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The Complete Peanuts 1993-1994 (Vol. 22)
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Walt Disney's Uncle Scrooge and Donald Duck: Return to Plain Awful (The Don Rosa Library Vol. 2) [U.S./CANADA ONLY - Pre-Order]
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Aces High (The EC Comics Library) [Pre-Order]
Aces High (The EC Comics Library) [Pre-Order]
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Category >> Drew Weing

Things to see: 9/29/10
Written by Mike Baehr | Filed under Wilfred SantiagoTony MillionaireThings to seeSteven WeissmanSteve BrodnerRoger LangridgeRichard SalaRenee FrenchRay FenwickPeanutsNoah Van SciverMarco CoronaMaakiesLaura ParkKevin HuizengaJordan CraneJoe KimballJim WoodringJim FloraJasonHans RickheitGabrielle BellDrew WeingDerek Van GiesonDebbie DrechslerDave CooperDash ShawDaniel ClowesAndrice ArpAnders Nilsen 28 Sep 2010 11:48 PM

Periodic clips & strips — click for improved/additional viewing and possible artist commentary at the sources:

Ibsen cover - Jason

Jason presents two cover illustrations: one for a biography of Henrik Ibsen, the other for a 1989 issue of a Norwegian fanzine (oh yeah, and the cover for his next Fanta collection What I Did is in there too)

I, Anonymous - Steven Weissman

Steven Weissman's latest "I, Anonymous" spot and some sketchbook pages here and here

Snoopy - Valerie Fletcher

Eightball 2 - Anthony Vukojevich

• A couple of witty recent entries on the Covered blog: Valerie Fletcher's version of The Complete Peanuts 1969-1970 and Anthony Vukojevich's take on Eightball #2

Dave Cooper

Dave Cooper gives a peek at a few of the 96 little drawings he's bringing on his West Coast book tour, with commentary

gut check - Jim Woodring

• An unpleasant new Jim Woodring panel

Jordan Crane

• The final part of Jordan Crane's "Chapter Two: Unraveling" at What Things Do

Dungeon - Drew Weing

• A bit of Dungeon fan art by Drew Weing 

"Greetings, stranger of the future. If you are reading this, it means the written word has survived, that the world of tomorrow still exists, and that for some reason my ramblings are still considered worth reading. My name is Mark Twain, and I write these words to you in the good old days of August 2010."

• A prose story from Michael Kupperman: "From the Newly Discovered Second Autobiography of Mark Twain"

Invisible Hands - Richard Sala

Richard Sala presents a whole bunch of production, concept, and storyboard art from his animated serial "Invisible Hands" from MTV's Liquid Television, in 4 installments (so far) here here here and here, with commentary

http://www.fantagraphics.com/images/flog/mike/201009/benemerenze%20di%20satana%2002%20150dpi.jpg

• "Benemerenze di satana" by Marco Corona 

Jim Flora

• A woodcut illustration of Cincinnati (1941), an uncompleted sketchbook drawing (circa 1950) and a magazine proposal sketch (1956), all at the Jim Flora blog (with commentary from Irwin Chusid)

black phoebe - Debbie Drechsler

• A black phoebe and some ground squirrels from Debbie Drechsler's nature sketchbook, with commentary

San Diego - Gabrielle Bell

• It's part 8 of Gabrielle Bell's "San Diego Comic-Con Comicumentary"

Elijah Lovejoy November 7 1837 - Noah Van Sciver

Noah Van Sciver's historical strip "Elijah Lovejoy November 7 1837" part 1 and part 2

Let's Do Piriformis Stretches!

Laura Park gets anatomical with a how-to and a note to her doctor

rodents - Renee French

• From Renee French: hairy girl, fly with stick, dog, Ikea roof, guys (photo), baby, rodents, thing roofs

Daily Drawing 20 - Dash Shaw

Dash Shaw's Daily Drawing nos. 15, 16, 17, 18, 19 & 20

Truman vs. Obama - Steve Brodner

• Recent Steve Brodner sketches, with commentary, of Dinesh d'Souza, cowardly Karl Rove, the corpse of Harry Truman giving Obama what-for, and Truman's bones revisited

creepy cave - Kevin Huizenga

• It looks like Kevin Huizenga is sending Glenn Ganges on some kind of Hardy Boys adventure or something

Ackroyd - Roger Langridge

• I didn't know that Roger Langridge had done rejected cover comps for our Jules Feiffer novel reprints (one of which got canceled anyway)

sketchbook - Anders Nilsen

• New sketchbook pages from Anders Nilsen 

http://www.fantagraphics.com/images/flog/mike/201009/page43.jpg

Hans Rickheit's Ectopiary page 43; Hans also has a song for you

Enough Astronaut Blood to Last the Winter - cover - Derek Van Gieson

The cover to Derek Van Gieson's evocatively titled upcoming publication

Cluster of Tigers

• Tigers clustered and solo by Andrice Arp for an old Giant Robot art show

Process

• From Wilfred Santiago, page 91 of 21, plus process images for pages 120 & 121, and a postcard illustration

Maakies - Tony Millionaire

Two weeks worth of Tony Millionaire's Maakies

Work in progress (presumably) by Joe Kimball

Spots for Cottage Life Magazine

Recent spot illos by Ray Fenwick for Cottage Life Magazine

Daily OCD: 9/24/10
Written by Mike Baehr | Filed under Steven BrowerStephen DeStefanoreviewsRand HolmesPatrick RosenkranzMoto HagioMort MeskinmangaLove and RocketsLos Bros HernandezKim DeitchJim WoodringJaime HernandezGilbert HernandezFour Color FearDrew WeingDrew FriedmanDaily OCDComing AttractionsCatalog No 439Al Jaffee 24 Sep 2010 6:32 PM

