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Category >> Harvey Kurtzman

Fantagraphics at the 2014 Asbury Park Comicon!
Written by janice headley | Filed under Peter BaggeMiss Lasko-GrossHarvey KurtzmaneventsCharles ForsmanBob Fingerman 11 Mar 2014 10:39 AM

Yo, Jersey! Several Fantagraphics artists will be guests of honor at the 2014 Asbury Park Comicon on Saturday, April 12th and Sunday, April 13th!

This year's special guests include Peter Bagge, Bob Fingerman, Charles Forsman, and Miss Lasko-Gross, among many others, but these are clearly the best. 

Not only can you get your books signed by these folks, but you can also catch some panels throughout the weekend, particularly on Saturday, on the lower level of the Berkeley Oceanfront Hotel. Such as:

Saturday

•  1:00 PM // The World of Harvey Kurtzman: Denis Kitchen on the life and art of the incredible Harvey Kurtzman, creator of Mad magazine, Little Annie Fannie, Frontline Combat, Help Magazine and much more.

•  4:00 PM // The Neat Stuff in Mind of Peter Bagge: Funny book creator Peter Bagge in conversation with Jon B. Cooke.

There's some other panels, but y'know, those are clearly the best. 

And, just when you think it can't get better: performing at the Comicon After-Party on Saturday night, it's The Julie Ruin, a project from Kathleen Hanna, former lead singer of Bikini Kill and Le Tigre! Holy crap!

The Asbury Park Comicon runs from 10 AM to 6 PM each day at the Berkeley Oceanfront Hotel, located at 1401 Ocean Blvd. Visit their website for travel help, including the tip: "Have some self-respect -- don't take the bus."

Bomb Run and Other Stories (The EC Comics Library) by John Severin - Excerpt
Written by Mike Baehr | Filed under Will ElderpreviewsJohn SeverinHarvey KurtzmanEC ComicsComing Attractions 13 Feb 2014 12:50 PM

Harvey Kurtzman's taut, humanistic scripts and John Severin's gritty, detailed artwork (inked with preternatural precision, usually by Will Elder) combined to make some of the finest war stories ever told in any medium in the pages of EC Comics. Bomb Run and Other Stories collects all of this essential work in one hardcover volume for the first time.

Our downloadable excerpt comes complete with the Table of Contents and three full stories: the centuries-spanning "How They Die!"; the cautionary WWII tale "Weak Link!"; and the high-flying, Greek myth-inspired title story. Originally on the calendar for July, we wrapped this one a little early, so it might move up on the schedule. Either way, you can pre-order your copy right now and be among the first to get a copy (and combine it with the upcoming Joe Orlando volume Judgment Day for 20% savings!).

Bomb Run and Other Stories (The EC Comics Library) by John Severin

The EC Comics Slipcase Vol. 1 - Video & Photo Preview
Written by Mike Baehr | Filed under Wallace Woodvideopreviewsnew releasesJack DavisHarvey KurtzmanEC ComicsAl WilliamsonAl Feldstein 11 Feb 2014 2:26 PM

The EC Comics Slipcase Vol. 1
by Harvey KurtzmanWallace WoodJack DavisAl WilliamsonAl Feldstein et al.

832-page four-volume hardcover 7.5" x 10.5" x 4" slipcased box set • $94.99
ISBN: 978-1-60699-728-4

Ships in: March 2014 (subject to change) — Pre-Order Now  

EC Comics Logo

A boxed set of our first four books in our acclaimed EC Comics Library, which collects the best comics of the 1950s from the greatest mass market comic book publisher in history. Featured are: Corpse on the Imjin! by Harvey Kurtzman, et al.; Came the Dawn by Wallace “Wally” Wood, Al Feldstein, et al.; 50 Girls 50 by Al Williamson, Al Feldstein, et al.; and 'Tain’t the Meat... It’s the Humanity! by Jack Davis, Al Feldstein, et al. A great gift for Father’s Day or for the genre fiction fan in your life!

