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Category >> Frank Santoro

Fantagraphics at the 2011 Brooklyn Comics & Graphics Festival
Written by janice headley | Filed under Zak SallyVictor KerlowTony MillionaireTom KaczynskiSammy HarkhamMichael KuppermanMark NewgardenLeslie SteinKim DeitchJosh SimmonsJoseph Lambertjon vermilyeajohn kerschbaumJesse MoynihanJasonJack DavisGreg SadowskiGary PanterGary GrothGabrielle BellFrank SantoroeventsDrew FriedmanDash ShawChuck ForsmanBen CatmullAl Columbia 29 Nov 2011 8:10 AM

For the first time ever, Fantagraphics will be exhibiting at the Brooklyn Comics & Graphics Festival! Come visit us this Saturday, December 3rd from 12:00 - 9:00 PM for a wealth of debuts, artist appearances, and the great Gary Groth manning the table!


Gary will be joined by a truly all-star cast of artists for our first BCGF:

1PM: Josh Simmons
2PM: Kim Deitch
3PM: Dash Shaw
5PM: Jack Davis
6PM: Michael Kupperman
7PM: Al Columbia

And even more of our artists will be exhibiting at the show, including Gabrielle Bell, Ben Catmull, Charles Forsman, Drew Friedman, Sammy Harkham, Tom Kaczynski, John Kerschbaum, Victor Kerlow, Joseph Lambert, Mark Newgarden, Jesse Moynihan, Gary Panter, Zak Sally, Leslie Stein, and Jon Vermilyea... PHEW! Pick up their books from our table, and then seek these artists out at their own!


Bring a big bag, because you'll also wanna pick up our excellent debuts at the festival!

Jack Davis: Drawing American Pop Culture - A Career Retrospective 500 Portraits by Tony Millionaire

Jack Davis: Drawing American Pop Culture by Jack Davis
500 Portraits by Tony Millionaire

Action! Mystery! Thrills! Comic Book Covers of the Golden Age 1933-45  Jason Conquers America

Action! Mystery! Thrills! Great Comic Book Covers 1936-1945 edited by Greg Sadowski
Jason Conquers America by Jason


Where can you find all this awesome? Fantagraphics will be in the downstairs section at the Our Lady of Mt. Carmel Church [ 275 North 8th Street ], at tables 31 & 32:


And finally, make sure you don't miss our artists in these panels!  These will all take place at Union Pool  [ 484 Union Avenue # A ], and the panels are free and open to the public:

1:30 PM // JACK DAVIS Q+A

Legendary cartoonist Jack Davis made his mark producing horror and war stories for EC Comics, before finding his métier in satire as one of the original (and longest running) artists for MAD Magazine. As a prolific illustrator, Davis defined the caricatural style of the 1960s and 1970s—and beyond. In this rare public appearance, Davis will discuss his career with Fantagraphics co-publisher Gary Groth and illustrator Drew Friedman.

[ Jack Davis fans, please note: he will also be appearing on Friday, December 2nd at the opening of his exhibit at the Scott Eder Gallery! Don't miss it! ]

2:30 PM // GESTURAL AESTHETICS

As comics have evolved beyond their commercial roots toward more individualistic modes of expression, they have been infused with new influences from other fields of art including printmaking, collage and painting. Additionally, new printing technologies have permitted the reproduction of artwork that more closely shows the work of an artist’s hand. Austin English, Dunja Jankovic and Frank Santoro will discuss new aesthetics in comics with moderator Bill Kartalopoulos.

6:00 PM // THE LANGUAGE IN COMICS

The recent embrace of graphic novels by the publishing industry has led to misguided attempts to evaluate comics according to the standards and conventions of literary fiction. The writing in comics occupies a more peculiar place, with its own constraints and opportunities. John Porcellino, Gabrielle Bell, and David Sandlin will discuss the particular demands of writing within a visually-driven form in this conversation moderated by novelist Myla Goldberg.


So, get ready! And we'll see you in Brooklyn this Saturday!






Daily OCD: 11/15/11
Written by Mike Baehr | Filed under Robert CrumbreviewsPopeyePeanutsPaul NelsonMickey MouseLove and RocketsKevin HuizengaKevin AveryJaime HernandezinterviewsFrank SantoroFloyd GottfredsonEC SegarDisneyDaily OCDCharles M SchulzCarl BarksawardsAline Kominsky-Crumb 15 Nov 2011 7:26 PM

Today's Online Commentary & Diversions:

Esperanza

Awards: Esperanza by Jaime Hernandez has been named by the Gay, Lesbian, Bisexual, and Transgender Round Table of the American Library Association to the long list of nominations for the Over the Rainbow recommended reading list, one of only two (as far as I can tell from my quick skim) comics to be so included

Walt Disney's Donald Duck: Lost in the Andes

Plug: Pamela Paul of The New York Times asks "Diary of a Wimpy Kid" creator Jeff Kinney about his favorite books from childhood: "...[T]he works that stood head and shoulders above the rest were Carl Barks’s ‘Donald Duck’ and ‘Uncle Scrooge’ comics from the 1940s through the 1960s. Mr. Barks wrote tales of high adventure generously peppered with moments of high comedy.... Classics such as ‘Lost in the Andes,’ ‘Only a Poor Man’ and ‘A Christmas for Shacktown’ left a deep impression on me. Mr. Barks taught me that comics could be high art, and I consider his work to be the best storytelling I’ve experienced in any form. ...Fantagraphics has announced that it is publishing the Barks collection in beautiful hardcover books that do great honor to the cartoonist and his stories, and I can’t wait to buy them for my kids. Proof that great storytelling endures from generation to generation."

Review: "This volume [Walt Disney's Donald Duck: Lost in the Andes] reprints tales from December 1948 through August 1949, when Barks was in high feather as a creator of breathless adventures and light comedies for his Ducks... Great pop culture, great analysis. Scrooge is always searching for more gold, and there’s plenty here. [Rating] 10/10" – Michael Barrett, PopMatters

Love and Rockets: New Stories #4

Review: "The finale of the story Jaime has been telling over the past couple of annual issues [of Love and Rockets: New Stories] is a moment of bravura comics storytelling, but the buildup to it in the opening portions of this issue is pretty great as well... Ah, but as nice as these stories are, they all seem to be prelude to the dazzlingly virtuosic end of this chapter in the Locas saga... This could signal an end to the current era of Locas stories, but these characters are less figures of Jaime's imagination than real people alive in the minds of readers everywhere at this point, and even if another story featuring them never appears, we can rest assured that they will continue to live on, somewhere, sometime." – Matthew J. Brady, Warren Peace Sings the Blues

Ganges #4

Plug: On his blog, Frank Santoro declares "Ganges #4 is easily the best comic book of 2011. Case. Fucking. Closed."

