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Sock Monkey: Into the Deep Woods
Sock Monkey: Into the Deep Woods
$16.99
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Peanuts Every Sunday: 1956-1960 (Vol. 2)
Peanuts Every Sunday: 1956-1960 (Vol. 2)
$49.99
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The Complete Peanuts 1953-1954 (Vol. 2) [Softcover Ed.]
The Complete Peanuts 1953-1954 (Vol. 2) [Softcover Ed.]
$22.99
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The Complete Peanuts 1950-1954 (Vols. 1 - 2) Gift Box Set Softcover Ed.]
The Complete Peanuts 1950-1954 (Vols. 1 - 2) Gift Box Set Softcover Ed.]
$39.99
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Category >> Crockett Johnson

Labor Day Sale: 40% Off Select Titles
Written by Jen Vaughn | Filed under Wilfred SantiagoTrina RobbinsTony MillionaireStephen Weissmansales specialsR Kikuo JohnsonPatrick RosenkranzMonte SchulzMiss Lasko-GrossMegan KelsoJordan CraneFredrik StrömbergEsther Pearl WatsonDaniel ClowesCrockett JohnsonChuck ForsmanCharles M SchulzCarol SwainBen Schwartz 28 Aug 2014 9:29 AM

2014 Labor Day Sale

As the leaves begin to turn shades of red and orange (or fall straight off and green depending on where you live), backpacks are dusted off in preparation for a new load of textbooks, and we move into fall, we figure you could use some cause for celebration. How about our Labor Day/Back-To-School Sale? We've got great titles of all-ages, young-adult, and non-fiction titles at a whopping 40% Off from Saturday, August 30th through Monday, September 1st!

Batter Up, Charlie Brown! by Charles M. Schulz Chocolate Cheeks by Steven Weissman 21

For your wee ones, how about our gift-sized, baseball-themed Peanuts book, Batter Up, Charlie Brown? Or, for something a little cheekier, there's Steven Weissman's Chocolate Cheeks. For the baseball fans who want a bit more history mixed in, try 21: The Story of Roberto Clemente by Wilfred Santiago

Unlovable Unlovable 2 Caricature

School can be anything you make of it, especially you don't give a damn. For the guy or girl that knows everything, try Unlovable 1 and 2 by Esther Pearl Watson. She may only break wind and not hearts, but Tammy Pierce is unstoppable. For some short stories from all walks of life, ugly and less ugly, grab Daniel ClowesCaricature, often compared to to Nabokov for their complex naturalism and sense of humor.

Ghost World  Celebrated Summer Night Fisher
Is cutting class altogether a common memory for you? How about a classic Fantagraphics alternative comic, sure to win even the most jaded of hearts: Daniel ClowesGhost World (now in its 20th printing) is for you. Already have it? Try the male version of Ghost World, Celebrated Summer by Charles Forsman, that came out in 2014. Night Fisher by R. Kikuo Johnson also follows the teenage trail of growing up and growing apart.

Giraffes in my Hair Mess Everything The Squirrel Mother
Cutting class was too weak? You just dropped out all together? Damn, you might enjoy Giraffes in My Hair, a Jack Kerouac-style story lived by Bruce Paley and drawn by his partner, Carol Swain, all about the summer of '67. On the cusp of flunking out with a drug habit, A Mess of Everything by Miss Lasko-Gross, is an intense and raw look at her own high-school experience. If you're looking for more personal and semi-autobiographical comic stories look no further than The Squirrel Mother by Megan Kelso. It also contains stories about the idea of America and American history, such as a trilogy of short pieces about Alexander Hamilton.

Rebel Visions Pretty in Ink Daniel Clowes Reader
If history is your school-time jam, then grab a copy of Rebel Visions by Patrick Rosenkranz, a history of the alternative cartoonists. Want something even more focused?  A history of women cartoonist will suit you just fine in Pretty In Ink: North American Women Cartoonists 1896-2013 by Trina Robbins. Or the Daniel Clowes Reader, featuring most of Clowes' work and papers on the overriding motifs and themes.  

Black Images in the Comics  American
Consider some new books about comics as an assignment for a graded discussion. Black Images in the Comics by Fredrik Strömberg walks through comics, old and new, to enlighten the audience about the hideous caricatures racism produces so that we may never stray there again. Best American Comics Criticism compiled by Ben Schwartz features the best essays on comics from Chris Ware on Rodolphe Töpffer, Dan Clowes on Mad's Will Elder, The Daily Show's John Hodgman on Jack Kirby and more!

Clouds above Barnaby 1 Sock Monkey Treasury

For those who wish to rise above it all and forget that school ever existed, The Clouds Above is an all-ages full-color romp with a boy and his cat by Jordan Crane. Meanwhile, Barnaby by Crockett Johnson plays with some imaginary creatures including his fairy godfather. Or for something that feels a bit older, more Victorian The Sock Monkey Treasury by Tony Millionaire is for you.

The Last Rose of Summer 
Finally a little prose by Monte Schulz, the novel The Last Rose of Summer. With the Great Depression looming, three strong-minded women related by marriage form an uneasy household in a Southern town.

So clean up on some comics to read while the kids are out at school or to distract you from the textbooks you SHOULD be reading. 









Fantagraphics at San Diego Comic-Con - The Debuts
Written by Jen Vaughn | Filed under witzendWally WoodWallace WoodShimura TakakoSergio PonchioneS Clay Wilsonnew releasesLucy KnisleyLove and RocketsLane MilburnJohn SeverinJoe OrlandoJim WoodringGilbert HernandezFloyd GottfredsonEleanor DavisEd PiskorEC ComicsDrew FriedmanDon RosaDisneyDash ShawCrockett JohnsonCCIBarnabyAl Feldstein 14 Jul 2014 3:37 PM

CCi 

This is your official warning to bring your heavy duty bags and library book carts because here are our San Diego Comic Con graphic novel and comic debuts. Need a workout? Well, you're gonna get it by grasping our beautiful tomes to your chest as you happily leave, arms full from a fun time at Fantagraphics, booth #1718! 

