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Category >> Coming Attractions

Things to See: Another Jason preview page
Written by Mike Baehr | Filed under Things to seeJasonComing Attractions 8 Nov 2010 12:17 PM

http://www.fantagraphics.com/images/flog/mike/201011/07mort1t%5B1%5D.jpg

At his Cats Without Dogs blog Jason posts another page from the French edition of his forthcoming graphic novel Isle of 100,000 Graves (written by written by Fabien Vehlmann; coming in English from Fantagraphics in Spring 2011). See a previous glimpse here.

Daily OCD: 10/22-25/10
Written by Mike Baehr | Filed under Thomas OttreviewsNate NealMoto HagiomangaLyonel FeiningerLove and RocketsLewis TrondheimKevin HuizengaJasonJaime HernandezFour Color FearDestroy All MoviesDaily OCDComing AttractionsCathy MalkasianBlake BellBill Everett 25 Oct 2010 4:39 PM

Online Commentary & Diversions from Friday to today:

The Sanctuary

Review: "In The Sanctuary, Nate Neal traces back the history of manipulation, power battles and betrayal to a single cave, thousands of years ago. The story unfolds entirely in a Paleolithic language Neal created, rendering the action subtle as a tribe careens toward possible chaos amidst the battles contained. [...] In the dynamics that Neal presents, you can see your country, your town, your work place and your family, all rolled into one cautionary tale. In stark black and white, Neal’s art exhibits much sophistication, while still maintaining a required roughness, given the time period and level of civilization he’s portraying. [...] Neal’s book digs deep down to the core of our humanity that almost requires manipulation for movement, but suggests that sometimes there are victories for us even if we do require a shifty style of prodding." – John E. Mitchell, The North Adams Transcript

Review: "As ever, Jason's characters are universal precisely because they're so specific and odd; dog-faced werewolf Everymen, living their lives of quiet desperation. His art is precise and carefully defined, a collection of moments carefully chosen and arrayed to imply so much more than his characters could ever say. His silences are theatrical — he's the Beckett, or Pinter, of comics. And Werewolves of Montpellier is another masterly performance from one of our modern best." – Andrew Wheeler, The Antick Musings of G.B.H. Hornswoggler, Gent.

Love and Rockets: New Stories #3 [with FREE Signed Bookplate]

Reviews: Sean T. Collins continues "Love and Rocktober" at Attentiondeficitdisorderly, delving into Love and Rockets: New Stories with Jaime's "Ti-Girls Adventures" from #1-2 ("If 'Locas' has taught us anything, isn't it that women should be the stars and driving forces behind their own damn comic, even if they're dressing up in one-piece swimsuits and punching each other in the process?") and the "Browntown"/"The Love Bunglers" duology from #3 ("Such power! ...[One] of the most devastating — and I mean so sad it impacted me physically — comics I've ever read. I will never forget reading this book.")

A Drunken  Dream and Other Stories [Pre-Order]

Review: "...A Drunken Dream and Other Stories... sucked me into its stories and made me want to read a lot more of Hagio’s comics. A mixture of romance, science-fiction, and family drama, this ten story compilation is one of the strongest examples I’ve seen of the depth and breadth that the shôjo genre can contain. [...] Highly recommended." – Greg McElhatton, Read About Comics

Four Color Fear: Forgotten Horror Comics of the 1950s [Pre-Order]

Review: "Now [Four Color Fear: Forgotten Horror Comics of the 1950s] is my kind of Americana. A finely curated collection of pre-code horror comics from publishers whose initials are not E.C." – M. Ace, Irregular Orbit

Temperance

Review: "...[Temperance] is an intimidatingly rich work, full of symbolism and moody art... It's all lushly rendered in spooky gray tones, with lively, somewhat pudgy characters always striving forward toward their dubious goals... Malkasian clearly has poured her heart into this story, bringing the characters to life even as they act to make readers think beyond the story itself. It's a beautiful book, and one that will stick in the mind for some time after reading it." – Matthew J. Brady, Warren Peace Sings the Blues

Fire & Water: Bill Everett, the Sub-Mariner and the Birth of Marvel Comics [with FREE Signed Bookplate]

Review: "...[T]his fabulous tome highlights the astounding wizardry of one of the most accomplished draughtsmen and yarn-spinners of [comics'] incredibly fertile early period. [...] Evocatively written by biographer Blake Bell, with dozens of first hand accounts from family, friends and contemporaries; the sad, unjust life of this key figure of comics art is lovingly recounted here with hundreds of artistic examples... Fire and Water offers an opportunity to revel in the mastery of a truly unique pillar of America’s sequential Art establishment. [...] Brilliant, captivating, and utterly unmissable, this is the book Bill Everett deserves — and so do you." – Win Wiacek, Now Read This!