Today's Online Commentary & Diversions:

Set to Sea

Review: "We are witness to a man's life unfolding, unraveling, before us in a series of postcards that leave nothing — or is it everything? — to the imagination. I don't know Drew Weing, or whether he's lucky or good, but in Set to Sea , he has reminded me once again just how much story you can share in a brief flurry of comic panels, so long as you know how to trim the sails and catch the wind." – Steve Duin, The Oregonian

Review: "...Set to Sea... is so much more than a hauntingly inspiring story about a poet who ends up on a sea vessel. It is so much more than page after page of highly-detailed illustrations. It feels like a small precious art book full of engravings or paintings on each page or an old illustrated maritime novel. [...] Weing’s art is mesmerizing. You could stare at one page for hours. Each page is carefully planned and crafted to maximize its storytelling ability and it is easy to see the love and effort that went into each line and crosshatch." – Shawn Daughhetee, The HeroesOnline Blog

Review: "The pages [of Set to Sea] are incredibly expressive, able to convey longing, panic, rage, camaraderie, mourning, and ultimately peace. Weing manipulates whole compositions to achieve these effects, not merely the expressions on characters’ faces." – Joshua Malbin

Review: "Drew [Weing] uses the possibilities of the medium to perfection [in Set to Sea], telling the life story of the guy page by page, somehow pulling the impression of a richly lived life through scattered moments." – Kevin Bramer, Optical Sloth

Lucky in Love Book 1: A Poor Man's History [with FREE Signed Bookplate]

Review: "Imagine Sad Sack stepping out of his cartoon world and into ours — warts and all — and that’s what Lucky in Love almost feels like. [...] The real star of the show here is artist DeStefano, who mixes up this 1940s world as one-part humor strip outrageousness, and one-part gorgeous Will Eisner-style dramatic noir — a real visual tour de force." – John Seven, Worcester Magazine

A Drunken  Dream and Other Stories [Pre-Order]

Review: "Revealed in these pages [of A Drunken Dream and Other Stories] are gentle but dark stories that are preoccupied with the loss and alienation that their intended audiences no doubt feel, often without any tangible reasons beyond the purely psychological. Several stories stand out for cherry pickers, but you’ll be rewarded by each entry." – John Mitchell, North Adams Transcript

Review: At The Hooded Utilitarian, Noah Berlatsky examines (and spoils) the first four stories in A Drunken Dream in his own inimitable fashion

The Artist Himself: A Rand Holmes Retrospective [Pre-Order]

Review: "...The Artist Himself... present[s] a compellingly fresh... approach to the history of the medium... What makes The Artist Himself unique is in the title itself — Rosenkranz has constructed a sprawling portrait of Rand Holmes as a man in conflict with the 'the artist himself' — a man trying to carve out a way to live that allowed for art (never an easy feat) and an art that somehow made sense in his life. ...[A]side from the obvious benefits of learning about Holmes, I found myself selfishly drawing tremendous inspiration from Rosenkranz as he demonstrated the richness possible in writing the history of comics. He draws the curtain back as if to say, 'see, here’s someone you hardly think of, who lived an extraordinary life, and it’s a life that must be reckoned within the history.' It radically broadens what we think of as a cartoonist’s life, and in that Rosenkranz has given us a great gift." – Dan Nadel, Comics Comics

Love and Rockets: New Stories #3 [with FREE Signed Bookplate]

Review: "If Love and Rockets: New Stories #3 only contained Gilbert Hernandez’s 36-page 'Scarlet By Starlight,' it would still be one of the most significant new comics of the year. [...Jaime's] 'The Love Bunglers' and 'Browntown' offer the kind of rich, intricate stories — packed with sharp observations about human desire and self-justification — that only an author with 30 years of experience with these characters could write. But readers don’t need to have read all the previous Maggie tales to follow them. Everything a newcomer needs to know is woven neatly into the stories themselves... There are acclaimed filmmakers and novelists who can’t do what Jaime Hernandez does — or Gilbert, for that matter. When the two of them are at their most inspired, as they are here, they make almost every other comics creator today look like a fumbling hack. [Grade] A" – The A.V. Club

Review: "I won't pretend to have a clue as to what Beto's trying to do with this stuff; sometimes he seems to be paying tribute of sorts to junk cinema and/or comment on the current state of the movies, and sometimes it seems like he just wants to draw to naked dudes beating a cop to death with a rock. ...Jaime is note-perfect throughout, using every nuance and trick at his command to engage and move the reader. It's a masterwork, and I'll be damned if I can tell what he'll do for an encore. ...[T]his one brings the goods. If you care at all about this series and those characters, you'll want to get this [issue of Love and Rockets: New Stories]..." – Johnny Bacardi, Popdose

Review: "...[T]his one is really damn good, with a typically surreal and horrifying story from Gilbert and an excellent bit of character work from Jaime. Isn't it awesome that stuff on this level is what we've come to expect? [...] Yes, it's another great issue of one of the best comics series of all time; what else is new? Jaime and Gilbert are rightfully revered as all-time great creators, but the fact that they are still pumping out incredible work and bettering themselves, sure to keep doing it for as long as possible, should make readers celebrate their wealth and fortune. Even if everybody else quit, we would still be pretty lucky. Long live Love and Rockets!" – Matthew J. Brady, Warren Peace Sings the Blues

