just the first to confess my bafflement to the author. Sometimes confessing one's ignorance is the wisest thing one can do.

...Unless Joost is just fucking with me. (Or, as the English would say, taking the piss out of me.)

PS: Talk about burying the lede: Yes, four years after we announced it, Joost Swarte has finally delivered the files for this book, and all I can say is that given how wonderful this book is and how utterly meticulous his (and his assistants') work on reconstructing the pages (from a rat's nest of originals, negatives, photostats, etc.) has been, that now seems like an entirely reasonable wait. You will not be disappointed.



First Look: Willie & Joe: Back Home by Bill Mauldin
Written by Mike Baehr | Filed under Willie and JoeComing AttractionsBill Mauldin 22 Apr 2011 1:01 PM

Willie & Joe: Back Home by Bill Mauldin

The final cover art for our forthcoming second (or third, depending on how you count the initial 2-volume box set) volume of Bill Mauldin's Willie & Joe, fresh from Art Director Jacob Covey. It'll be a clothbound, unjacketed hardcover to match the hardcover edition of the previous collection Willie & Joe: The WWII Years, which is being reissued in a new single-volume softcover edition simultaneous with this new volume this July.

Daily OCD: 4/21/11
Written by Mike Baehr | Filed under Tony MillionairespainreviewsPeanutsMatt ThornmangaMaakiesJordan CraneJasonJacques TardiDaily OCDComing AttractionsCharles M Schulz 21 Apr 2011 5:49 PM

Today's Online Commentary & Diversions:

The Complete Peanuts 1979-1980 (Vol. 15)

Review: "Even though Peanuts's peak was sometime back in the sixties these books are still coming out and you know what? They're still good. I keep waiting for a sharp decline in quality to hit but I'm still enjoying seeing Snoopy blissfully living out his fantasies, Charlie Brown being unable to ever be happy, Lucy being a jerk, etc. [...] This book suddenly made me want to go back in time very, very hard. I want to live in Peanuts so bad. Fuck my life. Someone help get me out of this life." – Nick Gazin, Vice

Uptight #4 [January 2011]

Review: "Jordan Crane has a sweet skinny line and can draw like no one else. He can draw complicated scenes and it's clear that he never uses a ruler. There's something very friendly and reassuring about his drawing style. Jordan Crane is without a doubt one of the best guys in the alt comix game right now and my only criticism of him is that I wish he turned out more work. Jordan's making the comics that everyone else is trying to make but unlike them, he's succeeding at it." – Nick Gazin, Vice

Like a Sniper Lining Up His Shot  

Coming Attractions: Library Journal's Martha Cornog spotlights a couple of our August 2011 releases. First, Like a Sniper Lining Up His Shot by Jacques Tardi & Jean-Patrick Manchette: "The fantasy grime of Manchette's noir thrillers may not equal the true-life grime of World War I, but both make pretty darn gripping reading when Tardi gets through with them. It Was the War of the Trenches made numerous 2010 best-of lists, including those of Booklist and Library Journal. Manchette and Tardi's previous collaboration on West Coast Blues didn't do badly either, being nominated for two Eisners. With Sniper, a pro killer wants to nail one last job before retiring to marry his childhood sweetheart. But of course it's no cupcake gig." Second, Cruisin' with the Hound: The Life and Times of Fred Tooté by Spain Rodgriguez: "Here we have tales of the wild 1950s in muscular black and white, some memoir and some just tales, from take-no-prisoners Zap Comix veteran Rodriguez. [...] Expect this one to be adults-only: motorcycles, raunch, and rock 'n' roll and described as the unsentimental and hilarious 'anti-Happy Days.'"

Wandering Son: Book 1

Commentary: On his blog, our manga editor/translator Matt Thorn weighs in on the damaging legacy left behind by TokyoPop

Hey, Wait...