Review (Audio): Introducing the latest episode of the Wait, What? podcast, co-host Jeff Lester says "we dollop more praise on Ganges #4 by Kevin Huizenga because honestly that sucker could probably use another five or six dollops."

Walt Disney's Mickey Mouse Vol. 2: Trapped on Treasure Island

Plugs: "Fantagraphics’ collections featuring Charles Schulz’s comic strip masterpiece, Peanuts, are fantastic and if you’re a Peanuts fan, you need to be reading these. Floyd Gottfredson probably did as much to shape the personality of Mickey Mouse and his supporting cast as Carl Barks did for the Disney Ducks, yet his work has never received the same degree of attention as the work of Barks. Fantagraphics is correcting that with Walt Disney’s Mickey Mouse. The first two volumes of this series are fantastic and the strips probably look better here than they did when they were originally published. It’s a joy to watch Gottfredson develop as a storyteller as Mickey and the gang evolve along with him.... There’s also plenty of background material to place the stories into historical perspective. And the collection of Walt Kelly’s Pogo that hits stores this week is gorgeous. I have some of Fantagraphics’ previous Pogo volumes and this one blows them away. I’m also getting into Popeye for the first time with their collections of Segar’s classic strip." – Roger Ash, Westfield Comics Blog

 Everything Is an Afterthought: The Life and Writings of Paul Nelson

Interview: At The Vinyl District, Dulani Wallace talks to author Kevin Avery about Everything Is an Afterthought: The Life and Writings of Paul Nelson: "He would only really enjoy writing about things that meant something to him personally, so there are a few clues about his own life in many of his pieces. So that became the idea — the first half of the book is the biography, the second half of the book is Paul’s writing. It’s kind of like Paul telling his own story."

Love That Bunch

Commentary: At Comic Book Resources, Laura Sneddon, who is documenting her experiences in the postgraduate Comic Studies program at the University of Dundee in Scotland, examines the work of Robert Crumb and Aline Kominsky-Crumb for the class topic "Comics and Gender"

Things to See: 10/3/11 Roundup
Written by Mike Baehr | Filed under Victor KerlowTim LaneTim KreiderThings to seeSteven WeissmanSteve BrodnerStephen DeStefanoSergio PonchioneRichard SalaRenee FrenchRay FenwickPaul KarasikPaul HornschemeierNoah Van SciverNick DrnasoMichael KuppermanMaxLilli CarréLewis TrondheimKevin HuizengaJordan CraneJohnny RyanJim WoodringJim FloraJasonFrank SantoroFantagraphics Bookstorefan artEleanor DavisDave CooperChuck ForsmanBob Fingerman 4 Oct 2011 3:37 AM

Frank caught in the loving tendrils of the sun by Jim Woodring

• Frank "caught in the loving tendrils of the sun" by Jim Woodring; also "Hopelessly outclassed" and "The descent into wealth"

Grotesque - Sergio Ponchione

A Grotesque "family portrait" and Mr. O'Blique postcards that Sergio Ponchione will be giving away to lucky attendees (I think? the autotranslation's a little iffy) at an upcoming festival in Italy

Totem - Jason/Lewis Trondheim

• Ooh, a Jason/Lewis Trondheim exquisite-corpse wraparound cover for a 2004 issue of Belgian comics fanzine Totem; this and film review potpourri at Jason's Cats Without Dogs blog

From Forlorn Funnies no. 1, Huge Suit and The Sea - Paul Hornschemeier

• Sketches and process peeks at Forlorn Funnies #1 at Paul Hornschemeier's The Daily Forlorn

Focus - Kevin Huizenga

Focus book by Kevin Huizenga

http://www.fantagraphics.com/images/flog/mike/201110/art-pope-nyr.jpg

Steve Brodner's portrait of Art Pope for The New Yorker (with process sketches); plus sketches of Lamar Alexander and Chris Christie; all of the above with Steve's commentary

Paul Karasik New Yorker cartoon

• Speaking of The New Yorker, Paul Karasik got a cartoon in there! Congrats Paul! (via Facebook)

Mega-Nerd - Stephen DeStefano

• A whole buncha Stephen DeStefano animation artwork for various projects here, here, here, here, here, here, and here, plus Sea Hag

page from Blammo - Noah Van Sciver

Noah Van Sciver presents a spooky story from the latest issue of Blammo

Richard Sala

Movie night Richard Sala-style (year unknown); also some cozy reading and The 7 Deadly Sins

Tim Lane - St. Louis International Film Festival poster

Tim Lane's poster for the St. Louis International Film Festival (along with its conceptual inspiration)

Great Pumpkin Festival

Steven Weissman and Jordan Crane are putting together an elementary school haunted house for some LUCKY KIDS and here's Steven's flyer for it with Jordan's logo for the school (from Steven via email); also from Steven, his latest "I, Anonymous" spot and Stincker sketchin'

Dave Cooper gig poster

• A fun Dave Cooper gig poster for his friend's band (via Facebook)

http://www.fantagraphics.com/images/flog/mike/201109/forsman-downbylaw.jpg

This comic cover by Chuck Forsman is a fake, but I wish it wasn't

http://www.fantagraphics.com/images/flog/mike/201110/star-trek-retardedness.jpg

A buncha silly Star Trek doodles by Tim Kreider

Ernest

Jim Varney smiles down from heaven on Johnny Ryan

Prison Pit fan art by Sergio Zuniga

Prison Pit fan art by Sergio Zuniga (at Johnny Ryan's blog, along with one previously posted here)

http://www.fantagraphics.com/images/flog/mike/201109/cf-fleury.jpg

Prison Pit fan art by Fréderic Fleury via Twitter

Twain in the Membrane - Dyna Moe

• Mark Twain-via-Michael Kupperman fan art by Dyna Moe (via Facebook, where the artist's profile pic was taken in front of Fantagraphics Bookstore & Gallery)

comic panel by Csaba Mester

• Speaking of Fantagraphics Bookstore and Facebook, here's a panel from a comic in progress by Csaba Mester featuring the former location posted at the latter location