Review: "You open a Xaime story, you know what you’re gonna get. He’s a known quantity/quality on the richest level... With Xaime, you’re going to get a perfectly-told Locas story: clean... and humanistic and relatable, funny, sad, the whole package. Beto, on the other hand …. His shit is scary creative, and sometimes just scary. Gilbert is the higher mathematics, you know what I’m saying? Ever since 'Human Diastrophism' I haven’t felt safe in his company, haven’t trusted that crazy bastard. Because he will do some fucked-up shit when you least expect it. [...] So, boom, right on Jump Street of Love and Rockets: New Stories #3 there’s a Gilbert story. Deep breath. Okay. In we go with gun and flashlight." – Rob Gonsalves, Rob's Comics Zone

Four Color Fear: Forgotten Horror Comics of the 1950s [Pre-Order]

Review: "The colors are garish, the stories grotesque, and the art much freakier than the norm. Where EC’s comics are more akin to the drive-in fodder of American International Pictures, the comics in Four Color Fear are the equivalent of a David F. Friedman grindhouse roughie: lurid, exploitative, and just plain wrong. In short, this book is awesome. Making it even more awesome is Sadowski’s annotation: ...the layer of scholarship is enough to make reading about decaying zombies and devil-worshippers seem almost ennobling. [Grade] A-" – The A.V. Club

Too Soon? Famous/Infamous Faces 1995-2010 [Pre-Order]

Review: "Caricature is a bit of a dying art, but there’s still a place for it, especially in a celebrity-obsessed culture like ours that goes out of its way to make its idols look even better than they already do. That’s why we need Drew Friedman, whose precise, pointillist style has been putting the rich and famous to the sword for decades. His new collection, Too Soon?: Famous/Infamous Faces 1995-2010, features another round of his inimitable caricatures, which manage to make everyone from venal creeps to well-meaning politicians look alternately hideous and noble. Friedman is still at the top of his game... [Grade] B+" – The A.V. Club

From Shadow to Light: The Life & Art of Mort Meskin [Pre-Order]

Review: "One of the lesser-known lights of the Golden Age, illustrator Mort Meskin was a prolific workhorse whose angular, action-packed style and use of deep shadow effects would prove a huge influence on Steve Ditko. From Shadow to Light: The Life and Art of Mort Meskin, a new biography of Meskin compiling exhaustive interviews with his peers and extensive cooperation from his sons, doesn’t lack for material. It also has plenty of great anecdotes, and through quality reproductions, it skillfully makes its case that its subject was a very talented artist. [Grade] B-" – The A.V. Club

Catalog No. 439: Burlesque  Paraphernalia and Side Degree Specialties and Costumes

Review: "The 1930 DeMoulin Bros. catalog, or Catalog No. 439: Burlesque Paraphernalia and Side Degree Specialties and Costumes, ...reached the jester of a more or less pronounced sadistic orientation, and offered them the tools and effects that made it possible to fool friends (?) to put their heart in their throat and give them pain here and there. Fantagraphics Books has recently reprinted the directory again (along with several essays that comment on product selection in a cultural perspective)... Although one might prefer to avoid being exposed to the tricks that comprise the DeMoulin catalog, I must admit that I laughed both three and five times when I looked through the offerings. Most of us probably have a little sadist in us, I guess." – Kjetil Johansen, Nekropolis – Den Historiske Bloggen (translated from Norwegian)

Weathercraft

Plugs: "Well, in our rambunctious endeavour to keep up with the literary radness of the Northwest, we... want to point you toward [Jim] Woodring’s newest graphic novel, Weathercraft, which is out now from Seattle-based publisher Fantagraphic Books. In addition to Weathercraft, we personally recommend their series Love and Rockets, from Los Bros Hernandez. If you’re looking for some reading that really is graphic, like super sexy female bodies comin at ya with homoerotic undertones that are never unleashed but still drive you crazy, you’ll want to pick up Love and Rockets. This series is an endlessly delicious ride through the relationships of men and women in crappy southern California neighborhoods." – Lori Huskey, Dark Sky Magazine

The Complete Peanuts 1977-1978 (Vol. 14) [NORTH AMERICA ONLY]

List: Graphic Novel Reporter's "Fall Graphic Novels List: Essential Reading for the Season" includes The Complete Peanuts 1977-1978 by Charles M. Schulz, A Drunken Dream and Other Stories by Moto Hagio, Unlovable: The Complete Collecton by Esther Pearl Watson, Fire & Water: Bill Everett, the Sub-Mariner and the Birth of Marvel Comics by Blake Bell, From Shadow to Light: The Life & Art of Mort Meskin by Steven Brower, You'll Never Know, Book Two: Collateral Damage by C. Tyler, Love and Rockets: New Stories 3 by the Hernandez Bros., Prison Pit: Book 2 by Johnny Ryan, The Sanctuary by Nate Neal, Zippy: Ding Dong Daddy from Dingburg by Bill Griffith, The Extraordinary Adventures of Adèle Blanc-Sec Vol. 1 by Jacques Tardi, Bent by Dave Cooper, Mome Vol. 20, Forlorn Funnies Vol. 1 by Paul Hornschemeier,  and Unexplored Worlds: The Steve Ditko Archives, Vol. 2

The Search for Smilin' Ed!

Profile: Robot 6 presents a "Comics College" introductory guide to the work of Kim Deitch, written by Deitch Universe expert Bill Kartalopoulos: "Kim Deitch is an enormously vital and prolific cartoonist who was also one of the charter members of the underground comix scene that changed comics in the 1960s and 70s. [...] More than forty years later, Deitch stands as one of the few underground cartoonists who has steadily and consistently produced a large body of important work, spanning every available format from the alternative weekly comic strip to the graphic novel."