How to be Happy

 How to Be Happy is Eleanor Davis's first collection of graphic/literary short stories collecting the best stories she's drawn for Mome, Nobrow, and Lucky Peach, as well in her own self-published comics. Davis achieves a rare, subtle poignancy in her narratives that are at once compelling and elusive, pregnant with mystery and a deeply satisfying emotional resonance. Happy shows the full range of Davis's skills — sketchy drawing, polished pen-and-ink line work, and meticulously designed full-color painted panels — which are always in the service of a narrative that builds to a quietly devastating climax. In stores August, $24.99

An Age of License

 An Age of License is Lucy Knisley's (French MilkRelish) comics travel memoir recounting her charming (and romantic!) tour of Europe and Scandinavia. Featuring her hallmark mouth-watering drawings and descriptions of food, Knisley's experiences are colored by anxieties, introspective self-inquiries — about traveling alone in unfamiliar countries, and about her life — that many young adults will relate to. It's is an Eat, Pray, Love for the alternative comics fan. In Stores August, $19.99



Son of the SunWalt Disney's Uncle Scrooge and Donald Duck: The Son of the Sun (The Don Rosa Library Vol. 1) by Don Rosa - The Richest Duck in the World is back — and so are noisy nephew Donald, wunderkinder Huey, Dewey, and Louie, and rascally richnik Flintheart Glomgold! We’re proud to present our first complete, chronological book of Duck adventures by contemporary fan favorite Don Rosa, who drew a whopping two decades’ worth of ripping Scrooge and Donald yarns! It's at a price even Scrooge would consider a bargain! In stores September, $29.99. 

heroresHeroes of the Comics: Portraits of the Legends of Comic Books by Drew Friedman - Featuring approximately 75 full-color portraits and essays lovingly rendered and chosen by Drew Friedman. Heroes includes the full spectrum of American comics pioneers and legends of the ‘30s to the ‘50s: publishers, editors, and artists like Stan Lee, Harvey Kurtzman, Will Eisner, Al Jaffee, Jack Davis, Will Elder, Bill Gaines, and more. It’s a Hall of Fame of comic book history from the man Boing Boing calls "America’s greatest living portrait artist!" In stores August, $34.99 

 

Hip Hop Family Tree 2

Hip Hop Family Tree Vol. 2 by Ed PiskorBook 2 covers the early years of 1981-1983, when Hip Hop makes its big transition from the parks and rec rooms to downtown clubs and vinyl records. While many performers use flamboyant personas to stand out from the audience, a young group called RUN-DMC comes on the scene to take things back to the streets. This volume introduces superstars like NWA, The Beastie Boys, Doug E Fresh, KRS One, ICE T, and early Public Enemy, with cameos by Dolemite, LL Cool J, Notorious BIG, and New Kids on the Block(?!)!

In stores August, $27.99.

Box setHip Hop Family Tree Box Set by Ed PiskorTo celebrate the critical success of the first two volumes of Piskor's unprecedented history of Hip Hop, we are offering the two books in a mind-blowingly colorful slipcase, drawn and designed by the artist, featuring exclusive all-new cover art on each volume. Also included is the box set exclusive 24-page comic Hip Hop Family Tree #300, Piskor’s elegant reflection on the ‘90s confluence of hip hop and comics, told in a perfect parody/pastiche/homage to that era’s Image comics. In stores November, $59.99. 


 

JIMJim by Jim WoodringJim is a mind-bending collection of all of Woodring's best non-Frank creative work — comics stories, prose stories, drawings, and paintings all centered around Woodring's cartoon alter ego. This fictional doppelganger has for 30 years inhabited Woodring's alternate universe where shifting, phantasmagoric landscapes, abrupt, hallucinatory visual revelations, and unexpected eruptions of uninhibited verbal self-flagellation are commonplace. Collected here for the first time, Jim is a bounty of Woodring's inspired artistry. In stores late July, $29.99. 

 

Luba and her Family

Love and Rockets Library (Palomar & Luba Book 4): Luba and Her Family by Gilbert HernandezBeto's characters bid "Farewell, My Palomar" as they exit the Eden of the Central American town in Volume 10 of the Love and Rockets Library. When an earthquake levels Palomar, ever-resourceful Luba and her clan are on the move once again. In the U.S., the lives of Maria's daughters — mayor and matriarch Luba, body-builder Petra, and therapist/film star Fritz — and their families become more and more intertwined. In stores now, $18.99.

Cosplayers 2Cosplayers 2 by Dash ShawThe "Cosplayers" chronicle continues as Annie and Verti attend the 3-day anime convention "Tezukon." entering the competition as Princess Mononoke and the Devil May Cry Lady. During the convention they face off against a Street Fighter 2 Cammy, encounter two otaku boys who are obsessed with their youtube videos, and meet a manga scholar named Ben Baxter, who sleeps in a dumpster outside of the hotel and receives visions of the ending of Tezuka's unfinished "Phoenix" saga. "Cosplayers 2" is a sweet, funny, melancholic ode to the anime convention experience!

In stores now, $5.00. 

 

BarnabyBarnaby Vol. 2 by Crockett Johnson; edited by Eric Reynolds and Philip Nel - The long-lost comic strip masterpiece by Crockett Johnson, legendary children’s book author (Harold and the Purple Crayon), designed by graphic novelist and Barnaby superfan Daniel Clowes. Vol. 2 collects the years 1944-1945 of the series, as five-year-old Barnaby Baxter and his cigar-chomping, bumbling con-artist Fairy Godfather J.J. O’Malley encounter leprechauns, gnomes, ghosts, ermine hunters, soap salesmen, and more! In stores now, $39.99.