Plus:

• Another Bob Fingerman character design

• Speaking of Facebook yet again, a Victor Kerlow illustration on the subject

Jupiter and Saturn by Frank Santoro

• Many recent illustrations by Max at his El Hombre Duerme, el Fantasma No blog

Recently discovered previously unseen woodblock prints circa 1939 by Jim Flora

Lilli Carré's new looping animated logo for the Eyeworks animation fest is pretty great (tee hee, the "W" is boobs)

A portrait by Nick Drnaso

• A whole ton of stuff from Ray Fenwick's website popped up in my RSS reader and I'm not sure how much of it is new but why not go check it all out anyway

Straw dog on a bed by Renee French

Computer sketches (that is, sketches done on the computer) by Eleanor Davis

Trubble Club is always fun even if we can't tell who drew what

Daily OCD: 9/29/11
Written by Mike Baehr | Filed under videoRichard SalareviewsPaul HornschemeierMomeMichael KuppermanJesse MoynihaninterviewsGreg SadowskiGahan WilsonFrank SantoroDavid BDaily OCDAlex Toth 29 Sep 2011 7:39 PM

Today's Online Commentary & Diversions:

The Hidden

Review: "Sala creates stories in which brightly colored, cartoony art and characters who speak in casual idiom tell of events that aren’t so much humorous or casual as provocative and scary. In [The Hidden], he combines motifs of a postapocalyptic landscape, wanderers, some vampiric businessmen, and, ultimately, Dr. Frankenstein. The stew works perfectly: readers have no chance to engage in incredulity... Characters are introduced at a steady but manageable pace, and it is only at story’s end that the opening pages become horrifyingly clear. Sala works with a full palette of beautiful, gemlike hues held in generous panels. Even the monsters have individuated faces, which only ramps up the horror." – Francisca Goldsmith, School Library Journal

Interview: Comic Book Resources' Shaun Manning talks to Richard Sala about The Hidden: "It's a story about consequences. It's about what happens when you set wheels in motion that maybe you can't control, that in fact spin completely out of control. What do you do? Do you take responsibility for what comes next or, or do you run away and distance yourself from what you've caused and try to pretend it doesn't matter. And it's about what happens when you finally realize that it's up to you to stop what you started. Is that vague enough?! It's not exactly a 'high concept' description, I'm afraid."

Setting the Standard: Comics by Alex Toth 1952-1954

Review: "A dark horse contender for comics creator of the year can be found in the unlikely personage of the late artist Alex Toth... Setting the Standard aims at... a conceptually sound and compelling [goal]: the publication of Toth's work between 1952 and 1954 for the long-defunct comics publisher Standard... The work is in a variety of sturdy, popular genres. The presentation of the comics themselves proves crisp and strong. The manner in which the increasingly valuable Sadowski and his publisher chose to present the supporting material is even better." – Tom Spurgeon, The Comics Reporter

Mark Twain's Autobiography 1910-2010

Review: "I think the most important thing you need to know about [Mark Twain's Autobiography 1910-2010] is that it made me laugh out loud not once, but close to a dozen times. At one point, during an exchange with a famous cartoon strip writer, I think I laughed for a solid minute. It might have been longer, except the neighbors threatened to shoot me. And if they'd done me in, I'd never have gotten a chance to review this and tell you that this is one of the best books -- if not *the* best book -- I've read all year." – Rob McMonigal, Panel Patter

Nuts

Interview: Comic Book Resources' Alex Dueben chats with Gahan Wilson about Nuts: "On the whole, [the comic] was mostly autobiographical. It just rolled out and it was and continues to be very satisfying to me. It helped me see kids better, too. They're just wonderful. The creativity of children is kind of frightening. They all do these drawings which are just gorgeous and profound, and they'll do poetry. They're brilliant.... I think they're very encouraging because they give you a peek at what we could be if we grew up right. I think there's hope for us all, and kids are evidence of that."

Mome Vol. 22: Fall 2011 - Jesse Moynihan

Interview: At The Comics Journal it's a Mome dude tête-à-tête as Frank Santoro quizzes Jesse Moynihan: "I did some color guides with Photoshop for a piece called Simon Magus (MOME 22). That was helpful but not usually how I do things. Since I’m using a medium that can build layers, it’s not difficult to go back in and edit the color scheme to an extent. For the most part I trust that my eye can decide what needs to happen on the fly."

The Armed Garden and Other Stories

Interview (Audio): On the latest episode of the Panel Borders podcast, Alex Fitch talks to David B. about his new book Black Paths (audio in multiple formats at the link)

Interview (Video): At SPX, Paul Hornschemeier sat down for an on-camera chat with Joe Mochove and Rusty Rowley. "We discuss all of the important topics of the day: Earnest Borgnine, mobility scooters, terrorism, and delicious orange juice," says Paul at his blog. (What is it with the Borgnine?)

Things to See: 9/26/11 Roundup
Written by Mike Baehr | Filed under Things to seeTaking Punk to the MassesSteven WeissmanSteve BrodnerStephen DeStefanoRon Regé JrRenee FrenchPaul HornschemeierNoah Van SciverMaxLorenzo MattottiLilli CarréKevin HuizengaJohnny RyanJim WoodringJim FloraJim BlanchardJasonFrank Santorofan artEleanor DavisAnders Nilsen 27 Sep 2011 3:36 AM

lettering - Jason

Lettering by Jason for Athos in America; other recent Cats Without Dogs blog posts include Woody Allen movie reviews and an R.E.M. top 5

http://www.fantagraphics.com/images/flog/mike/201109/littleguy.jpg

• From Kevin Huizenga, a couple of images from an upcoming anthology contribution (the originals of which are part of the Dylan Williams benefit auctions)

Frank in the Museum of Sex - Jim Woodring

Frank in the Museum of Sex, a recently-completed painting by Jim Woodring; also, Frank and the Living Rock, a drawing; Icebreaker, a drawing; and Frank in an unusual place, a photo

Aqualad - Steven Weissman

• Aqualad action by Steven Weissman at Repaneled; also his weekly "I, Anonymous " spot

Taking Punk to the Masses poster design - Jim Blanchard

• Unused (amazingly) poster design by Jim Blanchard for EMP's Nirvana: Taking Punk to the Masses exhibit

Cartoon Utopia - Ron Regé Jr.