Humbug

Interview: Al Jaffee touches briefly on his Humbug days in this extensive Q&A with Mother Jones's Michael Mechanic: "I loved Harvey [Kurtzman] and I miss him to this day. He was a very, very inspiring guy. He was inventive and inspiring and he also was just a scrupulous editor. He could catch things that most people would just say, 'Let it go through, it really doesn't matter; who's going to know?' But once Harvey pointed it out, I would change it even if it took me the whole day. Harvey knew how to make things work because he wasn't greedy, he wasn't successful." (Via ¡Journalista!)

Oxford American comics redux
Written by Mike Baehr | Filed under Michael KuppermanJosh SimmonsDrew WeingDame Darcy 13 Sep 2010 10:51 PM

Oxford American issue 70

In response to my previous Flog post Eric plopped the new issue of the Oxford American onto my desk yesterday morning and not only does it include comics and illustrations by Drew Weing and Josh Simmons as previously reported, it also has Dame Darcy, Michael Kupperman, Eric Haven, Josh Neufeld, Jeremy Tinder and other, less-familiar talents. Let's hear it for comics in lit mags!

Comics in the new Oxford American
Written by Mike Baehr | Filed under Josh SimmonsDrew Weing 12 Sep 2010 7:23 PM

Oxford American issue 70

We mentioned this in passing in the last Things to See, but it bears noting on its own: the new issue of the Oxford American includes comics stories by Drew Weing and Josh Simmons — and that's just what we know of. Who else might be in the issue? Pick up a copy and find out — and then tell us, we'd love to know...

Things to see: 9/10/10
Written by Mike Baehr | Filed under Tim LaneThings to seeSteven WeissmanSteve BrodnerSergio PonchioneRobert GoodinRenee FrenchPaul HornschemeierMiss Lasko-GrossMatthias LehmannMark KalesnikoLaura ParkKevin HuizengaJosh SimmonsJohn HankiewiczJim FloraJasonHans RickheitGabrielle BellDrew WeingDrew FriedmanDerek Van GiesonDebbie DrechslerDash ShawDame DarcyAl Columbia 10 Sep 2010 6:26 PM

Periodic clips & strips — click for improved/additional viewing and possible artist commentary at the sources:

reality TV/music stars - Drew Friedman

Drew Friedman illustrates the latest crop of pop stars-cum-reality TV stars for Billboard (with commentary)

Henni - Miss Lasko-Gross

• The cover of a new minicomic Miss Lasko-Gross is debuting at SPX (via Facebook)

Amazing Facts and Beyond! - Kevin Huizenga

• From Kevin Huizenga, a new Amazing Facts and Beyond with Leon Beyond strip

work in progress - Matthias Lehmann

Two more stages in Matthias Lehmann's scratchboard work in progress

hobos - Jason

• From Jason: a 1996 anthology story page; a lizard lady; an illustration of U2; and three early cartoons

Hole - Steven Weissman

Steven Weissman drew Courtney Love for The Stranger's Bumbershoot guide; also, "I, Anonymous" (original, as printed), and ice cream roundup

panels - John Hankiewicz

Two more panels from an upcoming comic by John Hankiewicz 

Prim & Fancy - Jeffrey Meyer

New Mutants #33 - Derek Van Gieson

• Two good ones at the Covered blog: Jeffrey Meyer does Al Columbia's Pim & Francie and Derek Van Gieson does New Mutants #33

Gomorrah - Robert Goodin

• Relatedly, at his Wood Paneled Basement blog Robert Goodin says "The Criterion Collection curated a film festival for this year's All Tomorrow's Parties in New York. Comic artists were asked to create posters for the different movies and I did the one above for Gomorrah."

Lupine Nihilist - Dame Darcy

• Original art, crafts and other good stuff in Dame Darcy's latest blog update

future - Drew Weing

Drew Weing posts this snippet of a comic story he has in the current issue of the Oxford American; Josh Simmons posts an even less revealing bit of his strip from the same issue

Belligerent Piano - Tim Lane

• The latest installment of Tim Lane's Belligerent Piano

Pink & Black Cats - Jim Flora

• At the Jim Flora art blog: a 1960 tempera sketch, 1991 sketchbook & journal pages

squirrel - Debbie Drechsler

Debbie Drechsler sketches squirrels and other fauna, plus a heron

San Diego - Gabrielle Bell

Gabrielle Bell's San Diego adventures continue in part 6 of her Comic-Con Comicumentary

Pacer - Mark Kalesniko

Mark Kalesniko's AMC Pacer reference sketches for Freeway move to the interior

Riunione di Condominio - Sergio Ponchione

Sergio Ponchione presents "Riunione di Condominio" ("Condo Meeting") from the new issue of Linus

Monsieur le Moon - Paul Hornschemeier

Paul Hornschemeier's latest t-shirt design for his Forlorn Funnies Shirt Shop

Lucky

Another heartrending Lewis strip from Laura Park 

Repetition - Josh Simmons

Josh Simmons presents his strip from Bound & Gagged; also, "Quacker Alley" isn't credited to Josh but it sure looks like one of his

bunnytwine - Renee French

• From Renee French: scrote face girl, Barry the bird swimming, bunny with twine, a popsicle, and a series of shadowy things

daily drawing 7 - Dash Shaw

Dash Shaw's Daily Drawing nos. 3, 4, 5, 6, & 7, plus his animated sitcom pitch — I'd watch it