Bomb Run

Bomb Run and Other Stories (The EC Comics Library) by John SeverinCombining the taut emotional and psychological insights of Stephen Crane with the gritty verisimilitude of eyewitness reportage, Harvey Kurtzman and John Severin, with inker and friend Will Elder, produced 34 war stories in just under three years. Emotionally draining and dramatically eloquent, this book collects epic settings: the Roman empire; the Revolutionary War; the American-Indian Wars; the Alamo; the Civil War; World War I (in trenches and in air); World War II ; and the Korean War. In stores now, $29.99.

DKWDKW: Ditko Kirby Wood by Sergio PonchioneAn exquisite tribute to three of the most acclaimed comic book artists of all time: Steve Ditko, Jack Kirby and Wallace Wood! Acclaimed Italian cartoonist Sergio Ponchione pays tribute to this "holy trinity" in this wildly imaginative one-shot comic, split into three chapters, with each chapter drawn in a pitch-perfect homage to one of his idols.

In stores now, $4.99.

 

 



Wandering Son 7 Wandering Son 7 by Shimura Takako - Takako's groundbreaking, critically acclaimed, and beloved Wandering Son continues to explore gender identity among its cast of middle school students in our 7th volume. Nitori-kun gets his first signs of acne. This may well be the end of the world - unless Anna-chan can help. Meanwhile, Nitori-kun and Chiba-san are scouted by the theater club, leading to friction with Takatsuki-san. 

In stores August, $24.99. 


 

Judgment Day

 Judgment Day and Other Stories (The EC Comics Library) illustrated by Joe OrlandoJudgment Day collects 23 of Joe Orlando’s best sci-fi comics, including Al Feldstein adaptations with classic O. Henry-style endings. With its blunt anti-racism message, the title story is one of EC’s most famous: after publisher Bill Gaines and Feldstein having fought the Comics Code to keep the story’s last panel (and thus its whole point) intact, “Judgment Day” became the last story in the last comic book EC published. Also included are outstanding Ray Bradbury adaptations and EC’s “Adam Link,” which was later adapted for The Outer Limits TV show featuring Leonard Nimoy. In stores now, $23.99.

Pirates in the Heartland Pirates in the Heartland: The Mythology of S. Clay Wilson Vol. 1 by S. Clay Wilson; edited by Patrick Rosenkranz - The first of a three-volume biography and retrospective, Pirates is the definitive account of the boldest and most audacious of the legendary underground cartoonists. Combining first person accounts from his peers with S. Clay Wilson’s own words, this book stands as a revealing portrait of a rebel who hid his shyness behind brash behavior and bluster.Pirates in the Heartland shows us an artist who truly lived his dreams and his nightmares. In stores now, $34.99.

 

Twelve Gems

Twelve Gems by Lane Milburn - The mysterious Dr. Z has enlisted three space heroes to search the galaxy for the fabled Twelve Gems of Power: the hulking alien-brawn Furz; the beautiful and deadly sabre-wielding Venus; and the soft-spoken canine technician, Dogstar. They meet many strange and storied characters on their journey, but none so strange or sinister as their dear benefactor himself. With a heavy dose of humor and wall-to-wall action, this sci-fi epic is one of the most action-packed and funny books of the year.

In stores now, $19.99


Mickey Mouse Walt Disney's Mickey Mouse Vol. 5: Outwits the Phantom Blot by Floyd GottfredsonOur latest book finds Mickey battling "Mighty Whalehunter" Pegleg Pete on the high seas, meeting a powerful genie, and taking on Disney’s greatest villain — the vile Phantom Blot! Lovingly restored from Disney's original proof sheets, this volume also includes more than 30 pages of extras: including rare behind-the-scenes art, vintage publicity material, and fascinating commentary by a most-wanted list of Disney scholars. In stores July, $34.99

witzend witzend by Wallace Wood and various artists - When the formulaic constraints, censorious nature, and onerous lack of creators' rights in mainstream comics got to be too much for the brilliant cartoonist Wallace Wood in 1966, he struck out on his own with the self-published witzend. It became a haven for Wood and his fellow professional cartoonist friends where they could produce the kind of personal work that they wanted to do, without regard to commercial demands — and with friends like Frank Frazetta, Al Williamson, Reed Crandall, Ralph Reese, Archie Goodwin, Angelo Torres, Steve Ditko, Harvey Kurtzman, Will Elder, Art Spiegelman, Don Martin, Vaughn Bodé, Jim Steranko, Jeff Jones, Howard Chaykin, Trina Robbins, Bernie Wrightson, and literally dozens more, it was bound to be a great ride! Now, Fantagraphics presents the complete run of witzend in this beautiful slipcased two-volume set with a special introduction by Bill Pearson and a history by Patrick Rosenkranz. In stores now, $125.00

Barnaby Vol. 2 Errata
Written by Jen Vaughn | Filed under errataCrockett JohnsonBarnaby 27 Jun 2014 12:11 PM
Barnaby 
Barnaby, the comic strip that welled up from the infamous inkpot of Crockett Johnson, who also greated Harold and the Purple Crayon, is chock fulla World War 2 information and allusions. Being a newspaper strip intended for children though, it's not a barrier to reading the comic.  "You don't need to get all of Crockett Johnson's allusions to enjoy his classic strip, Barnaby. But I'm the sort of person who wants to know these things," writes Philip Nel, co-editor of the Barnaby series and Johnson's biographer. For those who like a little inside baseball, Nel has posted a few corrections that readers have sent in already for Barnaby  Vol. 2. Cushlamachree! We always knew you guys were a well-read lot and appreciate it when you step up to the mic. Happy Reading!
Barnaby mic 
Barnaby Vol. 2 by Crockett Johnson - Now in Stock
Written by Mike Baehr | Filed under new releasesCrockett Johnson 22 May 2014 4:30 PM

Just arrived and shipping now from our mail-order department:

Barnaby Vol. 2 by Crockett Johnson

Barnaby Vol. 2
by Crockett Johnson

376-page black & white/color 11" x 6.75" hardcover • $35.00
ISBN: 978-1-60699-709-3

See Previews / Order Now

Resuming our noble undertaking: The long-lost comic strip masterpiece by Crockett Johnson, legendary creator of Harold and the Purple Crayon, collected in full! Barnaby's deft balance of whimsical fantasy, timeless humor, and elegant cartooning will delight readers of all ages.

