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Category >> Jaime Hernandez

Daily OCD: 3/31/10
Written by Mike Baehr | Filed under SethreviewsNewaveLove and RocketsJaime HernandezJacques TardiGilbert HernandezDaily OCDChris WareChip KiddCharles BurnsAl Columbia 31 Mar 2010 1:45 PM

Online Commentary & Diversions:

Love and Rockets Book 25: High Soft Lisp

Review: "The quality of [Gilbert] Hernandez's cartooning is unassailable. Part of the reason [High Soft Lisp] is so hard to quantify is his uncanny ability to shift focus on a moment's notice, effortlessly jumping from one character to another, suggesting whole thought processes and histories with just a handful of images." – Jason Michelitch, Comics Alliance

Pim & Francie: The Golden Bear Days

Review: "The sort of horror Columbia presents in Pim & Francie works even better without the trappings of recitation and the cause and effect on which they depend. This sort of dread-inducing fright functions without regard to the recognizable comforts of logic and the niceties of narration. This is visceral, elemental terror that generally festers below — or alongside invisibly — human reckoning. ... Frontwards, backways, sneak-a-peek sideways, it all packs a monumentally disturbing wallop." – Rich Kreiner, "Yearlong Best of the Year," The Comics Journal

Love and Rockets Library (Locas Book 4): Penny Century It Was the War of the Trenches

Plugs: The Gosh! Comics Blog highlights recent arrivals Penny Century by Jaime Hernandez ("This volume picks up right after Perla La Loca left off, beginning with the now out-of-print graphic novel Whoa Nellie! which is probably the best female wrestling comic in town") and It Was the War of the Trenches by Jacques Tardi ("Since only a fraction of Trenches was ever available to us English-speaking folk it’s a nice to see the whole lot of it in one place.")

Skin Deep [Softcover Ed.]

Panel: The Comics Journal presents the first part (of three) of a never-before-published panel discussion between Charles Burns , Chip Kidd, Seth and Chris Ware, moderated by Jeet Heer, that occurred October 29, 2005 at the International Festival of Authors in Toronto, Canada

Newave! The Underground Mini Comix of the 1980s

Interview: The Daily Cross Hatch 's Brian Heater, who says "Released late last month, Fantagraphics’ massive collection, Newave, has already made a strong case for its place on 2010’s list of most essential reissues," talks to the book's editor Michael Dowers: "I’ve always been into art and stuff, so I thought that [minicomics] would be fun to do. I used to do paintings, I did a bunch of wood carving, I built a few stringed instruments. I was always doing things with my hands. It wasn’t until I discovered minicomics that it just all came together. I never dreamed that, 30 years later, I would be writing a book about this stuff."

Now in stock: Penny Century: A Love and Rockets Book by Jaime Hernandez
Written by Mike Baehr | Filed under new releasesLove and RocketsJaime Hernandez 31 Mar 2010 6:36 AM

Just arrived in our warehouse and ready to ship:

Penny Century: A Love and Rockets Book by Jaime Hernandez

Penny Century: A Love and Rockets Book (Love and Rockets Library — Locas Book 4)
By Jaime Hernandez

240-page black & white 7.5" x 9.25" softcover • $18.99
ISBN: 978-1-60699-342-2
Add to CartMore Info & Previews

Picking up right after Perla La Loca, the third volume of the definitive “Maggie” series repackaging, this compilation of stories from Jaime Hernandez’s solo comic Penny Century and his subsequent return to Love and Rockets (Volume II) charts the further lives of his beloved “Locas.”

But first... wrestling! Penny Century starts off with a blast with “Whoa, Nellie!,” a unique graphic novelette in which Maggie, who has settled in with her pro-wrestler aunt for a while, experiences that wild and woolly world first-hand.

Then it’s back to chills and spills with the old cast of Hopey, Ray Dominguez, and Izzy Ortiz — including Maggie’s romantic dream fantasia “The Race” and the definitive Ray story, “Everybody Loves Me, Baby.”

