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Category >> Coming Attractions

First Look: Nuts by Gahan Wilson
Written by Mike Baehr | Filed under Gahan WilsonComing Attractions 3 Jan 2011 10:31 AM

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Teaser time! Just last week Gahan Wilson sent us the new original art for the cover of our forthcoming definitive collection of his National Lampoon strip Nuts (it's looking like a 2012 release) — here's a scan courtesy of our production wiz Paul Baresh. This one's high on my personal list of projects I'm looking forward to!

Surely you saw our big news yesterday
Written by Mike Baehr | Filed under Gary GrothDisneyComing AttractionsCarl Barks 3 Jan 2011 6:49 AM

...about a certain beloved cartoonist and his work drawing the beloved adventures of a certain beloved family of cartoon ducks, but if not, head over to Robot 6 for the exclusive scoop and interview with Gary Groth! We've been sitting on this news for a while and we couldn't be more excited. Our official announcement is in the pipeline and coming soon.

Things to See: Another page from Jason's Athos in America
Written by Mike Baehr | Filed under Things to seeJasonComing Attractions 30 Dec 2010 5:52 PM

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Pre-coloring, as presented on Jason's Cats Without Dogs blog. From the 4th story in Athos in America, a short story collection à la Low Moon due in late 2011. Jason has embraced the brush again.

Our Spring/Summer 2011 catalog!
Written by Mike Baehr | Filed under Coming Attractions 23 Dec 2010 11:30 AM

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Here's a little holiday weekend reading to get you excited for the upcoming year! This week we mailed out copies of our Spring/Summer 2011 distributors catalog (designed and produced for buyers and sellers in the book trade) to members of the press. We aren't able to print enough to send them to all our customers and fans as well, but here's the next best thing: a 7.4 MB PDF download! It's 48 pages packed full of information and preview art from dozens of upcoming releases.

Please be advised that the information in this catalog is preliminary and still subject to change, including but not limited to book titles, prices, cover art, contents, specs, and especially release dates. For instance, Ah Pook Is Here is already rescheduled from July to Fall 2011. (Also, we're already aware of all the typos.) With that caveat in mind, please enjoy and discuss!

Original pages from Congress of the Animals by Jim Woodring
Written by Mike Baehr | Filed under Original ArtJim WoodringComing Attractions 22 Dec 2010 1:24 PM

Jim Woodring original art for Congress of the Animals

As seen in our art department on November 19, 2010 — as mentioned, a banner day for originals here. View bigger here, and see here for a previous batch of original pages from the book. Congress of the Animals, the new "Frank" graphic novel from Jim Woodring, is due in Spring 2011.

Original pages from Love from the Shadows by Gilbert Hernandez
Written by Mike Baehr | Filed under Original ArtLove and RocketsGilbert HernandezComing Attractions 22 Dec 2010 1:15 PM

Gilbert Hernandez original art for Love from the Shadows

As seen on my desk on November 19, 2010, which was a good day for original art here — stay tuned for the next post. View bigger here. Love from the Shadows, the new "Fritz filmography" graphic novel from Gilbert Hernandez, is due in early Spring 2011.

Vote for Bill Everett Archives cover art, win the book
Written by Mike Baehr | Filed under contestsComing AttractionsBlake BellBill Everett 20 Dec 2010 11:29 AM

Amazing Man - Bill Everett

Blake Bell wants your input in choosing the artwork to feature on the cover of The Bill Everett Archives Vol. 1 — see the 10 candidates on Blake's blog and then cast your vote on his Bill Everett facebook page. One randomly selected voter who selects the image that eventually goes on the book will win a free copy of the book when it's published! My vote is pictured above, though obviously I recuse myself from the contest.

Daily OCD: 12/16/10
Written by Mike Baehr | Filed under Usagi YojimboStan SakaiRIP MDreviewsMoto HagioMichael KuppermanMegan KelsomangaJasonDestroy All MoviesDaily OCDComing Attractions 16 Dec 2010 5:42 PM

Today's Online Commentary & Diversions:

Artichoke Tales [Pre-Order]

Review: "[Megan Kelso's] first full-length graphic novel, Artichoke Tales, raises the stakes seen in her short stories and makes the relationships between three generations of characters one of simultaneous longing and resentment. [...] This story is entirely about relationships, both familial and romantic. At the same time, it’s also about one’s relationship to one’s country, one’s religion, and one’s ethnicity, and the ways in which resorting to war to solve conflicts changes all of these relationships irrevocably." – Rob Clough, The Comics Journal

What I Did [Pre-Order]

Review: "Jason’s work always jumps directly into the reader’s brain and heart, using the beastly and unnatural to gently pose eternal questions about basic human needs in a soft but relentless quest for answers. That you don’t ever notice the deep stuff because of the clever gags and safe, familiar 'funny-animal' characters should indicate just how good a cartoonist he is… This collection [What I Did], despite being early works resonates with the artist’s preferred themes and shines with his visual dexterity. It’s one of Jason’s very best and will warm the cockles of any fan’s heart." – Win Wiacek, Now Read This!