"EC Comics' output of crime, horror, and war comics have been reprinted and collected multiple times, but never like in Fantagraphics' new 'EC Comics Library,' which repackages some of the most influential comics ever published in writer/artist-driven volumes, printed in black and white.” – The A.V. Club

"The EC Comics Library collections display the grace of cartooning." – The Chicago Tribune

"Fantagraphics has been inventing unique ways to publish [this] treasure trove of '40s and '50s crime, horror and war comics." – The Toronto Star

View Video & Photo Slideshow Preview in New Window



Bomb Run and Other Stories (The EC Comics Library) by John Severin - Cover Uncovered
Written by Mike Baehr | Filed under Will ElderJohn SeverinHarvey KurtzmanEC ComicsComing Attractions 10 Feb 2014 4:36 PM

Bomb Run and Other Stories (The EC Comics Library) by John Severin

John Severin produced some of the finest war comics ever drawn during his long, distinguished, and versatile career, and working in collaboration with other greats like Harvey Kurtzman and Will Elder, his work in the genre for EC Comics is unmissable. Lucky for you, we've gathered all of that material together for the first time in a single volume under this handsome cover. Bomb Run and Other Stories is just off to the printer, is available for pre-order, and launches in July. Keep it tuned for more previews.

The EC Comics Slipcase Vol. 1 - Box Art
Written by Mike Baehr | Filed under Wallace WoodJack DavisHarvey KurtzmanEC ComicsComing AttractionsAl Williamson 4 Feb 2014 2:42 PM

EC Slipcase Vol. 1 box art

EC Slipcase Vol. 1 box art

Here's a clearer view of the box art for The EC Comics Slipcase Vol. 1, coming in April, featuring the artwork of Jack DavisHarvey KurtzmanAl Williamson, and Wallace Wood on the outside and their respective EC Comics Library volumes inside. Nice, right? That's gold ink on there, as befitting the quality of the material inside and the luster of our unique and impeccable presentation.

For those of you who plan on replacing your standalone copies of each book with the box set (since we're not able to offer empty boxes), might we suggest "paying it forward" by donating your duplicate books to a good cause such as your local library, or passing them along as gifts? Share the EC love!

The EC Comics Slipcase Vol. 1

The EC Comics Slipcase Vol. 1 - First Look
Written by Mike Baehr | Filed under Wallace WoodJack DavisHarvey KurtzmanEC ComicsComing AttractionsAl WilliamsonAl Feldstein 14 Jan 2014 5:13 PM

The EC Comics Slipcase Vol. 1 photo

The EC Comics Slipcase Vol. 1 photo

The printer sent us this handmade sample of our 4-volume EC Comics Slipcase Vol. 1 (which contains Corpse on the ImjinCame the Dawn50 Girls 50 and 'Tain't the Meat... It's the Humanity!) for our inspection. We caught one design error (first person to spot it gets a no-prize), which we fixed, and now the boxes are getting printed up, the sets will be assembled & shrinkwrapped, and the whole shebang will hit shelves in April. Pretty darn handsome, huh? It's a good deal, too, saving you over $20 versus buying the volumes separately and sans box. (Sorry, we're not going to be able to offer empty slipcases.) Hey, why not pre-order one for yourself or a favorite person?

Spring-Summer 2014, part 3: O say can you EC?
Written by Mike Baehr | Filed under Wallace WoodJoe OrlandoJack DavisHarvey KurtzmanEC ComicsComing AttractionsAl WilliamsonAl Feldstein 8 Nov 2013 5:46 PM

Since we're asking you to support our Spring-Summer 2014 season on Kickstarter (and you're coming through in spades so far!), we thought we'd spotlight the books in question, a couple at a time. We've also put our season catalog online for you to browse. (Please note that all artwork, contents, prices, specs, and release dates are preliminary and subject to change.)

Judgment Day prelim cover

Judgment Day and Other Stories (The EC Comics Library)
by Joe OrlandoAl Feldstein, Ray Bradbury et al.