Penny Century also features two major “flashback” stories: “Bay of Threes” finally reveals the full back story behind Beatriz “Penny Century” Garcia, Maggie’s long-time, bleached-blonde bombshell friend (who gives this volume its name and can be seen as a super-villainess in the first two issues of Love and Rockets: New Stories), while “Home School” is one of Hernandez’s popular looks at his characters’ lives from when they were little kids, drawn in an adorable simplified Dennis the Menace type style. This volume also includes the Maggie & Hopey Color Fun one-shot, reproduced here in glorious black and white.

Unsure how to build your Love and Rockets collection? See our handy guide on How to Read Love and Rockets.

Download an EXCLUSIVE 14-page PDF excerpt (823 KB).


New Comics Day 3/31/10
Written by Mike Baehr | Filed under New Comics DayLove and RocketsJaime HernandezJacques TardiJack ColeGilbert Hernandez 30 Mar 2010 11:00 PM

A heaping helping of Fantagraphics is due to arrive in comic shops this week. More info and your rundown of blogospheric plugs follows:

High Soft Lisp (Love and Rockets Book 25) by Gilbert Hernandez

High Soft Lisp (Love and Rockets Book 25)
By Gilbert Hernandez

144-page black & white 6.5" x 9.75" softcover • $16.99
ISBN: 978-1-60699-318-7

At Comics Alliance, Douglas Wolk calls it "The most riveting, chilling graphic novel I've read so far this year" and "a great, shockingly dark piece of work." At Comics Comics, Joe McCulloch describes this correctly as "the newest of Fantagraphics ‘classic’ line of tall(-ish), thin(ner) softcovers, an all-Beto book collecting short stories featuring the character Fritz." The Comics Reporter's Tom Spurgeon calls this and Penny Century below "Some of the best comics in the world..."

Penny Century: A Love and Rockets Book by Jaime Hernandez

Penny Century: A Love and Rockets Book (Love and Rockets Library — Locas Book 4)
By Jaime Hernandez

240-page black & white 7.5" x 9.25" softcover • $18.99
ISBN: 978-1-60699-342-2

This is "another 240-page entry in the short(er), fat(ter) line of catch-up-quick softcovers which you can promise yourself to, body and soul, in the hopes of an eventually comprehensive reading experience," says Comics Comics' Joe McCulloch, who also declares "my heart belongs to the 1996 miniseries Whoa, Nellie!, a leaner-than-usual action piece adoringly dotted with monolithic images of lady wrestlers in action – it’s like a superhero comic of the period, only just perfectly different enough." Douglas Wolk at Comics Alliance says "It's all great — I'm not sure Jaime could draw a bad comic if he tried..."

It Was the War of the Trenches by Jacques Tardi

It Was the War of the Trenches
by Jacques Tardi

120-page black & white 7.75" x 10.5" hardcover • $24.99
ISBN: 978-1-60699-353-8

At The Comics Reporter Tom Spurgeon declares "I'd say this is the release of the week: one of the great works from one of the great, important cartoonists." Comics Comics' Joe McCulloch says of Tardi "few artists possess dual OG certification with RAW and Heavy Metal" and calls the book "a human patchwork of WWI service, perhaps the artist’s keystone work." At Comics Alliance, Douglas Wolk describes it as "Tardi's ferocious graphic novel about the horrors of war in general and World War I in particular..." 

Classic Pin-Up Art of Jack Cole (Softcover Ed.) by Jack Cole;  edited by Alex Chun

Classic Pin-Up Art of Jack Cole (Softcover Ed.)
By Jack Cole; edited by Alex Chun

104-page b&w/color 7.5" x 10.25" softcover • $18.99
ISBN: 978-1-60699-284-5

Joe McCulloch sums it up at Comics Comics: "You may have missed this too, when Fantagraphics released it as a hardcover in 2004 – now these 104 pages of vintage Humorama digest illustrations won’t run you $78.99 new, if you believe Amazon sellers." Tom Spurgeon recalls that the original hardcover edition of this "was a really nice book" in his Comics Reporter recommendation.