Usagi Yojimbo: The Special Edition [Pre-Order]

Interview: Newsarama's Chris Arrant talks to Stan Sakai about the past and future of Usagi Yojimbo: "When did I hit my stride? Well, I think Usagi really started to come together with the first four Fantagraphics issues – before that he’d appeared in short stories and anthologies, but I was able to devote a lot of attention to detail and characterization with that first story-arc. For me as a writer and artist, I think it would be 'The Kite Story.' That was the first story that I did a lot of research on, and it really came together smoothly."

RIP, M.D. [Pre-Order]

Profile: The Tulsa World's Matt Gleason talks to Rip M.D. creator Mitch Schauer: "A young Mitch Schauer often sympathized with the classic movie monsters that populated late-night TV. 'They were never really bad on purpose,' the longtime Tulsan said from his home in the San Fernando Valley of Los Angeles. Schauer particularly sympathized with Boris Karloff's Frankenstein. 'He didn't want to be created,' said the 54-year-old. 'Then he gets created, and everybody wants to throw rocks at him, crucify him or burn him. Frankenstein was just misunderstood.'"

Destroy All Movies!!!: The Complete Guide to Punks on Film [Pre-Order]

Plug: "Punk, new wave weirdos, 80's cult legends and everything in between. Alamo Drafthouse's Zack Carlson and Vulcan Video's Bryan Connolly have a shared insanity for punk rock cinema. Destroy All Movies!!! The Complete Guide to Punks on Film isn't just for horror fans, but every horror fan should own a copy." – Alison Nastasi, Cinematical (The Moviefone Blog)

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Plug: In an article on Splitsider surveying comedians about their experience on Twitter, the great Peter Serafinowicz once again name-drops his pal "genius comic artist and writer" Michael Kupperman

A Drunken  Dream and Other Stories [Pre-Order]

Plug: Attention Eisner Awards judges! At The Manga Curmudgeon, David Welsh suggests Moto Hagio and her book A Drunken Dream and Other Stories for nominations in several Eisner Award categories

The Arctic Marauder - Jacques Tardi

Coming Attractions: Library Journal plugs four of our upcoming Spring 2011 titles in their latest "Graphic Novel Prepub Alert"

Blake Bell announces The Bill Everett Archives & naming contest
Written by Mike Baehr | Filed under Coming AttractionsBlake BellBill Everett 16 Dec 2010 7:10 AM

Fire & Water by Blake Bell

It's not exactly a huge surprise, but welcome news nonetheless: Blake Bell has announced on his blog that following his biography of Bill Everett Fire & Water (seen above), we'll be publishing a series of Bill Everett Archives books that he'll be editing, in an exact repeat of his Steve Ditko bio Strange & Stranger and subsequent volumes of The Steve Ditko Archives. The first Everett Archives volume will be out in the second half of 2011 and Blake needs your help coming up with a title for it! Just as the first two volumes of The Steve Ditko Archives are Strange Suspense and Unexplored Worlds, Blake's looking for a "Something Something: The Bill Everett Archives Vol. 1" sort of thing. If Blake uses your suggestion, you win a free copy of the book when it comes out! Leave your suggestion on Blake's blog (where you'll find more information) or on his Bill Everett Facebook page.

Daily OCD: 12/13/10
Written by Mike Baehr | Filed under Tony MillionaireTim HensleyStephen DeStefanoreviewsPrince ValiantMoto HagioMegan KelsoMartimangaMaakiesLinda MedleyKevin HuizengaJohnny RyanJasonJacques TardiHal FosterGabrielle BellFrank SantoroFour Color FearDrew WeingDestroy All MoviesDaily OCDComing AttractionsCathy MalkasianBest of 2010audio 13 Dec 2010 8:25 PM

Today's Online Commentary & Diversions:

List: New York Magazine names their Top Ten Comics of 2010, including:

A Drunken  Dream and Other Stories [Pre-Order]

 #10: A Drunken Dream and Other Stories by Moto Hagio: "Ten spooky, perceptive stories of girls and ghosts in trouble from one of the masters of shojo manga, who has her work translated into English for the first time."