184-page black & white 7.25" x 10.25" hardcover • $28.99
ISBN: 978-1-60699-727-7

EC Comics LogoJoe Orlando was a mainstay at EC, especially on science fiction, and this collects 23 of his best sci-fi stories. All of them, most scripted by Al Feldstein, serve up classic O. Henry-style endings, such as “I, Robot,” and “Fallen Idol.” The title story is one of EC’s most famous, with its blunt anti-racism message. When it was printed during the era of the Comics Code, publisher Bill Gaines and Feldstein had to fight to keep the story’s final panel “reveal” (and thus its whole point) intact. It was a pyrrhic victory, however, as “Judgment Day” became the last story in the last comic book EC published. This volume also features two of Orlando’s outstanding adaptations of classic Ray Bradbury science-fiction stories: “The Long Year” and “Outcast of the Stars.” Also included are all of EC’s “Adam Link” adaptations, a series which was later adapted for The Outer Limits TV show featuring Leonard Nimoy.

The EC Comics Slipcase Vol. 1 prelim cover

The EC Comics Slipcase Vol. 1
by Harvey Kurtzman, Wallace Wood, Al Feldstein, Al Williamson, Jack Davis, et al.

four black & white hardcover volumes in a 7.5" x 10.5" boxed set, 832 pages • $94.99
ISBN: 978-1-60699-728-4 

EC Comics LogoA boxed set of our first four books in our acclaimed EC Comics Library, which collects the best comics of the 1950s from the greatest mass market comic book publisher in history. Featured are: Corpse on the Imjin! by Harvey Kurtzman, et al.; Came the Dawn by Wallace “Wally” Wood, Al Feldstein, et al.; 50 Girls 50 by Al Williamson, Al Feldstein, et al.; and 'Tain’t the Meat... It’s the Humanity! by Jack Davis, Al Feldstein, et al. A great gift for Father’s Day or for the genre fiction fan in your life!

"EC Comics' output of crime, horror, and war comics have been reprinted and collected multiple times, but never like in Fantagraphics' new 'EC Comics Library,' which repackages some of the most influential comics ever published in writer/artist-driven volumes, printed in black and white.” – The A.V. Club

"The EC Comics Library collections display the grace of cartooning." – The Chicago Tribune

"Fantagraphics has been inventing unique ways to publish [this] treasure trove of '40s and '50s crime, horror and war comics." – The Toronto Star



The Comics Journal Library Volume 8: The EC Artists - First Look
Written by Mike Baehr | Filed under Will ElderThe Comics JournalJohnny CraigJohn SeverinJoe KubertHarvey KurtzmanGeorge EvansEC ComicsAl JaffeeAl Feldstein 25 Sep 2013 2:32 PM

TCJ Library 8: The EC Artists cover

TCJ Library 8 pages

TCJ Library 8 pages

From the editorial offices of The Comics Journal comes the latest TCJ Library edition, The Comics Journal Library Vol. 8: The EC Artists (Part 1)! This hefty oversized book, edited by TCJ co-editor Michael Dean, includes feature-length interviews with Will Elder, Bill Gaines, Al FeldsteinJohnny Craig, Frank Frazetta, Joe KubertHarvey Kurtzman, George Evans, Al Jaffee, and John Severin — some from the pages of TCJ, some from other sources, some expanded from previous appearances, and some published here for the first time! Together they form the first part (yes, there will be a Part 2) of a wide-ranging oral history of the greatest mainstream comic book publisher, amply illustrated in black & white and color. The perfect companion to our EC Comics Library series and a must for any EC fan or student of comics history!

Stand by for more sneak peeks, and reserve your copy by pre-ordering now for delivery in November (subject to change).

Daily OCD 5/2/13
Written by Jen Vaughn | Filed under Zippy the PinheadTom KaczynskiSteve DitkoSpain RodriguezspainRichard SalaPeanutsNoah Van SciverNico VassilakisMoto HagioMort MeskinMichael KuppermanLinda MedleyLilli CarréLeslie SteinLast VispoJulia GfrörerJosh SimmonsJim WoodringJames RombergerJacques BoyreauJack DavisHarvey KurtzmanGuy PeellaertGilbert HernandezEd PiskorEC ComicsDavid WojnarowiczDash ShawDaily OCDCrockett JohnsonCrag Hillcomics journalChuck ForsmanCarol TylerBill GriffithBarnabyAl WilliamsonAbstract Comics 2 May 2013 10:33 AM

The tantric release of Online Commentaries & Release:

Julio's Day

• Review: The LA Times and Noel Murray interviews Gilbert Hernandez about Julio's Day, Marble Season (from D&Q), plus the future books Love and Rockets: New Stories #6 and Maria M. LA Times: Gilbert says " ‘Julio’s Day’ is very simple. I mean, there’s a lot of heavy stuff going on, but I wanted it to read like a very simple, direct story."