Paul Conrad - Steve Brodner

Steve Brodner takes on a hero and a villain: Paul Conrad and Pastor Terry Jones respectively

Ectopiary page 40 - Hans Rickheit

Hans Rickheit's Ectopiary page 40 — our Dutch-speaking readers may be interested to know that Ectopiary is being translated and serialized at Serieland

Daily OCD: 9/7/10
Written by Mike Baehr | Filed under Tony MillionaireTim KreiderStephen DeStefanoreviewsMoto HagiomangaJosh SimmonsJim WoodringJasonhooray for HollywoodDrew WeingDash ShawDan DeCarloDaily OCDCarol Tyler 7 Sep 2010 5:38 PM

Online Commentary & Diversions returns from the U.S. holiday:

A Drunken  Dream and Other Stories [Pre-Order]

List: About.com: Manga places Moto Hagio's A Drunken Dream and Other Stories at #19 on their list of "50 Essential Manga for Libraries": "Collected for the first time in a gorgeous hardcover edition, A Drunken Dream offers a rare glimpse into the work of one of Japan's most distinctive and influential creators in shojo manga, and heck, manga, period. Worth recommending to both older teen and adult readers alike."

Review: "Hagio draws these stories as if a full symphonic score were playing in the background. Her delicate, razor-thin pen line expertly captures her characters’ wide-eyed, open-mouthed anguish effectively. [...]  I, certainly, am very glad that Fantagraphics made the effort (and judging by the exceptional production values it was a tremendous effort) to get this book out there ...because... beyond Hagio’s historical significance, [A] Drunken Dream [and Other Stories] is a book that deserves attention." – Chris Mautner, Robot 6

Review: "Ever since it was announced in March (was it really that long ago?), I’d been looking forward to reading [A Drunken Dream and Other Stories] by legendary Moto Hagio. [...] It would be a real shame if Fantagraphics didn’t get any supportive business from this collection and demand for more. [...] I’m looking forward to reading more, and adding to the crying list!" – Sunday Comics Debt (who also provides the following two links)

Review: "BUY. THIS. BOOK. No, seriously, buy it now. [...] I don’t think there is a single thing wrong with this book; Hagio-sensei touches on each of the topics she chooses to use with such perfection and …delicacy? that you can’t help but be amazed at how she does it. [...] I can’t wait for the next volume of manga Fantagraphics chooses to put out! They did a beyond amazing job with [A Drunken Dream and Other Stories]." – Kelakagandy's Ramblings

Plug: "This week... everything fades in the presence of a newly-released collection of short manga from shojo pioneer Moto Hagio, A Drunken Dream and Other Stories. [...] Simply put, this book is gorgeous. [...] This is a release I’ve been eagerly anticipating since its announcement. Visit your local bookstore to find out why." – Melinda Beasi, Manga Bookshelf

You'll Never Know Book 2: Collateral Damage [Pre-Order]

Review: "'Greatest Generation' hoopla will never seem the same after You’ll Never Know: Collateral Damage, book two in Carol Tyler’s sprightly but relentlessly honest 'graphic memoir'... [T]his is the story of not just a family but a generation, or two or three. And all are told with a saving dash of humor. Tyler’s form, a mix of scrapbook, diary, and cartoon panels, is likewise messy and eccentric, but it pays off in layered textures and viewpoints. Two famous precedents, Art Spiegelman’s Maus and Marjane Satrapi’s Persepolis, seem almost one-dimensional by comparison." – Eric Scigliano, Seattle Met

Set to Sea

Review: "While there aren’t necessarily many surprises in the story, Set to Sea is more about the savoring of a series of vivid moments (both for the lead character and the reader) than any sort of narrative complexity. With each page acting as a single panel, the true joy of reading Set to Sea is luxuriating in Weing’s intense crosshatching and detail. [...] Indeed, in a book whose visuals have such a powerful impact, Weing’s decision not to overwrite (and especially not to over-narrate) was his wisest. With nearly 70 of the book’s pages appearing as silent, the result was a book that understood and maximized its charms." – Rob Clough, The Comics Journal

Interview: Nicola D'Agostino presents the original English text of the Drew Weing interview which ran at Comicsblog.it so you don't have to struggle through the mangled autotranslation: "So one day in 2005, I drew a panel with a guy sleeping. The only thing I knew about him was that he was a big fellow. I spent more than a year adding to it bit by bit, just improvising panels as I went. I started Set to Sea with no idea that it would be set in the past, or even set on the sea, so to speak!"

Billy Hazelnuts and the Crazy Bird

Review: "...[T]he Billy Hazelnuts books are safe for children, while still being unique and complex enough for adults. Here Millionaire combines a gung-ho adventure spirit with a tempered yet still present darkness — two strains that have been the keys to so much of the greatest children’s literature. [...] Tony Millionaire is a genius and the Billy Hazelnuts books may be his best work. Imagine if Beatrix Potter had dropped acid with the 60s underground comix crowd or if A.A. Milne had collaborated with Franz Kafka. If you love fun, hilarious, and plain weird stories, then Billy Hazelnuts is for you." – Lincoln Michel, The Faster Times

Lucky in Love Book 1: A Poor Man's History [with FREE Signed Bookplate]

Plug: Comix 411's Tom Mason plugs the Stephen DeStefano retrospective exhibit at mdh Gallery next week: "It’s a cartoon fan’s dream come true, and did I mention the wine?"