Set to Sea

#5: Set to Sea by Drew Weing: "He may look like a big lug, but he’s got dreams of the ocean and the heart of a poet. The hero of Weing’s salty debut sails off to adventure in this pocket-size sea-shanty of a graphic novel."

Wally Gropius

#1: Wally Gropius by Tim Hensley: "A candy-colored absurdist comedy about a teen so wealthy he barfs $100 bills, this ridiculously enjoyable book reads like Richie Rich on LSD."

Temperance

List: NPR's Glen Weldon names Cathy Malkasian's Temperance one of "The Year's Most Transporting Books": "Amnesia also plays a role in Cathy Malkasian's huge, haunting — and hauntingly beautiful — graphic novel Temperance. [...] Malkasian's plot is loose and elliptical, and she pokes at many of the same salty psychological truths that made the Brothers Grimm so grim; lies, guilt and violence buffet her characters about like gale-force winds. You won't know where the story's going, but Malkasian's pages are gorgeous, sweetly melancholic things, and you'll enjoy the trip."

Review: "...[One of the] Books of the Year... An expansive allegorical fable, ...Temperance speaks to our times with prophetic pointedness. [...] A uniquely imaginative book, Temperance is an example of how a sepia-toned pencil can sing." – Neel Mukherjee, The Times

Prison Pit: Book 2  [Pre-Order]

List: At Attentiondeficitdisorderly, Sean T. Collins names Prison Pit Book 2 by Johnny Ryan one of his Comics of the Year of the Day, saying "take how you felt during the baseball-bat scene in Casino, then make a book out of it."

You Are There

List: British cartoonist Matt Brooker offers up his Best of the Year at the Forbidden Planet International Blog Log, including 2009's You Are There by Jacques Tardi & Jean-Claude Forest: "Alongside Mœbius’ The Airtight Garage of Jerry Cornelius, this is the defining classic of 1970’s Bande Dessinee, but unlike The Airtight Garage you really need to be able to read the dialogue to make it worth owning… this first English translation has been much too long coming, so I was delighted to be able to read You Are There at last. It was originally conceived as a screenplay, and reads like one of those particularly mad Sixties films (like Peter Sellers’ Casino Royale or The Magic Christian) of which I’m so unreasonably fond."

Review: "The always-superb Jason too has a book out this year: Werewolves of Montpellier. Droll, laconic as always, dry as drought, and hilarious and sympathetic in equal measures... A mad, lovely and bright book." – Neel Mukherjee, The Times

Almost Silent

Review: "While we’re on the subject of Jason, it wouldn’t do to leave out a mention of Almost Silent, a deluxe collection of four of his earlier books... The book is worth searching out for [You Can’t Get There From Here] alone. It’s the longest story in the book and is a retelling of the Frankenstein story as a love triangle without words, set off by a Greek chorus-type duet between two hunchbacks." – Neel Mukherjee, The Times

Destroy All Movies!!!: The Complete Guide to Punks on Film [Pre-Order]

Review: "Destroy All Movies is a product of the tireless DIY work ethic: It is one of the most painstaking books ever written on punk rock. As such, it stands in the rarified league of Banned in DC, Fucked Up & Photocopied, and the long out-of-print masterpiece Loud 3D. Carlson and Connolly have managed to make a volume with both intellectual relevance and deep entertainment value. And if you don't have time to actually read through all 1,000 entries, it's still a blast just to look at." – Sam McPheeters, Bookforum

Plug: On the Matablog, Matador Records co-founder Gerard Cosloy says "If I celebrated Xmas and/or hadn’t already purchased a copy, I’d be asking Satan Santa for the newly published Destroy All Movies!!!..." and calls it an "amazing tome" (link via our own Janice Headley)

Plug: "This book is out of control. [...] The research that went into [Destroy All Movies!!!] is unfathomable. They even tracked down every instance of a punk in a made-for-TV movie. The mind boggles. And then the mind puts on a Crass album and head butts some prep in the face." – Kyle Olson, The Hipster Book Club "2010 Holiday Gift Guide"