Barnaby Vol. 2 by Crockett Johnson - Photoset Preview
Written by Mike Baehr | Filed under previewsnew releasesCrockett Johnson 7 May 2014 11:34 AM

"There's no way Jack Kerouac, along with every other self-consciously cool person in New York, wasn't reading this. O'Malley turns into Neal Cassady, the guy who's not quite human, who never shuts up, who drives you crazy, and who can make anything happen, just like that." – Griel Marcus, The Believer

"…[Barnaby] radiates human warmth and whimsy... The artist's brilliantly-written characters... keep their feet planted in the all-too-real world of 1940s America while flying off on pink wings into one of the greatest fantasy strips ever made." – Art Spiegelman

“Yes, there are dozens of other strips worth rereading, but none are this Great; this is great like Beethoven, or Steinbeck, or Picasso. This is so great it lives in its own timeless bubble of oddness and truth...” – Chris Ware

"I think, and I’m trying to talk calmly, that Barnaby and his friends and oppressors are the most important additions to American arts and letters in Lord knows how many years." – Dorothy Parker

Barnaby Vol. 2
by Crockett Johnson

376-page black & white/color 11" x 6.75" hardcover • $35.00
ISBN: 978-1-60699-709-3

Due to arrive in about 2-4 weeks. Click the thumbnails for larger versions; get more info, see more previews and pre-order your copy here:

http://www.fantagraphics.com/barnaby2

Barnaby Vol. 2 by Crockett Johnson - Video/Photo Slideshow Preview
Written by Mike Baehr | Filed under videopreviewsnew releasesCrockett Johnson 17 Apr 2014 12:08 PM

Barnaby Vol. 2
by Crockett Johnson

376-page black & white/color 11" x 6.75" hardcover • $35.00
ISBN: 978-1-60699-709-3

Ships in: May 2014 (subject to change) — Pre-Order Now

The long-lost comic strip masterpiece by Crockett Johnson, legendary children's book author (Harold and the Purple Crayon, The Carrot Seed), collected in full and designed by graphic novelist and Barnaby superfan Daniel Clowes (Ghost World, Wilson).

Vol. 2 collects the years 1944-1945 of five-year-old Barnaby Baxter and his Fairy Godfather J.J. O'Malley's misadventures. The cigar-chomping, bumbling con-artist and fast-talker O'Malley takes Barnaby on a trip to D.C. to serve his term in Congress, and introduces Launcelot McSnoyd, the invisible leprechaun and fellow member of the Elves, Leprechauns, Gnomes, and the Little Men's Chowder and Marching Society. Also, Gus the Ghost and O'Malley follow the Baxters to their seaside cottage, enlisting Barnaby to join them on a treasure hunt. Plus Wall St., Ermine hunters, soap salesmen and more!

Adored by all ages, Barnaby's deft balance of fantasy, timeless humor and elegant cartooning will delight even the most sophisticated reader, much as it did in its original run, attracting fans as diverse as Dorothy Parker, Charles Schulz, W.C. Fields, Gardner Rea, Milton Caniff, Rockwell Kent and Louis Untermeyer.

View Video & Photo Slideshow Preview in New Window

Barnaby Vol. 2 cover photo

Barnaby Vol. 2 by Crockett Johnson - First Look
Written by Mike Baehr | Filed under Jules FeifferDaniel ClowesCrockett JohnsonComing Attractions 7 Apr 2014 11:54 AM

Barnaby Vol. 2 cover photo

Barnaby Vol. 2 pages photo

Cushlamochree, our advance copies of Barnaby Vol. 2 are here! It's two full years of Crockett Johnson's charming and witty daily strip, with the requisite scholarly bonus materials in the front and back. Looks great, huh? Daniel Clowes is designing this series of 5 hardcovers for us with a spare look that echoes the original paperback collections and perfectly suits Johnson's clear-line drawing style. Also, we mightn't've mentioned previously, this volume boasts a foreword by the great Jules Feiffer!

Copies should be available about 2 months from now — you can pre-order yours and read a free excerpt we just posted last week right here.

Barnaby Vol. 2 by Crockett Johnson - Excerpt
Written by Mike Baehr | Filed under previewsCrockett JohnsonComing Attractions 3 Apr 2014 11:50 AM

Gosh! The second volume of our acclaimed series collecting Crockett Johnson's beloved strip Barnaby is fluttering its way here on pink Fairy Godfather wings, with two years of strips from 1944-1945, insightful bonus essays, and a handsome hardcover package designed by Daniel Clowes

Our downloadable excerpt has all the strips from January, 1944, plus the Table of Contents and a bit of incidental stuff. When Barnaby's dad installs a gym in the basement, Mr. O'Malley starts training Gus the Ghost to take on Launcelot McSnoyd the leprechaun in a pugilistic contest, and when Gus, out jogging, stumbles into a flooded brook, plans for the great O'Malley Dam project get underway, sort of. Enjoy the strips, be on the lookout for more previews, and pre-order the book for delivery in a couple of months or so.

Barnaby Vol. 2 by Crockett Johnson

Errata: Barnaby Vol. 1, page 243
Written by Mike Baehr | Filed under errataCrockett JohnsonBarnaby 6 Jan 2014 12:17 PM

Barnaby Vol. 1 page 243

Dept. of errata: Due to a production error, the September 30, 1943 strip was mistakenly printed with a repeated panel in Barnaby Vol. 1. Click here or on the image above to view and download a printable PDF of the corrected page. Please accept our apologies and regrets.