• Interview: comiXology interviews Gilbert Hernandez about his most recent comic Julio's Day on their podcast.

• Review: Tom Spurgeon looks at Gilbert Hernandez's latest work, Julio's Day, on the Comics Reporter. "I found Julio's Day moving at times, again for reasons I'm not really certain I can fully articulate. The idea that we may be known as much for the choices of those around us and things that happen in proximity to ourselves as much as if not more than by the choices we make is either the ultimate comfort or the first back-of-throat rumblings of an existential howl."

• Plug: Julio's Day by Gilbert Hernandez is listed as one Amazon's Best Books of the Month

• Plug: Publishers Weekly lists Julio's Day as a pick of the week: "A marvelous and tightly scripted epic whose last page is a heart-stopper."

Review: Charles Hatfield of The Comics Journal flips through Julio's Day by Gilbert Hernandez. "When it comes to Beto, the lightning keeps striking, and if it doesn’t strike exactly the same place twice, it does testify to the same divided genius…It is the great lost Beto comic, belatedly given new form and new life.

• Review: Grovel's Andy Shaw reads Julio's Day by Gilbert Hernandez. "Just buy it now. This is Gilbert Hernandez at his finest, distilling a lifetime into a single volume of pleasure and pain. Julio’s Day is a literary classic, and another incredible piece of work from a true master of comics."

• Plug: Largehearted Boy plugs Julio's Day. "Gilbert compresses the history of the 20th century as well as the life of a man into a riveting, masterful story," writes Benn Ray.

• Plug (audio): Julio's Day is discussed on Daily Rios

The Adventures of Jodelle

• Review: The A.V. Club looks at The Adventures of Jodelle by Guy Peellaert. "The essays-which at 80 pages take up more of the book than Jodelle-are this volume's real selling point... Peellaert foregrounded the eroticism of advertising, and exposed how pulp imagery affects the public's understanding of everything from politics to gender. And he did it without resorting to polemics. The Adventures Of Jodelle book-both the comic strip and the supplemental material-is a delight both visually and intellectually," writes Noel Murray.

• Plug: Largehearted Boy plugs The Adventures of Jodelle by Guy Peellaert. "Think of Barbarella animated in that Yellow Submarine style and you get the idea of what Jodelle's adventures look like. This is comics as art."

• Plug: Comics Worth Reading plugs The Adventures of Jodelle by Guy Peellaert vis a vis a photo of ME holding it. Eat your heart out, actually eat Jodelle - with your eyes.

The Last Vispo

• Plug: Angel House Press is celebrated National Poetry Month with a focus on visual poetry, inspired by latest collection of it The Last Vispo, edited by Nico Vassilakis and Crag Hill. Check here for a month of visual poetry.

50 Girls 50

• Review: Heroes Complex at the LA Times looks at 50 Girls 50 by Al Williamson. Noel Murray writes, "These pieces are classic EC: punchy, knowing and ironic in the best sense of the word, in that they force readers to examine their own expectations. The best stories in '50 Girls 50 have readers rooting for heels, or celebrating war, all while framing the situation in such a way that readers question their responses." In reference to the whole EC Comics Library line, Murray writes, "All of these books are essential purchases for comics fans, but for those on a budget who are looking to prioritize…These are the books that best show off how EC took genre stories seriously, striving to create comics that didn’t treat readers as naive or ignorant."

• Plug: Boing Boing mentions our EC books, 50 Girls 50 and 'Tain't the Meat so you should probably buy them. "Fantagraphics released two beautiful hardbound books that collect the work of two of their superstars: Al Williamson and Jack Davis. The reproduction quality is superb," writes Mark Frauenfelder.