The Pin-Up Art of Dan DeCarlo

Profile/Preview: A gallery of images from the book accompanies this article: "See the work of Dan DeCarlo in the book The Pin-Up Art of Dan DeCarlo, published by Fantagraphics, which plunges into an alternate universe where Betty, Veronica, Sabrina grew up and live out situations that summed up the lewd sexual desire of men in the time before the sexual revolution of the twentieth century." – Ambrosia (translated from Portuguese)

I Killed Adolf Hitler

Interview: At his Cats Without Dogs blog, Jason presents a brief Q&A he recently did with the Spanish newspaper El Periodico de Catalunya: "I can hear the voice of a woman, from somewhere above me. 'Don't cry,' her voice says. 'One day you will see Neal Adams at a comic book convention in America.'"

Weathercraft

Feature: USA Today Pop Candy's Whitney Matheson spotlights Jim Woodring and his giant pen project: "I can't wait to see the pen and the drawings! (Also, can we start a campaign to get a live demonstration in New York?)"

House [with FREE Signed Bookplate]

Commentary: At The Hooded Utilitarian, Ng Suat Tong surveys the use of buildings in comics and then looks specifically at architecture in Josh Simmons’s House 

Commentary: At The Comics Journal, Tim Kreider's requiem for Cathy

Commentary: The Comics Journal's Kristy Valenti is the guest contributor to this week's "What Are You Reading?" column at Robot 6

Bottomless Belly Button [with FREE Signed Bookplate]

Hooray for Hollywood: At Publishers Weekly's PWxyz blog Rachel Deahl reports that Dash Shaw's Bottomless Belly Button can be seen being read by one of the protagonists of the new film The Freebie

Daily OCD: 8/31/10
Written by Mike Baehr | Filed under reviewsRand HolmesPeanutsPatrick RosenkranzMoto HagioMichael KuppermanmangaLinda MedleyJim WoodringJasonDrew WeingDaily OCDCharles M Schulz 31 Aug 2010 5:11 PM

Online Commentary & Diversions:

A Drunken  Dream and Other Stories [Pre-Order]

Review: "It's hard not to get swept away your first time reading this book through. The gentle tug of the stories' allure that keeps you reading is hard to ignore so it's recommended you give in. Read it all the way through at your own pace. Once you're done, wait a few days or a couple weeks even, and then read it again. A Drunken Dream and Other Stories is a collection of subtleties as much as it is one of short stories. While the plots themselves are straight-forward enough (taking to mind how strange some can be), the emotional tone of each individual experience is where these stories truly pack a memorable punch. [...] Inside and out, Moto Hagio's A Drunken Dream and Other Stories is a mature collection of stories that aims to provoke thought and feeling and succeeds endearingly at just that. A piece of manga history that only becomes more engaging with each subsequent read, A Drunken Dream presents a great opportunity to experience the charms, both subtle and poignant, of Moto Hagio's craft." – Lissa Pattillo, Anime News Network

Review: "While reading A Drunken Dream and Other Stories, it felt like I was not so much reading the stories as getting submerged in pure book, and rather than try to explain why that is, I just feel the need to force everyone I know to buy it while making vaguely incoherent happy cries. [...]  It is a dazzling treat, and will mesmerize you. [...] If this doesn't win some awards it will be a travesty. Wholeheartedly recommended." – Sean Gaffney, A Case Suitable for Treatment

Tweet of the Week: "Best story in Drunken Dream is the antisocial girl/puppy one, though it's missing the last page where Mr. A kicks the shit out of everybody." – Joe "@snubpollard" McCulloch

The Artist Himself: A Rand Holmes Retrospective [Pre-Order]

Review: "...[T]his superb retrospective compilation and biography [The Artist Himself: A Rand Holmes Retrospective] featur[es] scads of sketches, reproductions of drawings, cartoons and the paintings he created in his later life..., preserved with a copious collection of his wickedly wonderful underground and alternative comic strips for fans and soon to be devotees. [...] Rand Holmes was a true artist in every sense of the world and mostly produced work intended to change society, not fill his pockets. This book is a wonderful tribute and one any grown-up art lover will marvel at and cherish." – Win Wiacek, Now Read This!

Low Moon

Review: "As usual with Jason, these stories [in Low Moon ] are blackly funny, with characters whose core motivations are often unknown. [...] He's been a creator of great stories for many years, but there has always been something glancing and surface-y about his works before. Jason has always been deadpan, but he's showing, some of the time, unexpected depths in that pan." – Andrew Wheeler, The Antick Musings of G.B.H. Hornswoggler, Gent.

Weathercraft

Review: "There are books that can be easily reviewed — they have straightforward plots that either make sense or don't, characters whose motives are explicable and definable, and settings that relate to places in the real world. And then there are the works of Jim Woodring, where nothing is explained, nothing is stable, and nothing is like anyone else's work. And it's absolutely goddamn genius. [...] There is no one like Jim Woodring, and comics are immeasurably strengthened by the fact that he's chosen this art-form to work in. [...] If you have any feeling in your soul, Weathercraft will confuse and mesmerize you." – Andrew Wheeler, The Antick Musings of G.B.H. Hornswoggler, Gent.