Daily OCD 8.06.13
Written by Jen Vaughn | Filed under Willard MullinWalt KellyUlli LustTony MillionaireShimura TakakoSamuel R DelanyMoto HagioMia WolffMarc SobelLove and RocketsLeslie SteinKristy ValentiKipp FriedmanKim ThompsonKim DeitchJulia GfrörerJasonJames RombergerJaime HernandezJacques TardiHal FosterGraham ChaffeeGilbert HernandezFloyd GottfredsonEC ComicsDisneyDavid WojnarowiczDavid BDash ShawDanny BlandDaily OCDCrockett JohnsonCathy MalkasianCarl BarksAnders NilsenAl Williamson 6 Aug 2013 3:04 PM
The latest, largest kaiju monsters of Online Commentaries and Criticism:
 
 
• Review: New School in The A.V. Club. "Like Anders Nilsen, Dash Shaw has spent his career looking for a creatively profitable middle ground between high art and straightforward comics storytelling.…Shaw riffs on the popular culture of the ’90s and the politics of the ’00s, suggesting that the children of one decade grew up too cut off from reality to understand the part they played in fostering the global conflict of the next. The social commentary in New School provides a sharp accent to a formally daring, at times alarming coming-of-age tale," says Noel Murray.
 
• Review: New School in Paste Magazine.  "Dash Shaw is a relentless experimenter, never content to rely on the processes and approaches that garnered him acclaim the last go-round…Shaw’s ability to confidently follow his muse without justifying any artistic approach is part of what makes him such an exciting voice, and one that continues to refine itself with this excellent book," wrote Hillary Brown.
 
• Review: Mental Floss on New School. "Dash Shaw is one of the new generation of exciting comic creators who exist in a nexus between comics and the New York contemporary art scene... A glance at the pages here shows a bold, unusual use of color that seems part Power Mastrs, part Asterios Polyp," writes Rich Barrett. 
 
• Review: Comics Alliance reviews Dash Shaw's New School. John Parker writes, "New School is surreal, emotional, and delirious with color…Moving, innovative, and beautiful, it's hard to imagine you'd confuse the woozy, dreamsick, and explosively colored pages of New School for any other artist's, no matter what distance you're viewing them from." 
 
• Interview (audio): Dash Shaw is interviewed on Robin McConnell's Inkstuds again! 
 
• Plug: New School in The Austin American Statesmen. "on first read, it is melancholic, funny and smartly impressionistic, three things that comics do well…Dash Shaw likes to move through styles, and it’s exciting. As soon as you think you have a fix on his forms, he tweaks it just a bit," writes Joe Gross. 
 
 
• Review: NPR lists Today is the Last Day of the Rest of Your Life as one of the five touching comics of summer. "Lust's desire to experience real life and to learn things beyond books is by turns uplifting and painful, funny and frightening…The result is a modern coming-of-age story that addresses the thrills and consequences of being young, idealistic, and more than a little lucky," Myla Goldberg sums up.
 
• Review: The National Post on Today is the Last Day of the Rest of Your Life by Ulli Lust. "Last Day is, essentially, a memoir of powerlessness, of how fruitless our attempts to shape our own lives can be - a fact often reflected in her lines, simple and crisp but frequently lost in the chaos of big scenes.…It's an honesty, intimate and universal, that comics capture better than any medium, and Lust's entry is an almost perfect instance," states David Berry. 
 
• Review: Slant Magazine looks at Today is the Last Day of the Rest of Your Life by Ulli Lust. Tim Peters says, "…it's spontaneous, sexual, and both cynically and internationally adventurous. It's also further proof that the graphic novel is going to dethrone the novel as the 21st century's preferred form for telling a story…A good way to think about Today Is the Last Day is as a kind of anti-Eat, Pray, Love."
 
• Plug: Cleaver Magazine on Today is the Last Day of the Rest of Your Life by Ulli Lust. "…the beauty of this graphic memoir is in the way, image by image and line by line, it captures that yearning and its momentary fulfillments in the shapes of breathtaking, carefully drawn landscapes, or drawings that depict Ulli's surreal fantasies, like her body floating happily over the Spanish stairs," writes Tahneer Oksman
 
• Review: Cult Montreal enjoys Today is the Last Day of the Rest of Your Life by Ulli Lust. "Today is the Last Day of the Rest of Your Life is a gripping read that feels like a story a close friend might tell you after returning from a long voyage. Lust's lively illustration style and enthralling narrative voice make this graphic novel a feminist On the Road for the twenty-first century," writes Jeff Miller.
 
• Plug: Largehearted Boy lists Today is the Last Day of the Rest of Your Life by Ulli Lust as one of the picks of the week "It's a frank, funny, occasionally brutal coming-of-age story…There's plenty of sex, drugs, and violence, though it's Lust's insight and sensitivity that really make it shine," writes The Librarie Drawn & Quarterly Bookstore.
 

Today is the Last Day of the Rest of Your Life is a gripping read that feels like a story a close friend might tell you after returning from a long voyage. Lust’s lively illustration style and enthralling narrative voice make this graphic novel a feminist On the Road for the twenty-first century. - See more at: http://cultmontreal.com/2013/07/comics-review-ulli-lust-tom-gauld-joe-ollmann/#sthash.5LDUqr84.dpuf

Today is the Last Day of the Rest of Your Life is a gripping read that feels like a story a close friend might tell you after returning from a long voyage. Lust’s lively illustration style and enthralling narrative voice make this graphic novel a feminist On the Road for the twenty-first century. - See more at: http://cultmontreal.com/2013/07/comics-review-ulli-lust-tom-gauld-joe-ollmann/#sthash.5LDUqr84.dpu
 
 
• Interview: Matt Seneca interviews Charles Forsman of The End of the Fucking World and being compared to Charles Schulz on Comics Alliance. "It is very much about being fucked-up when you are a teen and that should be a timeless idea. We all go through that. I guess the 80s thing is something that I use as an atmospheric reference for myself," says Forsman. "Forsman managed to do what even the most talented cartoonists often have difficulty with, fusing the honesty of presentation and uninflected realism native to classic alternative comics with the white-knuckle pace and jaw-clenching cliffhangers of the best action storytelling," writes Seneca.
 