• Review: Fangoria reviews the next two EC books. Rick Trembles enjoys 'Tain't the Meat by Jack Davis. "Jack Davis’ dark comedic touch is all over this collection, diffusing the ghastly nature of the stories somewhat, an aspect to his work that was obviously lost on his opponents." Meanwhile with Al Willliamson's 50 Girls 50, Trembles writes "here we’re dazzled by romanticized sci-fi heroics and delicate line-work of the ilk of FLASH GORDON’S original artist Alex Raymond, Williamson’s main inspiration. Dinosaurs, spaceships, and outlandish otherworldly creatures populate the flora of faraway worlds, accompanied by buxom, exotically garbed beauties."

• Review: Nick Gazin sets his VICE sights on 'Tain't the Meat by Jack Davis. "Even though he wasn't a perfectionist, Jack Davis's laziness is better than most people's best work. When Davis does invest himself in a drawing it's just a mind bender. This is a must have for anyone who loves horror, EC, Jack Davis, any of that stuff."

The Dingburg Diaries

• Interview (audio): Beginnings with Wrestling Team interviews Bill Griffith about underground comix up to his most recent release,  Zippy: The Dingberg Diaries.

• Plug: Weird Universe highlights Zippy: The Dingberg Diaries on their site after Paul interviewed Bill Griffith at MoCCA 2013.

• Plug: Comics to find at MoCCA listed on AM New York. Zippy: The Dingburg Diaries and 50 Girls 50 are on the list of books to check out.

3 New Stories New School

• Review: Comics Bulletin looks at 3 New Stories from Dash Shaw. "This is a short, floppy-sized comic, but it's incredibly rich in complexity and depth. Shaw delivers an amazing collection of stories here."

• Interview: DigBoston and Clay Fernald talk to Dash Shaw about 3 New Stories, New School, Bottomless Belly Button and more. Shaw says, "Words and pictures are very different. They don't sit comfortably next to each other. Some cartoonists try to bring them closer together. Ware is like that. I like that space between things. I want the differences between things to be activated."

• Plug: Largehearted Boy hosts Atomic Books look at new comics included 3 New Stories. "Dash Shaw is a modern comics master. He experiments with everything from structure to narrative to color. If you're unfamiliar with his work, he's sort of like Gary Panter illustrating a Chris Ware story, or, in this case, 3 stories of dystopian societies," writes Benn Ray from Atomic Books.

Beta Testing the Apocalypse 7 Miles a Second

• Review: Nerds of a Feather enjoys Tom Kaczynski's Beta Testing the Apocalypse. Beta Philippe Duhart states "The thin lines, sharp angles, and rigid geometry…brings a clarity and simplicity that expertly balances the abstractness of the themes at the heart of Beta Testing the Apocalypse…One doesn’t need to have read Žižek to grasp Beta Testing’s themes and criticisms. One only needs to have only gone apartment hunting."

• Interview: Comics Bulletin and Keith Silve interview James Romberger and Marguerite Van Cook on 7 Miles A Second. Van Cook remembers, "David was a poet of the soul, there was always a tension between beauty and the vileness of what society did to anyone who was not of the mainstream. I once asked him what he did with the money he got from hustling when he was so young and he told me he would take a bus to the country and walk around. We thought it was so ironic that selling one's body and selling art had many of the same qualities. We laughed rather darkly, about how the body and art are commodified and priced so arbitrarily."

• Review: Publishers Weekly podcast looks at 7 Miles a Second in the time after MoCCA.

You'll Never Know: Book 3 The Heart of Thomas

• Interview (video): Back in January, Carol Tyler spoke to University of Southern California Provost's Professor Henry Jenkins and students as part of the USC Visions and Voices series. Mike Lynch was good enough to blog about it as soon as USC put up on the internet. She speaks about personal life and drawing comics, including the You'll Never Know series.

• Plug: Manga Bookshelf lists its first quarter favorites of 2013 and include Moto Hagio's newest book. "The Heart of Thomas was my most eagerly anticipated manga of the year, and while its January release date set the bar perhaps unfairly high for the year to come, I can’t bring myself to be sad about that."

Castle Waiting Vol 2 Definitive  Castle Waiting Vol. 1

• Review: Comics Worth Reading pulls out the Castle Waiting Vol. 2: Definitive Edition by Linda Medley. Johanna Draper Carlson writes "…it’s engrossing and beautifully drawn. I was surprised, reading the whole thing at once, how much of what figures in the final chapters was mentioned very early on. It gave me new appreciation for Medley’s long-term storytelling."