The Complete Peanuts 1975-1976 (Vol. 13) [NORTH AMERICA ONLY]

Plug: "At the age of seven (right on schedule!) Dylan has discovered Charles Schulz, and has polished off my entire collection of The Complete Peanuts hardcovers, from 1950 to 1976. As a result, by my math, he has read nearly 9,500 daily and Sunday strips. Most published before I was born, let alone before he was born." – Ken Jennings

Tales Designed to Thrizzle #6

Plug (no pun intened): "Michael Kupperman is a funny guy, and pretty weird. His Tales Designed to Thrizzle carries on the madness... This one, however, rises to new heights with its appreciation of DRAINAGE!" – Lichanos, Journey to Perplexity

Set to Sea

Plug: "Drew Weing has finished his nautical adventure Set to Sea, bringing the story neatly back around in a circle. Told in a series of beautifully drawn single panels, Weing’s comic is the story of a sea-loving poet who gets shanghaied and learns the real thing is rougher and yet more beautiful than he had imagined. Fantagraphics has published a lovely print volume, and Weing is selling the original panels as well." – Brigid Alverson, Robot 6

Interview: Our Italophone readers (or readers with the patience to work through a slightly jumbled autotranslation) will want to check out Comicsblog.it's interview with Set to Sea creator Drew Weing 

Castle Waiting Vol. 2 - Linda Medley

Coming Attractions: "It seems like it’s been forever since the gorgeous hardcover collection of the first set of Linda Medley's Castle Waiting stories. Fantagraphics will release 384 more pages of charming comics about the family-of-choice residents of a falling-down castle along the way." – David Welsh, The Manga Curmudgeon

The Complete Peanuts 1977-1978 (Vol. 14) [NORTH AMERICA ONLY]

Analysis: Looking at the introduction of Helicopter Snoopy in The Complete Peanuts 1977-1978, Mike Sterling recalls when "I began to realize Peanuts was getting a little strange..."

Set to Sea original art for sale
Written by Mike Baehr | Filed under Original ArtDrew Weing 31 Aug 2010 9:34 AM

Set to Sea - Drew Weing

Drew Weing is offering every panel from his new graphic novel Set to Sea for sale on his website for a very reasonable $145 each. Get your favorite page before it's gone!

Daily OCD: 8/30/10
Written by Mike Baehr | Filed under Steve DitkoStephen DeStefanoRobert PollardreviewsPeanutsMichael KuppermanKrazy KatHo Che AndersonGeorge HerrimanDrew WeingDrew FriedmanDaily OCDCharles M SchulzCatalog No 439Blake BellBill Everett 30 Aug 2010 4:52 PM

Today's Online Commentary & Diversions will spill over into tomorrow because I have to take off to see John Porcellino & Noah Van Sciver...

Catalog No. 439: Burlesque  Paraphernalia and Side Degree Specialties and Costumes

Review: "Oh, the things men do to torture themselves. [Catalog No. 439:] Burlesque Paraphernalia and Side Degree Specialties and Costumes is an amazing flashback to a time before the Internet, television, radio, movies and pretty much every other form of entertainment. [...] This book is chock full of some of the funniest and most sadistic devices ever dreamed up by the human mind. It’s almost as if the guy from the Saw movies had wanted to get laughs instead of frights — and fans of current outrage cinema may be happily startled to find something actually called 'The Human Centipede' in its pages." – Siobhan Greene, Fangoria

The Complete Peanuts 1977-1978 (Vol. 14) [NORTH AMERICA ONLY]

Review: "Peppermint Patty is the cover girl for the latest volume of Charles Schulz’ classic [The Complete Peanuts], a fitting designation for an era that saw her emerge as one of the three most important characters of the strip. [...] It’s amazing that nearly thirty years into the strip, Schulz was still trying new things and finding new inspiration from old characters." – Rob Clough, The Comics Journal

Set to Sea

Review: "It's an odd little notion, the idea that you've lived a better, fuller life for having killed people. That's probably a somewhat unfair aspect of Drew Weing's good-natured, lushly drawn storybook (that's the term the comic practically demands I use) Set to Sea — a tale of a big lummox of a poet whose lackluster verses about life on the open sea are given new verve when he's shanghai'd into service on an actual ship — for me to seize on. After all, Weing's bigfooted style and inviting rather than intimidating illustrative chops place him squarely in the adventure-comics tradition of Carl Barks and Jeff Smith." – Sean T. Collins, Attentiondeficitdisorderly

Sand & Fury: A Scream Queen Adventure

Review: "Freed from the burden of making a 'serious' work, Anderson delves into some grim and gritty pulp material, and you can feel his relish and delight coming off the page. [Sand & Fury: A Scream Queen Adventure] basically deals with the story of a murdered woman who comes back from the dead as a banshee and eventually seeks revenge against her killer, who in turn may be a supernatural demon himself. It sounds like a Jim Balent comic, but Anderson creates a lovely noir atmosphere here, full of blood, sex and other nasty goings-on that never once becomes camp. It’s a nice, effective little horror comic." – Chris Mautner, Robot 6

Lucky in Love Book 1: A Poor Man's History

Plug: The Venture Bros. co-creator Jackson Publick writes: "Venture alumnus, super-pal and yiddish-loving Italian-American Stephen DeStefano premiered his new graphic novel, Lucky in Love at the San Diego Comic Con, and I was fortunate enough to snag a copy. Now it's your turn. Go buy one."

Tales Designed to Thrizzle - Thoroughly Thrizzled Pack

Interview: Graphic NYC 's Christopher Irving talks to Michael Kupperman. Irving on Tales Designed to Thrizzle: "Toss comic book art from the '40s and '50s into a blender with the dirty brand of humor that runs rampant in underground comics, and give it the pacing and spontaneity of skit comedy, and you get Kupperman’s distinctive Tales Designed to Thrizzle. Kupperman’s slick art has the polish and stiffness of old advertising art, creating a posed disconnect that adds a layer of absurdism to his offbeat stories." Sample Kupperman quote: "What I’m doing is more along the lines of sketch comedy. I grew up with Monty Python and SCTV, and those shows had a profound influence on me, through the writing and tone. My comic is humor for childish adults. I think I’m actually going to start putting that on the cover. It’s stuff that makes me laugh and part of my working method is to make stuff that will make others laugh as well."