Destroy All Movies!!!: The Complete Guide to Punks on Film [Pre-Order]

Plug: "Wow, punk is now nostalgic. You can’t stop getting older, can you? Well, you can, but it’s not a good alternative. Anyway, Fantagraphics has announced that next month they will release Destroy All Movies!!! The Complete Guide to Punks on Film, over 400 pages of reference to 'every appearance of a punk (or new waver!) to hit the screen in the 20th Century.'" – Johanna Draper Carlson, DVDs Worth Watching

Ganges #1

Commentary: At Robot 6, Chris Mautner gives you a beginner's guide to Kevin Huizenga in the latest "Comics College" feature: "In the short time he’s been making comics, Huizenga has shown himself to be an author of considerable talent and probing sincerity."

Interview: Avoid the Future talks to Kevin Huizenga: "I often feel that I’m not really a true artist or a writer, just a fan whose playing make-believe. The inner compulsion I have is to put together something with a kind of complex structure, with some complex arrangement of things that surprises me, or makes me feel like my favorite comics do."

The Comic Strip Art of Lyonel Feininger

Commentary: At the Schulz Library Blog, read "Lyonel Feininger: Lost Expressionist Master of the Sunday Comics Page," a comics-history class essay by Andy Warner (CCS, Class of 2012)

http://www.fantagraphics.com/images/flog/mike/201005/thomasottrip_thumb.jpg

Coming Attractions: Library Journal's Martha Cornog spotlights R.I.P.: Best of 1985-2004 by Thomas Ott and Approximate Continuum Comics by Lewis Trondheim in their Graphic Novel Prepub Alert for January 2011 releases

Ray Fenwick previews Mascots
Written by Mike Baehr | Filed under Ray FenwickpreviewsComing Attractions 25 Oct 2010 1:01 PM

Mascots - Ray Fenwick

Ray Fenwick presents a selection of 13 pages from his forthcoming book Mascots (coming in December) at his newly-redesigned website. Ray's follow-up to the critically-acclaimed Hall of Best Knowledge is comprised of text and images painted on found book covers.

Ray Fenwick - from Mascots

(Oops, sorry about the broken link! Fixed now.)

Daily OCD: 10/19/10
Written by Mike Baehr | Filed under Zak SallyreviewsPatrick RosenkranzMegan KelsoLove and RocketsJohnny RyanJeremy TinderJaime HernandezJacques TardiDrew WeingDavid BDaily OCDComing AttractionsBoody RogersBlake BellBill Everett 19 Oct 2010 10:54 PM

Online Commentary & Diversions returns after a post-APE hiatus and subsequent sick day:

Love and Rockets: New Stories #3 [with FREE Signed Bookplate]

Review: "Good Jaime Hernandez comics are always just about the most satisfying books that money can buy, and I was so impressed with how the pleasure of seeing contemporary Maggie again for the first time in far too long [in Love and Rockets: New Stories #3] gave way to the satisfaction of seeing another building block in her curious history, and then everything turned unpleasant in a way that was equally bleak and fascinating. Watching Jaime fit everything together the way he does is breathtaking. Recommended for adult readers." – Grant Goggans, The Hipster Dad's Bookshelf

Love and Rockets Book 24: The Education of Hopey Glass

Review: It's still "Love and Rocktober" at Sean T. Collins's Attentiondeficitdisorderly: "If Ghost of Hoppers was Maggie's confrontation with adulthood, The Education of Hopey Glass serves up the equivalent for Hopey and Ray. It's fascinating to me to see where their lives have taken them versus where they were — and more importantly, what they represented to Maggie — when they were first juxtaposed. [...] What makes these two stories compelling and connects them to one another beyond the basic idea of the characters coming to terms with their age is how much the stories rely on the kinds of things only an artist of Jaime's caliber can pull off for their telling."

Prison Pit: Book 2  [Pre-Order]

Review: "Man’s oldest gynophobic horrors and most simplistic delight in sheer physical dominance are savagely delineated in this primitive, appalling, cathartic and blackly funny campaign of cartoon horror. Resplendent, triumphant juvenilia is adroitly shoved beyond all ethical limits into the darkest depths of absurdist comedy. Not for children, the faint-hearted or weak-stomached, [Prison Pit Book 2] is another non-stop rollercoaster of extreme violence, profanity and cartoon shock and awe at its most visceral and compelling. ...[T]his book is all-out over the top and flat out hilarious. Buy and see if you’re broad-minded, fundamentally honest and purely in need of ultra-adult silliness." – Win Wiacek, Now Read This!