• Review: Calgary Public Library's Teen Blog speaks out on Castle Waiting Vol. 1 and 2 by Linda Medley. Adrienne writes, "Castle Waiting is a great comic book that takes elements from fairytales such as 'Sleeping Beauty' and combines them with a good dose of humour and plots about bearded ladies, two-headed girls, pregnancy and hidden libraries..I highly recommend her"

• Review: Strange Journal reviews Castle Waiting. "I’ve really fallen for it, it’s what they’d call a triple threat in show business: It can sing, dance AND act…In the tradition of Jeff Smith’s Bone and the better parts of Dave Sim’s Cerebus, Medley has conjured an amazing and beautiful world and filled it with flawed, interesting folks eking out their existence in a castle on the edge of the world," states Adam Blodgett.

Tales Designed to Thrizzle Vol.2 Delphine

• Interview: Slice Radio interviews Michael Kupperman on life and Tales Designed to Thrizzle Vol. 2

• Review: Delphine by Richard Sala is reviewed on Comics Bulletin. Jason Sacks "We're used to fairy tales telling the story of a journey by a girl from innocence to the real world. Delphine inverts the gender of those classic tales, but uses those familiar tropes to tell a familiar story. Richard Sala treads a world of metaphor and allusion, a world that feels as familiar as Grimm's Fairy Tales and as mysterious as our own heart." 

Out of the Shadows Barnaby

• Review: Nick Gazin sets his VICE sights on Out of the Shadows by Mort Meskin (edited by Steven Brower). "Shadows everywhere. The stories are just a lot of old timey chatter where people call each other chum and stuff but the compositions and choices that Mort Meskin made are pretty sophisticated."

• Interview: The Comics Journal posts an article titled Crockett Johnson and the Invention of Barnaby. Philip Nel writes about it all including the creation of fairy godfather, Mr. O'Malley's favorite catchphrase. Barnaby is coming so soon, we'll all cry "Cushlamochree!"

Impossible Tales: The Steve Ditko Archives Vol. 4   Messages in a Bottle

• Review: iFanboy hypes up Impossible Tales: The Steve Ditko Archives Vol. 4 (by Steve Ditko and edited by Blake Bell) coming out this May. Josh Christie states: "Steve Ditko is one of those guys you could picture on the Mount Rushmore of comics creators…Like so many of the great comics from the 1950s, the drug-fueled, macabre scenes look more like something out of an alternate dimension rather than from the states’ apple pie and bubblegum past."

• Review: Arkham Comics reviews Messages in a Bottle by B. Krigstein (edited by Greg Sadowski). A rough translation states, "Messages in a Bottle is a magical book, a timeless and stunning clarity: a lesson in comics as we do not meet every day."

The Hypo Heads or Tails The End of the Fucking World

• Review: Noah Van Sciver's The Hypo is reviewed on We Read Comics "Sciver absolutely nails it…We see Lincoln's plain spoken style, his humbleness, his self-doubt, and his honesty here with so much fucking economy and elegance."

• Interview: Noah Van Sciver appears on Comic Impact to talk about The Hypo and his newest comics project. 

• Review: Lilli Carré's Heads or Tails is reviewed on French podcast Dans ta bulle.

• Plug: The End of the Fucking World (Spoiler alert!) on The Chemical Box. "Similar to Derf’s analysis of Jeffery Dahmer in 'My Friend Dahmer', you can see James (along with Dahmer) struggling with their basic instincts."

Black is the Color Hip Hop Family Tree Eye of the Majestic Creature

• Plug: The Beat waxes on about Julia Gfrörer and Black is the Color. Zainab Akhtar writes, "Gfrorer’s work is consistently excellent, featuring themes of myth, folk lore, mysticism and spirituality, coupled with her fine-lined, evocative art." 

• Plug: Demencha calls Ed Piskor a Hip Hop Archeologist and more in reference to Hip Hop Famiy Tree. "His classic indie comic composition and narrative ease make the strip readable, informative (who knew Rammelzee went tagging with Basquiat?), and respectful to the art forms and artists it covers," writes J.P. McNamara.