Cartoon Utopia drawings by Ron Regé Jr. (still raising cash to aid in the completion of the book)

robot - Eleanor Davis

Eleanor Davis robot portraits and trial sketches for the GR2 Robots art show; also a band sketch and custom book cover

Epistemics - Paul Hornschemeier

Paul Hornschemeier continues posting Forlorn Funnies prep artwork and other drawings on his The Daily Forlorn blog

storyboard - Stephen DeStefano

Stephen DeStefano gets Trekky in this recent storyboard work

Lorenzo Mattotti - The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn

• Versions of Lorenzo Mattotti's cover illustration for The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn in various states and media

Caliban - Max

Caliban from Shakespeare's The Tempest and more by Max

http://www.fantagraphics.com/images/flog/mike/201109/johnny-ryan.jpg

Prison Pit fan art by Jon Light

Plus:

Updates on Frank Santoro's Tumblr including new drawings

New updates on the Jim Flora blog with vintage spot illustrations

Glow-in-the-dark prints by Lilli Carré

• A Noah Van Sciver "Chicken Strips" story from 2007

• One of Renee French's patented cute-n-creepy guys

Steve Brodner redesigns the symbol of justice in light of the Troy Davis execution

More travel sketches by Anders Nilsen

Things to See: 9/19/11 Roundup
Written by Mike Baehr | Filed under Victor KerlowThings to seeSteven WeissmanSteve BrodnerStephen DeStefanoRichard SalaRenee FrenchPaul HornschemeierMaxMatthias LehmannMark KalesnikoMarco CoronaMalachi WardLeslie SteinJohn CuneoFrank SantoroDerek Van GiesonDame DarcyBob FingermanAnders Nilsen 20 Sep 2011 1:36 AM

The Ice King - Paul Hornschemeier

Paul Hornschemeier's rendition of the Ice King, from Zack Smith's enviable collection of Adventure Time-themed sketches

From “True Luxury” in Forlorn Funnies no. 1 - Paul Hornschemeier

Paul Hornschemeier is beginning to post teasers of his forthcoming Forlorn Funnies #1 along with the sketches at his The Daily Forlorn blog

2012 - Steven Weissman

This drawing by Steven Weissman appears to be related to the current Barack Hussein Obama strip; plus his latest "I, Anonymous" spot

Adam Ant & Darryl Hannah - Dame Darcy

• Celebrate International Talk Like a Pirate Day with Dame Darcy as she pays tribute to Adam Ant x 2 (plus Darryl Hannah in Splash) — this and more in her new blog update

Max

• Sketches and illustrations by Max at his El Hombre Duerme, el Fantasma No blog

The Creature - Richard Sala

The Creature (which you can buy) and a few sneak peeks at The Hidden on Richard Sala's Tumblr blog

Leslie Stein - from Eye of the Majestic Creature #7

• From Leslie Stein, an excerpt from the forthcoming Eye of the Majestic Creature #7

Gravity - Malachi Ward

• "Gravity," a new painting by Malachi Ward

etchfruits - Renee French

Renee French zooms in on the gross part of a box of fruit; also we all feel like this sometimes

Troy Davis - Steve Brodner

• From Steve Brodner: Ron Paul, Sen. Joe Manshin, Troy Davis (above; all with relevant info & commentary)

sketchbook - Anders Nilsen

Sketchbook stories by Anders Nilsen

The Lovely Sparrows - Tall Cedars of Lebanon - Derek Van Gieson

The Lovely Sparrows CD cover illustration by Derek Van Gieson (click to see wraparound)

Plus:

Matthias Lehmann's sketches and notes for a new comics project

Character designs by Bob Fingerman for a series of post-apocalyptic YA novels he's working on 

An illustration for Bloomberg View by Victor Kerlow

More mythological drawings by correspondence-course teacher Frank Santoro

• Sketchbook strips by Marco Corona at his Il Canguro Pugilatore blog

• Wild-n-woolly sketchbook drawings by John Cuneo

A portrait sketch by Mark Kalesniko

Recent storyboard work by Stephen DeStefano

Things to See: 9/12/11 Roundup
Written by Mike Baehr | Filed under Wilfred SantiagoVictor KerlowTony MillionaireThings to seeSteven WeissmanSteve BrodnerStephen DeStefanoSergio PonchionePeter BaggePaul HornschemeierNoah Van SciverNick DrnasoNate NealMatthias LehmannMarco CoronaLorenzo MattottiLaura ParkJack DavisFrank SantoroEleanor DavisDebbie DrechslerChuck Forsman21 13 Sep 2011 3:00 AM

Lisa sketch - Peter Bagge

• Convention sketches inspired by song lyrics is a pretty great idea, and an Atlanta comic fan named Erich collects them and posts them on his blog. Above: Lisa Leavenworth + Mudhoney by Peter Bagge (hat tip: CBR)

Hipster's Guide to Sports - Noah Van Sciver

Noah Van Sciver illustrates the Denver Westword's "hipster's guide to sports"

Funny Valentine - Jack Davis

• More Jack Davis fun from Will Pfeifer's Today's Inspiration blog, as Pfeifer presents a bunch of Davis-illustrated "Funny Valentines" Topps cards (hat tip: The Comics Reporter)

Victor Kerlow draws Julie Hagerty and Albert Books in Lost in America for The New Yorker

Victor Kerlow draws Julie Hagerty and Albert Books in Lost in America for The New Yorker

Nita Goes Home sketches - Eleanor Davis

Eleanor Davis presents a preview of her Mome 22 story "Nita Goes Home" on her Doing Fine blog and sketches for the story (like the above) on her We Be Ouija blog

Mad Men - John Cuneo

John Cuneo recent illustrations & sketches including Mad Men above

Lorenzo Mattotti

A book cover illustration (above) and preliminary sketches, and a New Yorker cover from January, by Lorenzo Mattotti

Stravinsky - Sergio Ponchione

More composer illustrations (like Stravinsky here) and Linus illustrations from Sergio Ponchione

The Ten Thousand and First Thing - Nate Neal

Nate Neal posts the prologue to his new book in progress, The Ten Thousand and First Thing

prologue - Nick Drnaso

• Speaking of prologues, here's one from Nick Drnaso

puppylove - Laura Park

Laura Park got a new puppy! He helps her draw.