Previews and information a-plenty can be had at the links above so you can gather knowledge before you gather your wallet and head out to your local shop.









Daily OCD: 3/23/10
Written by Mike Baehr | Filed under reviewsPopeyeMiss Lasko-GrossMatt ThornmangaLove and RocketsJules FeifferJaime HernandezJacques Tardihooray for HollywoodDaily OCDCarol TylerBest of 2009 23 Mar 2010 2:19 PM

Online Commentary & Diversions:

You'll Never Know Book 1: A Good and Decent Man

A Mess of Everything

List: Booklist's Ray Olson names the Top 10 Graphic Novels of the past 12 months, including You'll Never Know, Book 1: A Good and Decent Man by C. Tyler ("Alt-comics veteran Tyler fully demonstrates her artistry in a book about her father’s WWII experiences, her childhood and present struggles raising her daughter, and her growing realization of war’s long-term effects on soldiers and their families.") and A Mess of Everything by Miss Lasko-Gross ("With washed and faded and wildly varied artwork and writing that sounds utterly like a teen’s voice, Lasko-Gross makes high-schooler Melissa’s late-teen experience real enough to nip incipient nostalgia in the bud.")

Love and Rockets Library (Locas Book 4): Penny Century  [Pre-Order]

Review: "This charming collection of stories from the long-running and much acclaimed Love and Rockets explores friendship and romance through the interconnected experiences of several characters over many years. ... What's impressive about Hernandez's work isn't so much each story on its own as it is how all the pieces fit together into a whole world that's almost but not quite like our own. ... Hernandez's gorgeous art is both expressive and simple... It all comes together to construct a world and people easy to relate to." – Publishers Weekly

It Was the War of the Trenches [Pre-Order]

Review: "Tardi's work which is distinguished by an unstinting attention to locale and detail, captures the true horror of war in a way that no other artist has been quite able to achieve. ... [It Was the War of the Trenches] is the story of man against the system, with the system as the ultimate winner. This is a story for our times." – Peter Richardson (via ¡Journalista!)

Explainers: The Complete Village Voice Strips (1956-66) [2nd  Ed.]

Profile: Benjamin Ivry of Forward looks at the career of Jules Feiffer, who says "From my earliest cartoons, I’ve tried to work in front of audiences who may not be happy with what I’m saying. In the then left-wing Village Voice, I criticized the student left and they weren’t happy. I don’t find it fun to work before audiences who would agree with me; I prefer to challenge their preconceptions. My role is to push and prod and challenge, and I try to do it pleasantly rather than otherwise."

Interview: Big Think presents a multi-part video interview with Jules Feiffer

A Drunken Dream and Other Stories - Moto Hagio

Interview: Robot 6's Chris Mautner talks to Matt Thorn about editing our upcoming manga line: "My goal is to make a line that will appeal to the twenty-something Sailor Moon/Pokémon generation that feel they've outgrown the bulk of what is currently available, and that will also appeal to intelligent grown-ups who just enjoy a good read, but have never seen themselves as readers of manga, or even comics. I'd like to provide these people with smart, high-quality, accessible manga."

Popeye Vol. 1:

Hooray for Hollywood: That Popeye movie is going to be in 3D, will not co-star Supergirl

Things to see: 3/19/10
Written by Mike Baehr | Filed under Tom KaczynskiThings to seeJaime HernandezDebbie Drechsler 19 Mar 2010 6:29 PM

Daily clips & strips — click for improved viewing at the sources:

CBGB no. 1 - cover by Jaime Hernandez

• It's Jaime Hernandez's cover for the first issue of the CBGB comic — more info at Robot 6

cormorants courting - Debbie Drechsler

Cormorants a-courtin' by Debbie Drechsler

structure 0027

• Still digging these "structure" drawings by Tom Kaczynski

Skylight Books TV ad features Love and Rockets
Written by Mike Baehr | Filed under televisionLove and RocketsJaime Hernandezarbitrary cuteness 15 Mar 2010 10:45 PM

How do you know that L.A. independent bookstore Skylight Books is awesome (aside from the two magic words "independent bookstore" that is)? The fact that they feature closeups of Locas II AND kittycats in their new TV ad, that's how! (Via The Believer on Twitter.)