Castle Waiting Vol. 2

Review: "Castle Waiting’s a pleasant, upbeat series, a great way to spend a quiet afternoon. If you’re looking for high adventure and action, it’s not here. This series is exploring the quiet places and the emotional beats that exist just beyond the screaming and bloodshed, and it’s doing so with style and wit. Castle Waiting comes highly recommended." – Michael C. Lorah, Newsarama

Four Color Fear: Forgotten Horror Comics of the 1950s [Pre-Order]

Review: "EC was not the only company putting out good horror comics in the 1950s. Fantagraphics’ Four Color Fear: Forgotten Horror Comics of the 1950s shines the spotlight on some of the other comic publishers who were putting out great horror comics back then. [...] As great as the stories are perhaps the best feature is the 20 page note section that provides details behind each of the 40 stories in the book with fantastic anecdotes. There is also an index to all the companies publishing horror comics with a listing of titles and issue numbers making this a fantastic resource. Grade A+" – Tim Janson, Mania

Little Maakies on the Prairie

Review: "Since continuity usually plays second fiddle to the avalanche of inventive ideas, the strips can be read in almost any order and the debauched drunkenness, manic ultra-violence in the manner of the best Tom & Jerry or Itchy & Scratchy cartoons, acerbic view of sexuality and deep core of existentialist angst (like Sartre ghostwriting The Office or perhaps The Simpsons) still finds a welcome with Slackers, Laggards, the un-Christian and all those scurrilous, lost Generations after X. [...] If you’re the kind of fan who thrives on gorge-rousing gags and mind-bending rumination this is a fantastic and rewarding strip, one of the most constantly creative and entertaining on the market today and this latest collection [Little Maakies on the Prairie] is one of the very best yet. If you’re not a fan of Maakies this is the ideal chance to become one and if you’re already converted it’s the perfect gift for someone what ain’t…" – Win Wiaceck, Now Read This!

Prince Valiant Vol. 2: 1939-1940

Review: "This series is a non-stop rollercoaster of action and romance, blending realistic fantasy with sardonic wit and broad humour with unbelievably stirring violence, all rendered in an incomprehensibly lovely panorama of glowing art. Beautiful, captivating and utterly awe-inspiring Prince Valiant is a World Classic of storytelling, and this magnificent deluxe [Volume 2] is something no fan can afford to be without. If you have never experienced the majesty and grandeur of the strip this astounding and enchanting premium collection is the best way possible to start and will be your gateway to a life-changing world of wonder and imagination." – Win Wiacek, Now Read This!

 

Artichoke Tales [Pre-Order]

Review: "One could easily spend hours thinking of the hard concepts Kelso brings into the book without ever hitting the reader over the head with any of them. It's a sign of her storytelling ability that we get all of this without it ever feeling like she's preaching to me. [...] Artichoke Tales, at its heart, is about how complex the world is, with no one quite able to figure things out. ...I thought this was a well-crafted book that shows the human side of a conflict. It's a sad tale, but one worth reading." – Rob McMonigal, Panel Patter

Lucky in Love Book 1: A Poor Man's History [with FREE Signed Bookplate]

Plug: Cartoon Brew's 2010 Holiday Gift guide includes Lucky in Love Book 1: A Poor Man’s History by George Chieffet and Stephen DeStefano

Interview: Comic Book Resources' Chris Mautner has a very informative chat with our own Kim Thompson about our new line of all-ages Eurocomics books: "Well, to be honest, I’m not sure how many kids will actually be reading this. It’s hard to get kids interested in comics, and foreign comics are even tougher. I’d welcome kids reading it but I’m assuming 98% of the audience will be grown-ups who dig this particular material. That said, I’m always a little baffled by how sensitive grown-ups are about kids’ material."

Gabrielle Bell

Interview: At AfterEllen, Ariel Schrag talks to Gabrielle Bell: "I definitely prefer reading fiction to reading comics, except for a very small percentage of comics. And when I was a teenager I wanted to be a fiction writer. I’m much more interested in films, too. I feel like I’m more interested in the potential of comics, rather than what they’ve already accomplished, whereas with films and novels I’m interested in what they’ve already accomplished."

Kevin Huizenga

Panel (Audio): Inkstuds presents a recording of the roundtable with Kevin Huizenga and Jim Rugg, moderated by Frank Santoro, which took place at the Pittsburgh Indy Comics Expo back in October of this year

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Coming Attractions: Bleeding Cool's latest find in our Spring/Summer 2011 catalog: The Cabbie Vol. 1 by Marti