Analysis: "Hey, Wait... presents a varied collection of strategies which help express emptiness and lack of meaning; the metaphorical use of silences and visual minimalism are two of these, and will become frequent in the author’s repertory in the following books. Meaninglessness, though, can also be expressed by adopting an aesthetics of visual excess (since both lack and overload can be equally menacing to the production of meaning). In this specific page, this is done at a typographical level." – Greice Schneider, The Comics Grid

Little Maakies on the Prairie

Blood & Thunder: "Why do you continue to publish Maakies? Is it intended to disgust people?" – Kevin Rutkowski, in a Letter to the Editor of The Austin Chronicle

Things to See: Prison Pit 3 page peek
Written by Mike Baehr | Filed under Things to seeOriginal ArtJohnny RyanComing Attractions 20 Apr 2011 3:46 PM

Prison Pit - Chapter Seven: The Caligulon - Johnny Ryan

Via Ryan at Same Hat: "Our buddy Johnny Ryan is finishing up PRISON PIT 3 as we speak :)" He's right on schedule — it's due out in October.

Richard Sala updates on The Hidden
Written by Mike Baehr | Filed under Richard SalaOriginal ArtComing Attractions 18 Apr 2011 8:08 PM

Richard Sala - The Hidden original art

On his Here Lies Richard Sala blog, Richard Sala posted this drool-inducing photo of original pages for his forthcoming graphic novel The Hidden, along with an update on the status of the book, which is now complete and undergoing production. He also points out an eerie incidence of life imitating comics, which, if you know his work, is rather ominous.

First Look: Drawing Power: A Compendium of Cartoon Advertising
Written by Mike Baehr | Filed under Rick MarschallMarschall BooksComing Attractions 14 Apr 2011 12:46 PM

Drawing Power: A Compendium of Cartoon Advertising

Here's your first look at the final cover design for Drawing Power: A Compendium of Cartoon Advertising edited by Rick Marschall & Warren Bernard, which is heading to the printer soon for a July release date. The book represents a couple of firsts for us: it's the first release from our Marschall Books imprint, and it's the first design job under salary from the newest member of our Art Department, Tony Ong, formerly at Dark Horse. (As a freelancer, Tony designed the cover for the second printing of Four Color Fear.) That's Tony's beautiful hand-lettering, too.

Mome Vol. 22: The End
Written by Mike Baehr | Filed under Tim LaneT Edward BakSergio PonchionepreviewsNate NealMomeLaura ParkKurt WolfgangDerek Van GiesonComing Attractions 13 Apr 2011 11:44 AM

Mome pinup - Sergio Ponchione

The Comics Reporter broke the news that the next volume of Mome, number 22, will be the last. CR's Tom Spurgeon commented and spoke to Mome editor Eric Reynolds about ending the long-running anthology; Rob Clough talked to Eric at TCJ.com; and Sean T. Collins comments at Robot 6. We thank the three of them and everyone else who has been a proponent of the series. I for one will miss the publication and abhor the vacuum its departure will leave, but look forward to Eric's future editorial efforts and future work from Mome's long list of contributors.

Pictured above, a Mome pinup created for the issue by Sergio Ponchione; below, artwork from the final issue recently posted by the contributors: from Tim Lane's "Belly Gunner" (see additional pages at his Jackie No-Name blog); from Kurt Wolfgang's "Nothing Eve" (taken from the New Bodega blog); from Derek Van Gieson's "Devil Doll" (see more pages and read his comments on his history with Mome at his These Days I Remain blog); from Nate Neal's "Death" (taken from his Flickr feed); pages in progress from Laura Park (taken from her Flickr feed); and from T. Edward Bak's "Wild Man" (see more pages at his °Ø° blog).

Belly Gunner - Tim Lane

Nothing Eve - Kurt Wolfgang

Derek Van Gieson - Devil Doll

Death - Nate Neal

halfway there

• Also working away on a new Mome story: Laura Park

Wild Man - T. Edward Bak

Murder by High Tide Teaser
Written by Jason Miles | Filed under previewsMaurice TillieuxComing Attractions 31 Mar 2011 1:33 PM

As we've been working on M. Tillieux's Murder by High Tide I've become gripped by Tillieux's cartooning, especially his panel composition and pitch-perfect, push-pull blend of "naturalist" and "cartoony" figure work.  What follows are a series of panels from Catch as Catch Can (the second story featured in Murder by High Tide) that I've been particularly struck by. Note: these panels, in their finished form, will be colored and lettered.