• Review: In an oddly religious review, Mirrors of Christ looks at Eye of the Majestic Creature by Leslie Stein. "Sadly in this story the lyre (guitar) did not participate in the worship of God but in the desire of the flesh."

Sexytime The Furry Trap

• Review: Orgasm reviews Sexytime edited by Jacques Boyreau. "…if you want an oversized coffee-book that your guests might enjoying flipping through the pages as you bring refreshments, Sexytime is for you. And hey, it might even get you laid."

• Review: Josh Simmons' story from The Furry Trap, 'Mark of the Bat' is reviewed on Vorptalizer. Seat T. Collins comments, " 'Mark of the Bat' picks and picks and picks at our dovetailed drive for cruelty and need to feel superior to others until the fingernail tears off. It leaves a mark." 

Frank ipad  The Comics Joural Abstract Comics

• Plug: Comics Workbook enjoys reading The Portable Frank digitally thanks to comiXology.Leah writes, "Woodring’s way of transitioning images between panels (in, ya know, a pretty trippy way) lends itself really well to the panel by panel viewing of the digital reader."

• Plug: Tucker Stone mentions the new issue of The Comics Journal on the Comics Journal, not trying to get to incestuous. "The new issue of the Journal is pretty good; the Tardi interview is great."

• Plug: Textures of Ether looks at Abstract Comics. "Do Abstract Comics artists need to be aware of comics history?…Molotiu’s articles explore the theory behind Abstract Comics and are always interesting to read. They would make a welcome addition to any future AC anthology."

Cruisin' with the Hound

• Review: Nick Gazin checks out Cruisin' with the Hound by Spain Rodriguez on VICE. "Spain's comics always feel lively and real and there's this sense that he was probably too cool to be making comics but somehow he was. You can tell he was for real because he put the most energy into drawing motorcycles and cars and his people always look kinda like they're secondary to their machines. Great book from a great artist and story teller."

• Plug: Musical notation in Peanuts is analyzed on the Hooded Utilitarian. "In this sense, Schulz again collapses into Charlie Brown — locked out of high art virtuosity and romantic opportunities, disappointed in art as in love.…Schulz has, perhaps, found a way to invert Lichtenstein," writes Noah Berlatsky. 
 
• Plug (video): Al Jaffee and Robert Grossman are interviewed on the Imperium about the Harvey Kurtzman retrospective at the Society of Illustrators. Jaffee states, "His concepts were, to us at the time, revolutionary because he was breaking the third or the fourth wall, whatever you want to call it."

• Plug: And finally, Peanuts and Persian literature.

Daily OCD 3/26/13
Written by Jen Vaughn | Filed under William S BurroughsWalt KellyWally WoodPeter BaggePaul NelsonNoah Van SciverLeslie SteinKevin AveryJanet HamlinJames RombergerHarvey KurtzmanEd PiskorEC ComicsDavid WojnarowiczDash ShawDaily OCDBlake BellBill Everett 26 Mar 2013 7:58 PM

The tallest seedlings of Online Commentaries & Diversions:

Dash Shaw

• Review: ForeWord looks at Dash Shaw's New School. "Like its predecessors, New School is unlike everything else out there.…It’s a startling, yet aptly mundane vision of one man’s future, made all the more believable by Shaw’s expressive, cartoony drawings and generally solid scripting…ultimately, it’s an entertaining and thoughtful graphic novel," writes Bill Baker.

The Lost Art of Ah Pook Observed While Falling

• Review: Paraphilia Magazine covers the two Malcolm McNeill books about his collaborations with William S. Burroughs. "Observed While Falling is an invaluable addition to the library of any Burroughs fan…Having shed light on a previously dark corner of the Burroughs legacy, will hopefully provide vital research material for critical analysis of this gravely neglected work produced during a largely overlooked period in his career," writes Edward S. Robinson. The Lost Art of Ah Pook enchants, "Mc Neill’s images – they’re more than mere illustrations – are rich, complex, and often very strange indeed. Disturbed and disturbing…Mc Neill’s large-form images are remarkable works of art…throughout the quality of Mc Neill’s draftsmanship is of a rare standard."
 