The End of the Fucking World - Chuck Forsman

Chuck Forsman posted images of his new minicomic The End of the Fucking World which he had at SPX (and his nice-looking cat Bruce)

Cut it out. - Paul Hornschemeier

• Of course I'm going to post this one from Paul Hornschemeier's The Daily Forlorn sketch blog

Coach and Two by Tony Millionaire

Coach and Two by Tony Millionaire

Peter Criss Diary sketches - Steven Weissman

Steven Weissman's sketches and notes for "Peter Criss Diary" as seen in Mome 22, plus his latest "I, Anonymous" spots at his Chewing Gum in Church blog

21 dedication - Wilfred Santiago

• Whoever Jason is that's a pretty sweet dedication sketch by Wilfred Santiago in his birthday-present copy of 21

Plus:

Matthias Lehmann shows a bit of a new magazine illustration

Frank Santoro draws another Greek myth

• Sketches and drawings by Marco Corona at his Il Canguro Pugilatore blog

Debbie Drechsler sketches some unusual finches

Stephen DeStefano posted a couple of his character drawings from the late lamented Sym-Bionic Titan: Lance in action and a crowd scene

Steve Brodner draws and comments on last week's GOP debate, 9/11 cash-ins and this hilarious one on the fate of Anthony Weiner's House seat

Things to See: 9/7/11 Roundup
Written by Mike Baehr | Filed under Wendy ChinWally WoodvideoTim LaneThings to seeSteven WeissmanSteve BrodnerStephen DeStefanoSergio PonchioneSammy HarkhamRoger LangridgeRichard SalaRenee FrenchPaul HornschemeierNoah Van SciverNate NealMichael KuppermanMatthias LehmannMarco CoronaLove and RocketsLorenzo MattottiLilli CarréLaura ParkJosh SimmonsJoseph LambertJohnny RyanJim BlanchardJasonJaime HernandezJack DavisHans RickheitGeorge ChieffetGary PanterFrank SantoroEleanor DavisDrew FriedmanDerek Van GiesonDebbie DrechslerDash ShawDame DarcyChuck ForsmanBasil WolvertonAndrei MolotiuAnders Nilsen 7 Sep 2011 4:48 AM

Lots and lots of images to share, and lots and lots of overflow spilling over into links:

Lilli Carré sketchbook

• We linked to this a while back in Daily OCD, but the interview with Lilli Carré at art:21 includes the first glimpse of her sketchbook I've ever seen (along with other art) and daaaang; Lilli also drew Groo the Wanderer for Matthew J. Brady 's theme sketchbook (there's a good one by Jeremy Tinder too) AND did this illustraton for The New York Times AND this amazing letterpress print

hipster Obama - Drew Friedman

• Is Barack Obama losing his indie cred? Drew Friedman shares his illustration for the New York Observer about the President falling out of favor with the hipster demographic, and...

Bruce Jay Friedman by Drew Friedman

• Aww, Drew Friedman's portrait of his dad Bruce Jay Friedman for Tablet; Drew also presents an awesome gallery of Plop! covers by Basil Wolverton and Wally Wood at his blog

http://www.fantagraphics.com/images/flog/mike/201108/xaime-shameidols-1.jpg

http://www.fantagraphics.com/images/flog/mike/201108/xaime-shameidols-2.jpg

• Some Jaime Hernandez record-cover art I hadn't seen before, for the band The Shame Idols (via Love & Maggie)

Robert Smith - The Cure - Jason

• This one makes Janice very happy: Jason draws Robert Smith of The Cure — plus film reviews and various other commentary at his Cats Without Dogs blog

My Favorite Bullies... - Johnny Ryan

Johnny Ryan draws some of his favorite bullies for Vice and shares some recent commissions on his Flickr page: Gremlin/robot orgy, Star Wars 4-way and fuckball

Jack Davis - Grover - Sesame Street

• Wowee-wow, lookit these vintage Sesame Street illustrations by Jack Davis that were posted by Leif Peng at his Today's Inspiration blog (via Drawn)

Dig this nifty nutty video that Michael Kupperman made for no particular reason; then when you're done, watch this psychedelic one

Gary Panter dog biscuits

Gary Panter sending this box of dog biscuits to a dog named Gary Panter is probably about the cutest thing you'll read all day

sketchbook battle - Steven & Charles Weissman

• I think Steven Weissman loses this sketchbook battle with his son Charles — that and his weekly "I, Anonymous" spots and more at his Chewing Gum in Church blog

Paul Hornschemeier

• Writer Dan Sinker shares the evolution of Paul Hornschemeier's cover illustration for The F***ing Epic Twitter Quest of @MayorEmanuelvia Paul's blog, where Paul also shares a website header illustration and accompanying interview; also, about umpteen new entries on his daily sketch blog The Daily Forlorn

Eleanor Davis - Stomachless

Eleanor Davis illustrates for The New York Times and for Rattler magazine

Richard Sala

Richard Sala presents the original, unretouched artwork for his Kramer's Ergot 7 strip, likewise for a Peculia story, plus some words on "Invisible Hands" — plus a whole lot more on his Tumblr blog

Welcome to Hopeville, USA - Tim Lane

The first page of a feature graphic story Tim Lane is doing for the Riverfront Times, to appear later this month, plus some of Tim's sketches for the story

Art Spiegelman - Lorenzo Mattotti

Lorenzo Mattotti previews 3 upcoming publishing projects: a graphic adaptation of Mark Twain's The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn and a collection of Venice landscapes; and a collaboration with Art Spiegelman for an upcoming September 11-themed collection from Casterman

Professor Hackensack - Sergio Ponchione

Sergio Ponchione teases his Prof. Hackensack strip and illustrations in the new Linus as well as some recent illustrations of classical composers

Laura Park - The Believer

Laura Park's strip for this month's issue of The Believer, plus a Picasso-esque sketch (and, if you look around, lots of photos of her adorable new puppy)