Plug: "...Johnny Ryan’s Prison Pit Book 2... is the funniest shit I’ve read in years." – Sean Witzke, Robot 6

Like a Dog [with FREE Signed Bookplate]

Review: "Bitter, haunting stories [by Zak Sally] like 'The Man Who Killed Wally Wood' and 'The War Back Home' show a striking willingness to ask uncomfortable questions about himself and the world around him. His account of Dostoyevsky’s time in prison is a real highlight and I think marks a turning point in his storytelling ability. And the fearless, self-lacerating essay he provides at the end brings the book to a near-perfect close. Really, [Like a Dog] is a tight little collection." – Chris Mautner, Robot 6

Boody. The Bizarre Comics of Boody Rogers

Review: "There’s fourteen stories in all in this anthology, beautifully scanned, restored, and reproduced in all their four-color glory. [...] There’s a lot of fun to be had in these pages. [...] Boody properly showcases a sizeable enough collection of complete comics stories by the wildman inkslinger from Texas, finally elevating Rogers into the pantheon he’s always been part of — if only enough folks had been able to access his work. At last, they can!" – Steve Bissette, The Schulz Library Blog

Rebel Visions: The Underground Comix Revolution 1963-1975 [Revised Softcover Ed.]

Review: "The publication of Rebel Visions was a vital riposte to [a] tide of apathy, a vast and authoritative work built for the clear purpose of documenting the entire history of the US underground revolution in a definitive fashion: a not inconsiderable task given the various tributaries that have spewed forth since the early 1960s. [...] Rosenkranz diligently weaves a number of divergent themes using the oral histories of most of the major participants." – Kevin McCaighy, Exquisite Things (via ¡Journalista!)

Artichoke Tales [Pre-Order]

Interview: Kat Engh of Geek Girl on the Street chatted with Megan Kelso at APE over the weekend: "I like writing and movies and music and art forms that are about more than one thing. I’m really fascinated by that, and I think that comics really lend themselves to that kind of layering and layers in conflict, because you’ve literally got two tracks of information with pictures and words, and because they’re so separate from each other, they lend themselves to doing different things at the same time. I’ve always thought that if a comic’s not doing more than one thing, it’s not taking advantage of what is, so yeah, I’d say I actively strive for that."

Fire & Water: Bill Everett, the Sub-Mariner and the Birth of Marvel Comics [with FREE Signed Bookplate]

Interview: At Comic Book Resources, Chris Mautner talks to Fire & Water author Blake Bell at length about Bill Everett — "I think Everett is as unique a stylist as Ditko is. When you see Everett's work, you automatically know who it is if you have any inkling about any of the Silver or Golden Age artists. Secondly, in his own way he's as influential as Ditko. Without question, Everett created the antihero in superhero comics back in 1939 when he introduced the Sub-Mariner. There was no other comic book character like him." — and upcoming volumes of The Steve Ditko Archives.

Set to Sea

Interview: It's the second part of Brian Heater's conversation with Drew Weing at The Daily Cross Hatch: "It’s such a weird time where so much stuff is available online, though I went out of my way to make the book a nice little object. And I feel like it does read better in book form, because it’s a format that you can more lovingly pore over the detail."

Mome Vol. 20 - Fall 2010 [Pre-Order]

Interview: At Gapers Block, Rose Lannin talks to Jeremy Tinder, who makes his Fantagraphics debut in Mome Vol. 20. This quote is relevant to the Mome story: "I grew up reading newspaper strips, like Garfield. I think it was around age 5 when I really started getting into Garfield and tracing it out of the paper every day. [...] Garfield was my focus in life for six years, I was so into it."

http://www.fantagraphics.com/images/flog/mike/201010/armed-garden.jpg

Coming Attractions: Bleeding Cool's Rich Johnston reports here that "...[I]t seems that Fantagraphics, as part of their current attemp to to translate every French comic book in existence, has seized upon [David B.'s] book, Le Jardin armé et autres histoires or The Armed Garden and are to publish it in August next year," and here about our translation of Tardi & Manchette's Like a Sniper Lining Up His Shot, "...planned for August next year. Which, in terms of European-to-American translation is light speed."