• Interview: Chuck Forsman talks about mini-comics, schoolin' and The End of the Fucking World with Spurgeon on The Comics Reporter<. "I really enjoyed building something with smaller bricks. I guess that's how I've always thought of comics, breaking it down into scenes. Even when I'm just doing one book. I also like to mix the bricks up a bit." . 
 
Wake Up, Percy Gloom!
 
• Review: The New York Journal of Books enjoys Wake Up, Percy Gloom by Cathy Malkasian. "In a graphic novel filled with exceptional art, lush dreamscapes and characters of rich beauty, Ms. Malkasian brings simple moments to life that show us the depth of someone's heart," writes Mark Squirek. "Wake Up, Percy Gloom reminds us that every single moment is important because at any second apples may bloom and fall from the sky."
 
• Review: iFanboy on Wake Up, Percy Gloomby Cathy Malkasian. "Malkasian decorates the tale with surreal and absurd dressing (reminiscent of the land of Oz, more than anything else), and plots with twists and turns that are almost impossible to anticipate....If L Frank Baum, Jim Henson and, Jeff Smith wrote a comic together, it would feel (and look) a bit like Percy Gloom," writes Josh Christie. 
 
• Review: The Comic Pusher looks at Wake Up, Percy Gloomby Cathy Malkasian. "Part cutting satire, part fairy tale, part nightmare…Wake Up, Percy Gloom! is another astonishing work from Malkasian, a beautiful and uplifting graphic novel filled with magic and loss and joy. Malkasian, a veteran animator and now highly accomplished cartoonist, once more delivers a work of startling power cementing herself as one of the most distinct and important voices in comics," pens Jeffrey  O. Gustafson.
 
• Commentary: Jessica Lee report on The Beat about Cathy Malkasian's talk at the California College of Arts. "The amount of precision and undeniable heart Cathy puts into every ounce of her characters, panel construction, and worldbuilding is commendable, filling WAKE UP PERCY GLOOM with the kind of rare wonder that make it a gem in the pool of graphic novels…" writes Lee.
 
 
• Review: Eye of the Majestic Creature Vol. 2 by Leslie Stein is reviewed on VICE. "What Leslie does with her work is special. She seems largely influenced by newspaper comics, but her stories are subtle.…The core of this series seems to be about how uncomfortable it is to interact with other people and how lonely it can be in New York," says Nick Gazin.
 
• Review: Eye of the Majestic Creature Vol. 2 by Leslie Stein on Comics Bulletin. "Leslie Stein is a voice for a certain aspect of her generation, the ones you see feigning ironic detachment while inside they are either all honest excitement or vast empathy. While it's just so much easier and cooler not to get emotionally involved, for people like Stein, that's just really not possible," writes Daniel Elkin. 
 
Good Dog
 
• Review: Good Dog by Graham Chaffee on Forbidden Planet International. "It's a brilliant little book, one I could quite cheerfully have read much more of, one that definitely left me wanting more…throughout the book, Chaffee paints the picture so vividly that you understand that dogs, just like us, are complicated beasts, and each has to find their own life," writes Richard Bruton.  
 
• Review: The Hooded Utilitarian reviews Good Dog by Graham Chaffee. "Chaffee largely eschews panels which are filled with multifarious meaning and intricate correlations, adopting congenial, unsensational storytelling, evoking time, place and character; the gentle rhythms of a nostalgia associated with the early to mid twentieth century…The central questions being tackled here appear to be those of belief, ideology, and faith. A tangential discussion of deist philosophy may not be out of the question as well," writes Ng Suat Tong.
 
• Plug: Drawn Words on Good Dog by Graham Chaffee. "Good Dog is absolutely one of the most interesting comics of the year…Ivan's struggle as a stray is parallel to everyday human interaction and quest for personal fulfillment, exploring animal psychology in the simplest way Chaffee can possibly explain, while simultaneously maintaining a strong grip of emotion," muses Kevin Cortez.
 
• Plug (audio): Good Dog by Graham Chaffee on Bullseye with Jesse Thorn 
 
The End   Katherine Whaley
 
• Review: The End by Anders Nilsen on The A.V. Club. "This is a book from comics' more avant-garde wing, and a premier example of how to make experimental work that still connects broadly, rather than coming across as self-indulgent vamping," writes Noel Murray. 

• Plug: New York 1 on The End\ by Anders Nilsen. "…this beautiful creation explores grief and life, unanswered questions and unquestioned thought," states Andrew Losowsky.  
 
• Interview: Alex Dueben of CBR interviews Kim Deitch on The Amazing, Enlightening and Absolutely True Adventures of Katherine Whaley, process and the inclusion of beavers. "Well, when you read around in old fiction there is a whole genre of stuff that you might categorize as "hollow earth" stories. You know, hidden teeming civilizations deep within the earth.…The almost human workaholic activities of beavers seemed like a potentially good fit to a story of that kind," answered Deitch.
 
• Plug: The "underground comix legend Kim Deitch returns with an epic graphic novel" writes Benn Ray on The Amazing, Enlightening and Absolutely True Adventures of Katherine Whaley at Largehearted Boy.
 
Lost Cat
 
• Review: The National Post reviews Lost Cat. "Jason is one of the few artists (or writers) who can make existential aches seem droll, but it makes the smiles being provoked feel as honest as the ones we get when standing across from someone who makes the world feel a little less lonely," muses David Barry.
 
• Review: Comics Alliance gives Jason's Lost Cat the whatfor! "If you're familiar with Jason's previous work, you know his mastery of minimalist storytelling is what drives his art. His anthropomorphic, near emotionless characters, along with his consistent four panel page layouts, are his signature," writes Joseph Hughes.
 
• Review: Comics Bulletin looks at Jason's Lost Cat. "In a way it asks us to consider what is more meaningful, actually connecting or the longing to connect in the first place…Jason is an artist of a high caliber and reading Lost Cat confirms this. He creates in isolation, ruminates about our inability to connect, and, by doing so, brings us together," writes Daniel Elkin.
 