 Pogo Vol. 1 Pogo Vol. 2

• Review: Comics Worth Reading recommends Pogo Vol. 1 and Vol. 2 by Walt Kelly. "These upscale volumes collecting the classic Pogo comic strip are archival quality, beautifully reproduced and a pleasure to look upon…Pogo is well-loved for a reason. The strips are beautifully drawn and keenly observent of human nature."

Sketching Guantanamo

• Interview (audio): Janet Hamlin is interviewed by Anna Maria Tremonti on CBC Radio show, The Current, about working on Sketching Guantanamo and being at the courtroom trials. "What I'm working on that day is determined by whatever activity is in court…"
 
Peter Bagge's Other Stuff
 
• Review (audio): Brian Heater is a guest on Bullseye with Jesse Thorn and brings up Peter Bagge's Other Stuff. Heater gabs, "…the iconic underground cartoonist of the 90s, anything depicted a slacker or the grunge era was probably by Bagge. Other Stuff has an overly cartoony look that is nicely juxtaposed by true-to-life stories…"
 
Hip Hop Family Tree
 
• Interview (video): Ed Piskor is interviewed by Jared Gardner during his Columbus Museum of Art Residency and speaks on his life through comics and Hip Hop Family Tree. "I grew up in just a hip hop environment, my house was the nucleus between three parks in town you could go to any given one and see some hip hop going on, rudimentary stuff …a few slabs of linoleum and a boombox," answered Piskor.

The Hypo

• Review: ConSequential reviewed The Hypo by Noah Van Sciver recently. "Van Sciver’s depiction is sufficiently sympathetic as to make the reader really root for him as he struggles against rival suitors, Mary’s family and his own anxious temperament. …the fact that it’s endearing, engaging and an all-round good read should make it your kind of thing as well," writes Lucy Boyes.

7 Miles a Second

• Plug: Our Man in Boston profiles David Wojnarowicz and 7 Miles a Second. "Artists James Romberger and Marguerite Van Cook vividly depict David Wojnarowicz’s life and struggles in a much improved edition…" says Robert Birnbaum.

Eye of the Majestic Creature Beta Testing the Apocalypse

• Plug: Eye of the Majestic Creature's Leslie Stein is interview about her band and answers a few questions about her comics too on Audiofemme.

• Review: Grovel reads Beta Testing the Apocalypse by Tom Kaczynski. "Anyone that likes the exploration of ideas, particularly the relationship between humanity, geography, architecture and technology, might get a kick out of reading something different, especially presented in such an unusual form," writes Andy Shaw. 

Corpse on the Imjin! Came the Dawn  

•Review: MetroPulse checks out the EC Library Comics from Wallace Wood and Harvey Kurtzman. "EC had no fear of getting political, long before comics 'grew up.'…Fantagraphics’ EC Comics Library is a must-own for anyone who considers themselves a serious comics fan." Corpse on the Imjin! is "Thoroughly researched and meticulously detailed, Kurtzman’s stories are grim stuff in an era when most Americans believed their country could do no wrong… Grade-school boys reading these dark tales at the time must have had their minds completely blown." Meanwhile, Wally Wood's Came the Dawn! "The tales here are mostly crowd-pleasers with the sort of twist endings that would later become a Twilight Zone trademark."

Everything is Afterthought: The Life and Writings of Paul Nelson

• Review: Everything is an Afterthought by Kevin Avery is examined in Caught by the River. Andy Childs says, "it becomes apparent that when the history of rock’n'roll is ever written as it should be then he, Nelson, will take his place as a pivotal and hugely influential figure…Kevin Avery does a masterly job in re-constructing Paul Nelson’s reputation and after the enthusiastic critique in the first half of the book the examples of his work in the second half do not disappoint at all."

 Adele Blanc-Sec Amazing Mysteries

• Review: Nick Gazin of Vice features two of our books in his recent Comic-Book Love-In. Spoiler warning on the Jacques Tardi's The Extraordinary Adventures of Adèle Blanc-Sec Vol. 2,  though."She scowls through her adventures…The drawings are very pretty, though." He continues on with Amazing Mysteries: The Bill Everett Archives Vol. 1, edited by Blake Bell."These are some crudely-drawn-but-often-pretty comics from the late 30s."