Daily OCD: 10/14/10
Written by Mike Baehr | Filed under RIP MDreviewsMegan KelsoLove and RocketsJasonDave CooperDaily OCDComing AttractionsCarol Tylerbest american comics criticismBen Schwartzaudio 15 Oct 2010 1:18 PM

Oh nuts, I'm about to start today's Online Commentary & Diversions and noticed I never published yesterday's in my APE prep frenzy. Here it is:

RIP, M.D. [Pre-Order]

Review: "Rip M.D. is near perfect. ...[T]he art is fantastic; with original and distinct designs that border realistic and cartoony, with the best qualities of both carrying a jovial wit, which never balking on making the subject matter truly scary. And the story by Mitch Schauer is told in a clear and concise manner, taking on a sort of fairy tale tone in the beginning that sort of fades by the end. The book on the whole is kid-like in tone, but told with sophistication that one used to see in old Loony Tunes." – Mark L. Miller, Ain't It Cool News

Review: "Rip M.D. is very sweet all-ages graphic novel... For those... looking for something to share with the family, Rip is an excellent choice. The writer, Mitch Schauer, is clearly a fan of classic monsters and has really had some fun with these characters. The real gem in Rip M.D. is the artwork. Beautiful, beautiful panels that you may want to tear out of the book and put up on your walls. [...] And the colors in this book are just stunning. This is a book that warrants some extra time to just enjoy each page. [...] Ultimately, this is a book that anyone can read and enjoy that would also make an excellent gift to a young reader as a Halloween treat. Score: ★★★★★" – Stephanie Shamblin G, Comic Monsters

The Best American Comics Criticism

Review: "Most of [The Best American Comics Criticism] is enjoyable and smart, with pieces suitable for the relative comics neophyte, graphic novel enthusiast or fan of old strips from the heyday of newspapers." – Christopher Allen, Trouble With Comics

You'll Never Know Book 2: Collateral Damage [Pre-Order]

Interview: Squee! talks to Carol Tyler about You'll Never Know in an interview which will run in edited form in the new issue of Ghettoblaster Magazine: "Hardest thing I've ever taken on. So much to juggle: the storyline, the art. The mechanics of making a comic page/book. Oy! I've been at this for four years and I'm still not done! I love it, though. I've had to wrap my life around getting pages done. [...] It's an epic struggle, although worth it a thousand times over."

Bent [Pre-Order]

Interview (audio): Inkstuds host Robin McConnell chatted with fellow Canadian Dave Cooper while Dave was in Vancouver on his West Coast book tour

Artichoke Tales [Pre-Order]

Interview (audio): Guest host Lark Pien talks to Megan Kelso on the new episode of The Comix Claptrap podcast; also, Josh Frankel talks about Love and Rockets: New Stories #3 (hope he's nice; we haven't had time to listen yet)

from L'île aux 100 000 Morts - Jason

Coming Attractions: MTV Geek's David Paggi previews Jason's Isle of 100,000 Graves, coming next Spring

APE 2010 update: preview peeks!
Written by Mike Baehr | Filed under Steve DitkoStephane BlanquetLinda MedleyJasoneventsDavid BComing AttractionsBlake Bell 15 Oct 2010 7:49 AM

We're on our way to the Alternative Press Expo this weekend in San Francisco and we decided at the last minute to bring display-only copies of a few of our upcoming releases with us for lucky fans to peruse:

What I Did by Jason

Toys in the Basement by Stephane Blanquet

The Littlest Pirate King by David B.

Castle Waiting Vol. 2

Unexplored Worlds: The Steve Ditko Archives Vol. 2

Unfortunately they won't be for sale at the show (and they're not available for pre-order here on our site just yet) but at least they'll be there for the looking!

Krazy Kat: Bad News Dept.
Written by Kim Thompson | Filed under Krazy KatGeorge HerrimanComing Attractions 15 Oct 2010 6:49 AM

We are sorry to announce that several experts have confirmed that what we thought was a sketchbook of early versions of several years' worth of Krazy Kat strips created by George Herriman — and had planned to publish as such — is almost certainly the work of a very intense (perhaps contemporary with Herriman?) fan who diligently, even maniacally, copied each new strip into his sketchbook over a period of three years.

The telltale signs of this became apparent only when we had a chance to take a closer look at high-resolution scans made as part of the pre-press process, signs which made evident some flaws and quirks in the drawings that rendered its authenticity highly dubious.

I want to emphasize that the owner of the sketchbook was quite convinced as to the authenticity of this object, and the late thumbs-down from the experts came as a rude shock to him as well. No deceit was intended on anyone's part: Our delight at what we thought we'd found overruled the skepticism we should've wielded at an earlier date.