• Plug: Lost Cat is on Publishers Weekly Picks of the Week. "A humorous PI story populated by animals takes a turn toward the absurd in the newest-and longest yet-graphic novel by Jason."
 
• Review (audio): Episode 19 of Comics For Grownups looks at Lost Cat.
 
Bread and Wine  
 
Review: iFanboy on Bread & Wine by Samuel Delany and Mia Wolff. "The book is short...but packs some serious punch. Lots of the credit can go to Mia Wolff, whose black-and-white pen work adds some serious grittiness to the story. The only thing I love more than a good love story is a good atypical love story, and Bread & Wine fits the bill nicely," writes Josh Christie. 
 
• Review: Bread & Wine by Samuel Delany and Mia Wolff on Sequential Tart<. "The story itself is intimate and at times awkward to read, which makes it feel very real and personal. Delany doesn't shy away from some of the less-appealing moments in the relationship...Bread & Wine is an unusual offering, and certainly won't be to everyone's taste, but it's certainly worth a read now that it's widely available and reasonably priced," writes Katie Frank.
 
• Review: Bread &Wine by Samuel Delany and Mia Wolff was reviewed on Comics Grinder. "This graphic novel, originally published in 1999, springs from a memoir and stands alone as engaging and insightful...For a book that promises an erotic tale, there are even more scenes that speak to the great divide between the two men which they will either struggle with or overcome," wrote Henry Chamberlain, Comics Grinder
 
• Plug: Bread & Wine by Samuel Delany and Mia Wolff on Largehearted Boy. "With Alan Moore contributing an introduction and Neil Gaiman and Junot Diaz (and Frank Miller in case that still means something to anyone) singing its praises, you know Bread & Wine has something special going on," says Benn from Atomic Books.
 
Hip Hop Family Tree   Black is the Color 
 
• Plug: Publishers Weekly on Hip Hop Family Tree by Ed Piskor. Maurice Boyer details the creative process: "each strip [is] a full week affair in which he spends a day of research and writing immersed in books, videos or interviews in search of inspiration for the week's strip. From there, he spends the rest of the week drawing his pages by hand and coloring them on the computer."
 
• Interview: Julia Gfrӧrer is interviewed on The Beat by Zainab Ahktar. "I like writing for a contemporary setting, but a contemporary mermaid story would be kind of a hard sell, it feels unpleasantly whimsical to me, so for that reason Black is the Color had to be set in the past." nbsp;
 
7 Miles a Second  In Case We Die
 
• Review: HIV+ on 7 Miles a Second by David Wojnarowicz, James Romberger and Marguerite Van Cook. "It can be difficult to remember in 2013, just how despised gays were and just how oblivious the rest of society seemed to the AIDS epidemic in those dark days.… But 7 Miles a Second captures the rage and impotence felt by thousands of young gay men who were suddenly faced with the brutal finality of death," writes Jacob Anderson-Minshall.
 
• Review: Hyperallergic on 7 Miles a Second by David Wojnarowicz, James Romberger and Marguerite Van Cook.. "Wojnarowicz…didn’t win the great game of life; they lost bitterly. To hear about those losses firsthand, to watch them unfold in words that essentially position us as front-row spectators, is devastating.…If there’s another theme in 7 Miles a Second, one that counteracts the weight of the body, it must be motion. Evident in both the form and content of the text, motion offers the promise of escape," writes Jillian Steinhauer.
 
• Commentary: MSN ran a story about the Sub Pop Silver Jubilee and the In Case We Die reading & signing by Danny Bland. "Bland read a passage about the first time the book's main character and his teenaged girlfriend shoot up - a degenerate scene redolent of hindsight romanticizing. Packed inside the bookstore, the audience roared approval. Only in Seattle." 
 
• Interview: The Weekings' Joe Daly (a different one!) interviews Danny Bland on In Case We Die and getting clean, "Well, the catalyst for me getting clean was the classic tale of running out of resources. I did drugs until I ran out of money, and friends to steal from, and eventually the criminal element that I became involved with became too hot." Read more about these adventures in In Case We Die!
 
Goddamn This War! Barnaby  
 
• Review: Forbidden Planet International on Jacques Tardi's Goddamn This War! "This is going straight into my own collection, and in my opinion every decent graphic novel collection needs some Tardi in it, he is one of the great masters of the medium," sums up Joe Gordon.
 
• Review:  The French Embassy outlines Goddamn This War! "Goddamn This War! shares with [It Was the War of the] Trenches its sustained sense of outrage, pitch-black gallows humor, and impeccably scrupulous historical exactitude."
 
• Review: Washington Post on Barnaby by Crockett Johnson. "A whole new generation now will have the opportunity to become acquainted with Johnson's influential creation...Liberals may love Barnaby, but there is no reason why conservatives and libertarians can't admire the beauty, simplicity, wittiness and intelligence of this groundbreaking strip, too," posits Michael Taube. 
 
• Review: Barnaby by Crockett Johnson reviewed by The A.V. Club<. "With Barnaby, Johnson combined low-impact serialized adventure with some gentle comedy based around the ways that adults and kids diverge in their perspectives. The result is a compulsively readable strip with a winningly off-kilter point-of-view-and a cultural treasure that's been long-overdue for this kind of prestige archival project..." posits Noel Murray.  
 
• Plug: Mental Floss on Barnaby by Crockett Johnson. "It mixed fantasy, satire and political commentary and its humor was often very subtle. So subtle that its popularity was limited compared to most strips of the day. Editors Eric Reynolds and Philip Nel have taken great pains to annotate many of the topical references that were made to help new readers appreciate what Barnaby's small but devoted readership enjoyed at the time," pens Rich Barrett.
 
Mickey Mouse Color Sunday   Pogo Vol. 2
  
• Review: Comics Worth Reading flips through Mickey Mouse Color Sundays by Floyd Gottfredson. "The lighter approach makes this book a better choice to share with your young ones. They should love the timeless highjinks of the mouse and his friends. And anyone can appreciate the skilled cartooning and astounding art, so well-done it almost seems to move on paper," writes Johanna Draper Carlson. 
 