Things to see: 3/5/10
Written by Mike Baehr | Filed under Tom KaczynskiTim LaneThings to seeT Edward BakRobert GoodinRichard SalaRenee FrenchPaul HornschemeierJim FloraJaime HernandezDerek Van Gieson 5 Mar 2010 4:58 PM

Your daily art bloggery:

Yogi Bear - Robert Goodin

• Reminder: the Covered art show at Secret Headquarters opens tomorrow night! Here's a piece by show curator/organizer Robert Goodin as revealed on Steven Weissman's blog...

Beware - Richard Sala

• ...and Richard Sala posts his own contribution

Myth of Jack Theatre Presents Belligerent Piano - Tim Lane

Tim Lane's serialized strip Myth of Jack Theatre Presents: Belligerent Piano begins running this week in the St. Louis Riverfront Times and on Tim's blog

Management - Jim Flora

Corporate motivation, Jim Flora style, 1956

WSJ illustration - Paul Hornschemeier

Paul Hornschemeier on the Oscars for the WSJ, with process art on his blog

thewlis 2 - Renee French

Pucker up for some Renee French — and this one too, ooh

The Wasp - Jaime Hernandez

• You want a bunch of Jaime Hernandez superheroine sketches gathered all in one place? Scans Daily has you covered

House of Abstraction - Derek Van Gieson

Derek Van Gieson keeps up his feverish pace — can't go wrong with a cat in a suit

structure - Tom Kaczynski

Tom Kaczynski captioned this drawing "unnatural megalithic formation" — 'nuff said

Doctor Strange - T. Edward Bak

T. Edward Bak draws Dr. Strange??

Daily OCD: 2/24/10
Written by Mike Baehr | Filed under Steve DitkoreviewsPaul HornschemeierMomeLove and RocketsKim DeitchKevin HuizengaJoe SaccoJim WoodringJaime HernandezHotwireGary PanterDash ShawDaily OCDBlake BellBest of 2009 24 Feb 2010 1:54 PM

Neverending Online Commentary & Diversions:

Love and  Rockets Book 22: Ghost of Hoppers Love and Rockets Book 24: The Education of Hopey Glass

List: Only the Cinema's Ed Howard concludes counting down The Best Comics of the Decade: the top 20 includes "The Lute String" (available in Mome Vols. 9 & 10) by Jim Woodring at #16 ("It's moving, funny, and as with all of Woodring's work it demands a close reading"), Alias the Cat (originally The Stuff of Dreams) by Kim Deitch at #14 ("It's funny, goofy, exciting and far-ranging in its imaginative nonsense accumulations, and throughout it all Deitch's fond sense of nostalgia for a world that never quite was lends emotional heft to the story's elaborate twists and turns"), Dash Shaw's Bottomless Belly Button and Mome stories (collected in The Unclothed Man in the 35th Century A.D.) at #13 ("Dash Shaw is an utterly brilliant young cartoonist who has, in a few short years, advanced from the academic experiments of his earlier work... into a formalist genius whose skills encompass both a natural gift for color and a feel for subtle, indirect characterization"), Safe Area Gorazde by Joe Sacco at #7 ("Joe Sacco is a unique figure in modern comics: there is no one else who combines sheer cartooning chops with a newspaper reporter's sensibility and instincts in quite the same way. ... Safe Area Gorazde [is] an especially powerful document of the effects of war"), the comics of Kevin Huizenga at #4 ("Kevin Huizenga is the best young artist in comics. It's as simple as that. With his recent Fantagraphics series Ganges (part of the Ignatz line of high-quality pamphlets) Huizenga has matured into one of comics' finest formalists"), Jimbo in Purgatory by Gary Panter at #2 ("The denseness of Panter's references and cross-references makes the experience of reading this book a truly overwhelming experience; every line, every image, spirals into multiple other references and ideas, pulling in the whole wide expanse of world culture as a stomping ground for Jimbo's wanderings through the Purgatory of modern existence towards enlightenment"), and the Love and Rockets Vol. II work of Jaime Hernandez (as collected in Ghost of Hoppers and The Education of Hopey Glass) in the #1 slot ("There is no greater all-around artist in modern comics than Jaime Hernandez, and his recent work builds on his past successes so that his oeuvre as a whole is shaping up to be one of literature's best sustained stories about aging and the shifting of relationships over the course of a life").