We will be sending refunds to the handful of Herriman fans who'd pre-ordered and prepaid this book, and we apologize to anyone who got their hopes up. At least we figured it out before actually going to press on the thing.

On the other side of the Herriman coin... (see next blog entry below)



Krazy Kat: Good News Dept.
Written by Kim Thompson | Filed under Krazy KatGeorge HerrimanComing AttractionsChris Ware 15 Oct 2010 6:49 AM

http://www.fantagraphics.com/images/flog/kim/krazy-12-mockup.jpg

Thank you, Chris Ware.

This, the penultimate KRAZY + IGNATZ Sundays volume (covering 1919-1921), will be available in February 2011. We should be able to wrap up the series with the 1922-1924 volume by the end of that year, leaving us free to focus on... the dailies!

Daily OCD: 10/12/10
Written by Mike Baehr | Filed under reviewsNate NealMoto HagioMomeMaurice TillieuxmangaDaily OCDComing Attractions 12 Oct 2010 4:01 PM

Today's Online Commentary & Diversions:

The Sanctuary

Review: "This debut graphic novel [The Sanctuary] ambitiously imagines the purposes of prehistoric art within the context of an imagined precivilization. Most strikingly, his tale is expressed entirely through the actions of his characters — their dialogue is written in an invented, phonetic language. [...] Neal’s dark pen work suggests texture, detail, and light effectively, and shoulders the burden of his almost-wordless storytelling. Despite some occasionally unclear moments, the broad sweep of the book’s action and ideas unmistakably raises thoughtful questions, marking Neal as an artist to watch." – Publishers Weekly

A Drunken  Dream and Other Stories [Pre-Order]

Review: "A Drunken Dream is America's long overdue introduction to Moto Hagio, in a volume worthy of the honor. [...] Hardbound with gold foil on the cover, A Drunken Dream seems part textbook, and part holy book. [...] It's a demanding read, but one in which your enjoyment will be proportionate to your emotional investment. [...] It's hard to imagine a better release for a manga, or a more deserving artist than Hagio. [...] Very recommended. Grade: A" – Thomas Zoth, Mania

Mome Vol. 11-20 Mega-Bundle [Pre-Order]

Interview: At Robot 6, Sean T. Collins talks to Mome editor Eric Reynolds on the occasion of the anthology's 5th anniversary and 20th issue: "There were always anthologies, even when the periodical market was thriving, but I think they’re even more valuable now. There are just not enough publishers to support all the good cartoonists out there. I am constantly having to reject some pretty good work because we just have a ceiling of how many books we can publish a year. It’s my least favorite part of the job. Mome is at least a small way to help offset that reality."

http://www.fantagraphics.com/images/flog/mike/201010/murderbyhightide.jpg

Coming Attractions: At The Forbidden Planet International Blog Log, Wim Lockefeer picks up on our scheduled June 2011 release of Murder by High Tide: Gil Jordan, Private Eye by Maurice Tillieux, saying "Gil Jourdan is one of the most essential BD series ever produced," and that the volume will be "the perfect book to get acquainted with this graphic genius, whose stories, in terms of timing and speed, every aspiring comics writer should read and study."

2011: One Manchette, one Manchette/Tardi!
Written by Kim Thompson | Filed under Jacques TardiComing Attractions 12 Oct 2010 9:34 AM

Two bits of news for fans of the Jacques Tardi/Jean-Patrick Manchette West Coast Blues we released last year...

Like a Sniper Lining Up His Shot by Jacques Tardi & Jean-Patrick Manchette

(1) Here is the cover to our Summer 2011 Tardi release, his latest adaptation of a Manchette novel (in fact his latest graphic novel, period, it's just being released now in France), La Position du tireur couché. (The original prose novel was released in the U.S. as The Prone Gunman, which while out of print is still available on Amazon.) Our title is Like a Sniper Lining Up His Shot. Dig ace designer Adam Grano's brilliant incorporation of that logo into the "inside page as cover" design we've been using for Tardi.

(2) Meanwhile, Random House has announced the April 2011 release, under their NYRB Classics imprint, of another Manchette classic, Fatale. Fatale was actually almost the first Tardi/Manchette collaboration, as Tardi began an adaptation of it way back in the mid-1970s and then abandoned it in favor of drawing an original Manchette story titled Griffu instead. An English language version of Griffu was published in Pictopia back in the 1990s, and a few pages of the aborted Fatale adaptation can be seen in various Tardi collections... but anyway, the original prose novel will soon be available in English for fans of French noir.