M. Tillieux - from Murder by High Tide

This panel reminds me of Toth or Xaime, what with how the acting, lighting and composition leads the eye to read Gil Jordan's darkened face and arm as he slowly creeps the door open to… what???

M. Tillieux - from Murder by High Tide

That's Gil Jordan dashing into the shadows as he's hot on the heels of Joe The Syringe. This panel stopped me cold.

M. Tillieux - from Murder by High Tide

I love this panel. I half expect to see my reflection in the rearview mirror. I used to think panels like this didn't work… or that you had to be Xaime to make them work, but time and time again Tilleux subtly or overtly places the reader's sightline in such a way to immerse your eye into Gil Jordan's four color world.

M. Tillieux - from Murder by High Tide

What could've easily been a throwaway panel graciously offers Tillieux's masterful drawing as acting equals cartooning!

M. Tillieux - from Murder by High Tide

Bonus! Six panel action sequence from Catch as Catch Can. (Click to see bigger.)

Tillieux's best work stands tensely between Hergé's ligne claire and Franquin's reverent bounce. It's the hearing-the-ice-crack tension of Tillieux's ink that brings it for me as it flawlessly meets the gestalt of the mystery thriller genre.  And if that weren't enough, Tillieux, like American film director Howard Hawks, is a master of characterization and letting the scene play out. As a fan of the comfortable character interaction of Hawks' Rio Bravo and Hatari, I could spend all day hanging out with Gil Jordan and his assistant, Crackerjack!

Music Critic Paul Nelson Finally Gets His Due
Written by Jacq Cohen | Filed under Paul NelsonKevin AveryComing Attractions 31 Mar 2011 12:30 PM

Everything Is an Afterthought: The Life and Writings of Paul Nelson (not final cover)
(not final cover) 

Fantagraphics is proud to announce Everything Is an Afterthought: The Life and Writings of Paul Nelson. Author Kevin Avery spent four years researching and writing this unique anthology-biography. This book compiles Nelson's best works and also provides a vivid account of his life.

In the '60s, Paul Nelson pioneered rock & roll criticism with a first-person style of writing later coined "New Journalism." During a five-year detour at Mercury Records, he signed the New York Dolls to their first recording contract, and then settled back down to music criticism at Rolling Stone. Through his writing, Nelson championed the early careers of artists like Bruce Springsteen, Jackson Browne, Rod Stewart, Neil Young, Warren Zevon, The Sex Pistols, and The Ramones.

But in 1982, he walked away from it all. By the time Nelson died in his New York City apartment in 2006, everything he'd written had been relegated to back issues of old music magazines.

"My original idea for this book was simply to anthologize Paul Nelson's best work so that today's readers could discover, as I had in my youth, his elegant and brilliant writings," explains author Kevin Avery. "But I soon realized that, in doing these pieces, Paul was ultimately telling his own story. And his story was so damn compelling it was impossible for me not to write about it."

American journalist, biographer, and poet Nick Tosches wrote the foreword to this landmark work of cultural revival, which stands as a tribute to and collection of one of the unsung critical champions of popular music.

Everything Is an Afterthought: The Life and Writings of Paul Nelson
By: Kevin Avery • Foreword By: Nick Tosches
$29.99 • Hardcover • Black & White • 584 Pages
Release: November 2011
ISBN: 978-1606994757

(To download the press release in PDF format, see this story in our News section.)




Listen to the sounds of Listen, Whitey! on Hollow Earth Radio tonight
Written by Mike Baehr | Filed under Pat ThomasComing Attractionsaudio 30 Mar 2011 2:05 PM

Listen, Whitey! postcard

Pat Thomas, author of our Fall 2011 book Listen, Whitey! The Sounds of Black Power 1965-1975, will be on Hollow Earth Radio's Central Sounds program tonight at 10 PM Pacific to play and discuss various songs featured in the book. If that sounds interesting to you at all, you will not want to miss it. See how to tune in to the online stream here.