Derek Van Gieson & Laura Park

• Speaking of Laura Park, Derek Van Gieson did this little jam strip with her on a recent visit to Chicago, where they and others also took part in a little Trubble Club action; more from Derek at his These Days I Remain blog

Lithuanian Sweetheart - Stephen DeStefano

Stephen DeStefano illustrated this poster for a new Washington, DC staging of Lithuanian Sweetheart, a play written by his Lucky in Love collaborator George Chieffet; also, an album cover illustration, Popeye playing hockey, Popeye playing soccer

Louie

Louis C.K. fan art on Josh Simmons & Wendy Chin's Quackers blog (I'm not sure who did it — I'm guessing Wendy... and if you don't watch Louie you should) — meanwhile Josh has a couple new doodles on his The Furry Trap blog

http://www.fantagraphics.com/images/flog/mike/201109/fridaybefore1.jpg

• I was going post Renee French's portrait of the Crimson Bolt (Rainn Wilson's character from the movie Super) but I decided to go with this more mysterious, less link-baity piece instead

Will Oldham - Sammy Harkham

Sammy Harkham's 2009 portrait of singer-songwriter Will Oldham for Colors magazine

Warren Buffett - Steve Brodner

• From Steve Brodner: Warren Buffett for Harper's (above); the SE; Planet of the Apes for The New Yorker; Rome sketchbook; Keystone XL pipeline protestors; and feral CEOs

sketchbook - Anders Nilsen

Sketchbook pages and more sketchbook pages by Anders Nilsen

The Ruined Cast storyboards

Glimpses of 11 binders worth of storyboards for Dash Shaw's The Ruined Cast

diorama - Hans Rickheit

Views of some rather astonishing cut-out dioramas made by Hans Rickheit for a recent art show

Additionally:

Colleen Frakes shares some birthday sketch comics done for her by Mome contributors Joe Lambert and Chuck Forsman

A drawing by Matthias Lehmann for an upcoming book from Le Dernier Cri

Recent drawings by Andrei Molotiu

• The latest creations and updates from Dame Darcy at her blog

Frank Santoro is selling his sketches of "black & white boom" cover art, along with the original comics, to help keep him in cash while he works on his new comic — there's a new mythology piece on his Tumblr too

• A bunch of new sketches by Marco Corona at his Il Canguro Pugilatore blog

• From Jim Blanchard, a rollerderby poster and a painting of Tura Satana

Bird sketches with field notes by Debbie Drechsler

A performance poster illustrated by Nate Neal

An image-packed update on various works in progress from Noah Van Sciver

Roger Langridge sketches Popeye vs. Bluto

Daily OCD: 8/1/11
Written by Mike Baehr | Filed under ZapWilfred SantiagoWalt KellyUsagi YojimboStan SakaiShimura TakakoreviewsPeanutsMoto HagioMickey MouseMichael KuppermanMaurice TillieuxmangaJim WoodringJack ColeFrank SantoroFloyd GottfredsonEC ComicsDrew WeingDrew FriedmanDisneyDave McKeanDash ShawDaily OCDCharles M SchulzAlex Chun21 1 Aug 2011 9:09 PM

Today's Online Commentary & Diversions:

Gil Jordan, Private Detective: Murder by High Tide

Review: "Originally appearing from 1958 to 1960, these insouciant, stylish, and thrilling dramas should appeal to readers of all ages. If they don't hook a whole new batch of bande dessinée fans, France needs to take back the Statue of Liberty in a huff.... Both stories zip by with nary a dull patch. Confections lacking in gravitas, they nevertheless own the supreme virtues of lightness and panache. Tillieux's art is always easy on the eye.... If Spielberg is looking for a second franchise after Tintin, he couldn't go wrong with Gil Jordan." – Paul Di Filippo, The Barnes & Noble Review

Wandering Son Vol. 1

List: At About.com - Manga, Deb Aoki shares comments that she and her fellow panelists on the "Best and Worst Manga" panel at Comic-Con made about Wandering Son Vol. 1 by Shimura Takako (named a Best New Teen Manga and a Best New Grown-Up Manga) and A Drunken Dream and Other Stories by Moto Hagio (named a Best New Grown-Up Manga)

Review: "Thanks to well known translator Matt Thorn, this volume is a very smooth read. I don’t often comment on such things, but Thorn took great care in interpreting and presenting this book, and it pays off in a very pleasing flow of text. The art is also quite lovely, very simplistic, and flows well from panel to panel. The color pages in the beginning have a beautiful, water color look to them. Fantagraphics has put out a gorgeous hardcover book with Wandering Son." – Kristin Bomba, ComicAttack.net

The Pin-Up Art of Humorama

Review: "Fantagraphics’ The Pin-Up Art of Humorama collects hundreds of racy cartoons from the once-ubiquitous tasteless humor mag.... The Fantagraphics edition, edited by Alex Chun and Jacob Covey, 'remasters' these toons with a two-color treatment that really captures the graphic feel of the mouldering pulps that still grace the ends of yard-sale tables in cities across America. It must be said that none of these are very funny, but they’re often quite beautiful and nostalgic." – Cory Doctorow, Boing Boing

Walt Disney's Mickey Mouse Vol. 1: Race to Death Valley

Review: "Every once in a while, a book comes along that is simply spectacular. This collection of [Mickey Mouse] comic strips by Floyd Gottfredson is a perfect example of how to present, analyze and reconstruct subject matter that is viewed differently today. The series editors (David Gerstein and Gary Groth) pull no punches in discussing why Mickey was carrying a gun or the use of slang that is noticeably offensive by today's standards. This is a wonderful vehicle for presenting historically accurate art. Other companies should take notice.... This is a stunning work. The historical presentation is flawless, as is the artwork." – George Taylor, Imaginerding

Celluloid [Pre-Order]

Review: "[In Celluloid], McKean is attempting to subvert hardened notions of both comics and pornography. It's a book that gets the blood racing just as it raises questions that just won't go away about the nature of art, porn, and the male gaze.... By painting an erotic sequence with a surrealist's brush, McKean reveals the raw sexual current that underscores all pornography." – Peter Bebergal, Bookslut