• Review: Robot 6 on Mickey Mouse Color Sundays by Floyd Gottfredson. "What I really took away from this book, however, was Gottfredson's considerable (and very nuanced) compositional and storytelling skills...an entertaining read and still a thrill to see what Gottfredson work out and then master this longer styled-format. Disney fans - or just fans of solid, entertaining comics in general - won't be disappointed."  
 
• Review: The Complete Syndicated Pogo Vol.2 "Bona Fide Balderdash" by Walt Kelly receives a 5 outta 5 stars from Comics Bulletin. "The world of those delightful characters feels tremendously lavish and vivid. Kelly's strip came from an era of deep graphical inventiveness…This book is pure magic, suitable for both a fourth grade teacher and a fourth grader," muses Jason Sacks. 
 
Love and Rockets Companion   Prince Valiant 6 
 
• Review: Page 45 on Love and Rockets: The Companion edited by Marc Sobel and Kristy Valenti. "Best of all, however, are the interviews, so utterly addictive that I almost missed my review deadline…Editor Marc Sobel's interview with Los Bros Hernandez delivers some astonishing insights into the cycle of each story's conception, execution, then complete burned-out numbness in Jaime... and workaholic Gilbert's crippling self-doubt halfway through each chapter early on," states Stephen L. Holland.
 
• Review: Spectrum Culture enjoys Hal Foster's Prince Valiant 6: 1947-1948.  "Readers unfamiliar with the Prince Valiant strip owe it to themselves to take a look. The stories encapsulate the values of a simpler, less cynical time, and the illustrations are first-rate," writes David Maine.
 
• Fun: Amazing fan art by Tim Sievert  of Prince Valiant.    
 
• Interview (audio): Forbidden Planet talks to Jaime Hernandez on Love and Rockets, alternative comics and more. 
 
Love and Rockets: The Covers Maakies 
 
• Plug: Comics Alliance gets PUMPED for Love and Rockets: The Covers.
 
• Plug: An odd but fun article on Love and Rockets and baseball on The Good Phight. "It's odd, Jaime's stories in L&R, collected in the massive Locas collections, are kind of geek treasure troves. Clearly Jaime is influenced by punk and 80's alt California, but he's also really into superheroes, luchadores, and monster movies, so you get this weird melange of nostalgia for all of this old nerd culture."
 
• Plug: Gawker breaks down all the little chickeny parts in their way with Tony Millionaire's Green Eggs and Maakies
 
Wandering Son Vol. 4  
 
• Commentary: Deb Aoki reports on Best/Worst Manga Panel at SDCC 2013. Moto Hagio's The Heart of Thomas is listed as Best New Manga for Kids/Teens. Wandering Son by Shimura Takako is listed on Best Continuing Series for Kids/Teens. And finally Inio Asano's Nijigahara Holograph lands on the Most Anticipated New Manga list.
 
• Review: Wandering Son Vol. 4 is reviewed on Experiments in Manga. "As nostalgic as Wandering Son can be, the middle school years haven't been idealized in the series.…Wandering Son is more about characters than a linear plot, but the fourth volume is an important setup for what comes next in the series," says Ash Brown.
 
• Plug: The Heart of Thomas gets a shout out at OTAKU USA on Yaoi Day!  
 
Golden Age of Baseall    50 Girls 50 
 
• Review: School Library Journal looks at Willard Mullin's Golden Age of Baseball and how it is applicable in the classroom! "student sports fans (in this case, baseball fans specifically) can leverage their outside-of-school literacies to comprehend and appreciate the sophisticated cartoons and high-level text in Willard Mullin’s Golden Age of Baseball," says Peter Gutierrez.
 
• Plug: "…this Willard Mullin book has a lot of beautiful cartooning in it," states Tom Spurgeon of the Comics Reporter on Willard Mullin's Golden Age of Baseball.nbsp;
 
• Review: Full Stop is pleased with the Fantagraphics' EC Comics Library. "It's fitting that Fantagraphics - long-time champion of the rights and importance of comics creators, and re-issuer important historical comics - would arrange a publishing line this way. Even though it may not be surprising, it's still a commendable decision. It's also an important development in further establishing comics as art and literature worthy of serious consideration and study.… It presents work by EC’s most important artists, drawing the work from across all EC titles," states Sam Costello.
 
• Review: Comics Bulletin] >on 50 Girls 50 by Al Williamson. It "is an affordable means of acquiring a pleasingly complete collection of this seminal work by a seminal artist.
 
Barracuda in the Attic Old Castle's Secret  The Littlest Pirate King
 
• Plug: Boing Boing's Mark Frauenfelder comments on Barracuda in the Attic coming out soon by Kipp Friedman. "What a talented family!"   
 
• Plug: Boing Boing delights in The Littlest Pirate King by David B. "So, it's a little grim. But it's also gorgeous…If you liked the premise of Neil Gaiman's award-winning Graveyard Book, you're sure to love this, but be aware that it's much a darker and sadder story than Gaiman's. I think this is probably suited to kids eight or nine and up…" suggests Cory Doctorow.
 
• Review: Jason Sacks on the Comics Bulletin gives Donald Duck: The Old Castle's Secret by Carl Barks the run down. "This book is an absolutely delightful assortment of stories, a thoroughly charming, delightful collection of vivid stories full of clever wordplay and slapstick action…Barks tells the story in ways that have to delight any reader.The more I read of Barks's comics, the more I come to love them."
 
• Interview: Editor Mike Catron talks to Disney Dads on Babble about Carl Barks and the latest Donald Duck: The Old Castle's Secret
 
• Interview: Gil Roth of Chimera Obscura 1interviews both Michael Kupperman and Ivan Brunetti in this episode sure to make you guffaw.  
 
• Commentary: CBR's Corey Blake writes a very thorough report on the Kim Thompson Tribute panel at San Diego.  
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