Krazy & Ignatz 1916-1918: Love in a Kestle or Love in a Hut

Profile: "One hundred-plus years after the newspaper comic strip was born in San Francisco, a reader might well ask: Who was the greatest comic artist of all time? Some scholars say the question was settled in 1924 by New York arts critic Gilbert Seldes, whose book on the American cultural scene, The 7 Lively Arts, devoted an entire chapter to a reclusive cartoonist in the Hollywood Hills named George Herriman and his avant-garde comic strip, Krazy Kat." – Anthony Mostrom, The Los Angeles Times (via The Comics Reporter)

Town of Mirrors: The Reassembled Imagery of Robert Pollard

Profile: Katharine Zarrella of Interview magazine talks to Robert Pollard about his collage art and current exhibit thereof in New York City: "A handful of ex-bandmates are on Pollard's guest list, but what do they think of his artwork? 'It seems a lot of them dig it. I think secretly, and sometimes openly, my peers respect the insanity.'"

Too Soon? Famous/Infamous Faces 1995-2010 [Pre-Order]

Profile: "One of the most serious gaps that this blog has not yet filled is as follows: having been scandalously silent of the great art of Drew Friedman, one of the most popular and recognizable contemporary American illustrators, a genius capable of combining, with previously unpublished results, a technique of hyper-realistic depiction with the strong sense of the grotesque that characterizes the creative temperament." – Lucca Boschi, Il Sole 24 Ore (translated from Italian)

Fire & Water: Bill Everett,  the Sub-Mariner and the Birth of   Marvel Comics [September 2010]

Events: At AOL's TV Squad, Aaron Broverman recaps Blake Bell's presentation "Steve Ditko & Bill Everett: Spider-Man, Sub-Mariner, Daredevil & Beyond" at Fan Expo in Toronto, "a panel I expect will be one of the hidden gems of the weekend"

Things to see: 8/27/10
Written by Mike Baehr | Filed under Tony MillionaireTim LaneThings to seeSteven WeissmanSteve BrodnerRoger LangridgeRenee FrenchMatthias LehmannMark KalesnikoMaakiesLove and RocketsKevin Huizengajon vermilyeaJon AdamsJim BlanchardJasonJaime HernandezGabrielle BellEmile BravoDrew WeingDerek Van GiesonDebbie Drechsler 27 Aug 2010 5:00 PM

Periodic clips & strips — click for improved/additional viewing at the sources:

http://www.fantagraphics.com/images/flog/mike/201008/misterelephanthead.jpg

Bleeding Cool uncovers a lost all-ages Roger Langridge rarity

Jaime Hernandez - from Love and Rockets #9

Here's an auction page where you can zoom in on and pan around a scan of Jaime Hernandez original art from Love and Rockets #9

Maakies - Tony Millionaire

• This week's Maakies? Maais oui. Tony Millionaire is still posting them on Facebook for the time being while his website is rebuilt

Time Traveling - Kevin Huizenga

Amazing Facts and Beyond with Leon Beyond - Kevin Huizenga

• Read "Time Traveling" from Ganges #1 at What Things Do; also from Kevin Huizenga, a new Amazing Facts and Beyond with Leon Beyond strip and a curtain-lifting homage to something I can't identify

work in progress - Matthias Lehmann

Matthias Lehmann posts photos of a scratchboard work in progress — stage 1, stage 2

Shane McGowan - Jason

Outland - Jason

Jason illustrations for a Norgwegian music magazine and a Norwegian comic shop , plus a cartoon from 1984

I, Anonymous - Steven Weissman

See You in Heaven! - Steven Weissman

• This week's "I, Anonymous" spot and these church doodles from Steven Weissman seem to be thematically related, don't they?

Batman #8 - Jon Adams

Jon Adams's Covered version of Batman #8 is pretty creepy when you look closely; also, there's a new Truth Serum

Ivoire - Émile Bravo

• A couple of ex libris plates by Émile Bravo, plus a metal dwarf bear figurine

Set to Sea - Drew Weing

Drew Weing presents the final five pages of Set to Sea; the entire story will remain online through September 10

De Briganti e de Brigantesse - Marco Corona

The first page of "Di Briganti e di Brigantesse" from Marco Corona 

Belligerent Piano - Tim Lane

• The new installment of Tim Lane's Belligerent Piano

Leonard Cohen - Jim Blanchard

• Two new paintings by Jim Blanchard: Leonard Cohen and Danger: Diabolik

phoebe - Debbie Drechsler

Debbie Drechsler gets birdy and buggy

San Diego - Gabrielle Bell

• It's the continuation of Gabrielle Bell's "San Diego Comic-Con Comicumentary"

AMC Pacer - Mark Kalesniko

Mark Kalesniko is starting to post the preliminary sketches for his upcoming graphic novel Freeway — the man sure can draw a good AMC Pacer

narwhal - Renee French

• From Renee French: nervous Hagelbarger, a narwhal, a ledge, a... horse?, and seaweed

Ahmed H. Sharif - Steve Brodner

Steve Brodner documents a NYC stabbing of a Muslim cabbie and, in a video drawing for Capitalnewyork.com, a NY State politician

Devil Doll part 4 page 3 - Derek Van Gieson

• From Derek Van Gieson: a new "Devil Doll" sneak peek, hot crustacean jazz, and a Moomin parody; he also has original art and more for sale on Etsy

color

• Here's the color version of that Smoke Signal story panel from Jon Vermilyea 


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