Review: "An unapologetically hard-core hardcover, Celluloid follows a young woman’s sexual epiphany... and feels almost like a silent, erotic Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland, with the White Rabbit and the rabbit-hole replaced by an ancient movie camera and a doorway to…somewhere else. By itself, typically, McKean’s technical mastery (beginning with pen and ink and finishing with photography) steals the breath away; ditto his visual motifs — involving fruit, say, or eyes. A bravura performance, Celluloid (which ends, by the way, with signal wit) constitutes an astounding fusion of the Dionysiac and the Apolline, in Nietzschean terms, and less invites reading than demands rereading." – Bryan A. Hollerbach, PLAYBACK:stl

Congress of the Animals

Review: "In the oneiric power of his work as a writer/artist, Jim Woodring enjoys few rivals in contemporary comics... Within the first ten pages of Congress of the Animals, calamity literally descends on poor Frank in the form of a wood-boxed croquet set. In the next ten, our bucktoothed, bobtail boyo suffers both a labor dispute and a credit crisis, and thereafter, in the U.S. in 2011, it should come as no surprise that things fast go from bad to worse; just for starters, Frank has to enter the working world. Ameliorating all of his tribulations, at least from readers’ vantage, are his creator’s nonpareil pen and undulant line — a quivery visual seduction courtesy of Higgins. Moreover, by the finale, Frank’s [spoiler redacted – Ed.] — so the little guy ain’t doin’ too bad, y’know?" – Bryan A. Hollerbach, PLAYBACK:stl

Review: "Like Weathercraft, this new work [Congress of the Animals] is completely silent, showcasing Woodring's amazing talent to convey a story without a word, with seemingly little effort. It's just an eye-popping visual feast of amazing illustrations in this crazy world where Woodring can put whatever he wants on the page, to a stunning end result." – Dave Ferraro, Comics-and-More (via the SPX Tumblr)

21: The Story of Roberto Clemente

Review: "How wrong I was to underestimate the powerful storytelling medium of the emerging graphic novel platform, especially when masterfully rendered by an author and artist as remarkably talented as Santiago. I expected an exciting visual presentation, and was not disappointed, as Santiago’s heavy-lined, representational graphic style was, in turn whimsical, arresting, quirky, and most of all, emotional. But I wasn’t prepared for the wonderfully passionate portrayal of the human side of Clemente’s legendary journey from Puerto Rico into baseball immortality.... Captivating, revealing, and dramatic, 21 accomplished through art, creative use of informed imagination, and pure passion, far more than I thought possible from a graphic novel. I believe I now have a more complete picture of Roberto Clemente, but not of his statistics, or even his style of play, or of his place in baseball history. I have a truer sense of his heart." – Mark W. Schraf, Spitball

The Complete Peanuts 1950-1952 (Vol. 1) [NORTH AMERICA ONLY]

Review: Adorable alert! At Bookie Woogie, 11-year-old Gracie (and her dad Aaron Zenz) review The Complete Peanuts:

Gracie:  Charlie Brown!  He's the one who thinks, "Life is going bad... I'm an awful person... Nothing good ever happens to me..."
Dad:  Would you be friends with him?
Gracie:  I would. I love him. My love for him goes to the ceiling of a skyscraper.  But nothing good ever happens to him ever. Once he won a race -- that's probably the only thing he's ever won. And the prize was 5 free haircuts...
Dad:  Ha!
Gracie:  He's only got a twist of hair in front. And he's like, "Five free hair cuts?  I don't have much hair to cut! And even if I did... my dad is a barber!"
Dad:  Poor Charlie Brown.
Gracie:  Yeah, nothing good ever happens to him. He's always getting teased for his perfectly round head.

Usagi Yojimbo Book 4: The Dragon Bellow Conspiracy

Interview: The Comics Reporter's Tom Spurgeon talks with Stan Sakai: "Usagi was first published 27 years ago, and that time I just concentrated on the next story. It was around maybe... I would say with book four, The Dragon Bellow Conspiracy. That was the first major storyline. It took maybe 10 issues or something, I'm not exactly sure. Maybe eight issues.... Before then, I was thinking, 'Usagi's going to be canceled any month.' [laughter] 'I can't spend too much time devoting myself to a long storyline.' But once I did that and got over that hurdle, that's when I realized that hey, this could go on for a long time."

Pogo - Vol. 1 of the Complete Syndicated Comic Strips: Through the Wild Blue Wonder

List: The Hooded Utilitarian begins revealing the top 10 results in their International Best Comics Poll, with Walt Kelly's Pogo coming in at #8

Even More Old Jewish Comedians

Plug: Canada's National Post spotlights Drew Friedman's forthcoming book Even More Old Jewish Comedians

Mark Twain's Autobiography 1910-2010

Plug: Michael Kupperman's Mark Twain's Autobiography 1910-2010 was a favorite acquisition at Comic-Con among some of Comics Alliance 's writers

Set to Sea

Plug: "A trip to the comics shop yesterday netted me a copy of Drew Weing’s Set to Sea. It’s pure indulgence, because I have already read the story online, but Fantagraphics’ small, almost jewel-like presentation is really beautiful. Weing tells his story one panel at a time, and each panel could be framed as a work of art in itself, so having it in a book, without the clutter of the web, is a worthy investment." – Brigid Alverson, Robot 6

Classic Pin-up Art of Jack Cole [Softcover Ed.]

Commentary: Robot 6's Chris Mautner recommends The Classic Pin-Up Art of Jack Cole and Betsy and Me as "further reading" in his "Comics College" introduction to Jack Cole's work

TCJ.com

Commentary: At The Comics Journal, Frank Santoro talks about working with Dash Shaw on Dash's animation project and drawing for animation vs. drawing for comics

EC Comics logo

Scene: Comic Book Resources' Marlan Harris gives a recap of our 35th Anniversary panel at Comic-Con — unfortunately it contains several factual errors, some of which I have endeavored to correct in the comments thread

Scene: Our EC and ZAP announcements top Michael Dooley's list of 13 highlights from Comic-Con at Print magazine's Imprint blog

Daily OCD: 6/12/11
Written by Mike Baehr | Filed under Zak SallyreviewsPeanutsMickey MouseLewis TrondheimKim ThompsonKevin HuizengaJoe SaccoJim WoodringJasonFrank SantoroFloyd GottfredsonFantagraphics BookstoreDisneyDame DarcyDaily OCDCharles M SchulzBlake BellBill EverettAlex Toth 13 Jun 2011 3:49 AM

Ran out of time on Friday's Online Commentary & Diversions, so it's combined with links from the weekend:

Walt Disney's Mickey Mouse Vol. 1: Race to Death Valley

Review: "Now Fantagraphics has risen to the fore with [Walt Disney's Mickey Mouse Vol. 1:] Race to Death Valley... It’s a pretty spiffy package, sharply designed and full of smart, well-written essays that provide a rich portrait of the artist and his times, as well as some great comics.... As impressive as Gottfredson's work is, it's in the ancillary materials or 'special features' that makes this book really shine. Editors Gary Groth and David Gerstein have gone the extra mile here... With its shameless abundance of riches, Mickey Mouse Vol. 1 sets a new standard in reprint publication." – Chris Mautner, Robot 6

Plug: "Only a small handful of Gottfredson's collected works have been published and most are out of print. He pioneered a trendsetting style of adventure comics, though in his lifetime remained largely unrecognized.... Fantagraphics has kindly republished a bit of the Gottfredson Mickey run in their new book [Walt Disney's Mickey Mouse Vol. 1:] Race to Death Valley, beautifully restored [and] repackaged..." – Green Apple Books

The Complete Peanuts 1979-1980 (Vol. 15)

Review: "The latest volume of The Complete Peanuts: 1979-1980 continues with Charles Schulz’s herculean output of his beloved comic strip. Schulz supplies the customary laughs in stand-alone gag strips and some short 'continuing' storylines.... As I have said in previous reviews, Fantagraphics does such a marvelous job with these hardcover Peanuts volumes. From the cover by designer Seth, to the crisp black-and-white reprinting (3 dailies per page, 1 Sunday per page), to the handy index to help you find your favorite strip, Fantagraphics takes creating a permanent archive of this beloved humor strip very seriously. Children of all ages should all get their hands on this American treasure." – Rich Clabaugh, The Christian Science Monitor

Commentary: Mike Sterling makes a few observations about The Complete Peanuts 1979-1980: "SPOILER ALERT: Peppermint Patty gathers evidence and uses skeptical, critical thinking to resolve her particular issue here."

Approximate Continuum Comics

Review: "Some of the very first autobiographical works on the French bande dessinée scene, these little gems were a genuine game-changer for cartoonists and storytellers... Superbly skilled at switching imperceptibly from broad self-parody to cripplingly painful personal revelation, wild surrealism to powerful reportage and from clever humorous observation to howling existentialist inquisition, Trondheim’s cartoon interior catalogue is always a supremely rewarding and enjoyable experience and, as these ancient texts [Approximate Continuum Comics] prove, always has been." – Win Wiacek, Now Read This!

Fire & Water: Bill Everett, the Sub-Mariner and the Birth of Marvel Comics

Review: "[Blake] Bell is our guide into this rich history of Bill Everett... Bell includes several pieces of artwork and comics that has rarely been seen. A true testament to a man who lived comics throughout his entire life and loved it with a passion...[I]t’s important not only to remember the characters, but the men behind them. Bell’s book here on the life and times of Bill Everett [Fire & Water], and his other biographical material on Steve Ditko, is a testament to that." – Chris Marshall, Collected Comics Library

Congress of the Animals

Plug (Audio): NPR's Glen Weldon gives a shout-out to Jim Woodring's Congress of the Animals on the new episode of the Pop Culture Happy Hour podcast at the NPR Monkey See blog

Setting the Standard: Comics b Alex Toth 1952-1954

Plug: At Robot 6, Michael May's tour of the current Previews catalog takes note of "Setting the Standard: Comics by Alex Toth 1952-1954 – Everyone knows that you’re supposed to revere Alex Toth, because chances are your favorite comics artist already does. Here’s where you find out why."

Safe Area Gorazde: The Special Edition

Interview: Hillary Chute talks to Joe Sacco for The Believer; I'll use their pullquote: "When you draw, you can always capture that moment. You can always have that exact, precise moment when someone’s got the club raised, when someone’s going down. I realize now there’s a lot of power in that."

Interview: The A.V. Club's Sam Adams talks to Joe Sacco: "I think if I hadn’t studied journalism I might have taken a different approach, and I’m not saying my approach is the only way you can tell a story journalistically. But because I actually studied it, detail is important and accuracy is really important, so it’s not just about having an accurate quote. The problem with doing things the way I try to do them is that it’s not just an accurate quote, it’s an accurate image of what a place looks like. An absolute literal group of images? You might as well go to a photographer for that. But whatever interpretation I do of it, it has to be informed by reality."

Interview (Video): Joe Sacco gives a talk and reading and is interviewed by Chris Hedges in these two videos presented by the Lannan Foundation (streaming and downloadable audio are also available at the preceding link; via Forbidden Planet International )

Like a Dog

Interview (Video): Justin Skarhus of Itchy Keen Art Friends talks to Zak Sally and our pal Dylan Williams of Sparkplug Comic Books about D'in' it Y, part 1

Meat Cake

Profile: HiLobrow's Joshua Glenn on Dame Darcy: "If she sounds like too much to handle, that’s because she is; now you know why her comic is called Meat Cake — they’re two decadent foods, so why not combine them? Darcy’s world is a child’s garden of verses overrun by drunken mermaids, grave-robbing French maids, and Vitalis-groomed cads. If this sort of thing sounds like your cup of spooky-kooky tea, read Meat Cake..."

Fantagraphics Bookstore & Gallery

Profile: "I made my quarterly pilgrimage down to the Fantagraphics store in Seattle yesterday, and that store never ceases to amaze anyone who walks into it. From the curator/owner to the punk rock pictures on the wall, to the awesome collection of Fantagraphics titles, traditional comics, underground comics, and some adult stuff tucked away in the back room under the stairs, the entire store is a place to go explore the darker side of comic books." – Dan Morrill, Comics Forge

Ganges #4

Craft: At TCJ.com, Frank Santoro provides a bit of a behind-the-scenes glimpse at the creation of Ganges #4 from a recent visit he had with Kevin Huizenga

Athos in America

Feature: Find out what Kim Thompson's been reading (the image above is one clue/spoiler) as he contributes to this week's "What Are You Reading?" column at Robot 6


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