Hotwire Comics Vol. 3

Review: "The best argument that the underground tradition is still alive is Hotwire Comics, edited by Glen Head (one of the most underrated cartoonists around, incidentally). Hotwire Comics is a visual assault, abrasive, confrontational, willing to poke and prod the audience: a real live wire that can shock. Everything a good underground comic book should be." – Jeet Heer, Comics Comics

Strange  Suspense: The Steve Ditko Archives Vol. 1

Review: "Strange Suspense is a handsome book generally, with a fun front cover and a nice, sturdy, feel. As far as my eye can tell the work is reproduced well; admittedly, I have one of the worst eyes in comics for that sort of thing. It's nice to have a bunch of comics from this time period, particularly the grittier pre-Code or Fear of Code-Like Crackdown work. There are some truly repulsive pieces of throwaway pulp in this book's pages, and Ditko was more than up to the task of illustrating them." – Tom Spurgeon, The Comics Reporter

Mother, Come Home [New Hardcover Edition]

Review: "Mother, Come Home is a subtle, dark story about death and madness and fantasy, tied together by symbols and the voice of an older Thomas looking back on his childhood. It's not bleak, though; Thomas survives his traumatic childhood, and perhaps Hornschmeier's lesson is that we all can, if we try — if we step outside our rituals and fantasies and reach out to each other, we can make it through." – Andrew Wheeler, The Antick Musings of G.B.H. Hornswoggler, Gent. (via ¡Journalista!)

Jaime Hernandez at UTEP tonight!
Written by Mike Baehr | Filed under Love and RocketsJaime Hernandezevents 23 Feb 2010 1:50 PM

Texas - Jaime Hernandez

Last minute notice! Jaime Hernandez will be giving a keynote address at University of Texas El Paso's second-annual “El Paso in the Comics” event, at 7 PM tonight! More info here. (Via The Comics Reporter)

Daily OCD: 2/9/10
Written by Mike Baehr | Filed under reviewsPeter BaggePeanutsMomeLove and RocketsLos Bros HernandezLinda MedleyJordan CraneJoe DalyJaime HernandezGilbert HernandezDaily OCDCharles M SchulzBest of 2009Abstract Comics 9 Feb 2010 4:15 PM

Online Commentary & Diversions:

List: At The Comics Journal, the back half of Rob Clough's Top 50 Comics of 2009 includes:

#29, The Complete Peanuts 1971-1972 by Charles Schulz: "Twenty-two years into his run on this strip, Schulz was still at his peak even as Peanuts was moving into a new phase."

#31, Mome Vol. 14: "The most consistently excellent anthology in comics, issue after issue."

#39, Uptight #3 (misidentified as #2) by Jordan Crane: "Both [stories] were perfectly suited for this lo-fi yet gorgeously designed comic..."

#43, The Red Monkey Double Happiness Book by Joe Daly: "Daly didn’t create just a story or a set of characters, but an entire community for readers to wander around in and become comfortable with. Equal parts Tintin and The Big Lebowski, this was a stoner detective story, with all sorts of absurd events popping up in everyday life and eventually making a kind of sense."

#46, Everybody Is Stupid Except for Me by Peter Bagge: "This is Bagge-as-Mencken, trenchantly tearing apart stupid ideas from both the left and the right and doing it while actually going out into the field, gathering facts, and talking to people. His hyper-expressive style was a perfect fit for his over-the-top political commentary."

And finally, #50, Love and Rockets: New Stories #2 by Gilbert & Jaime Hernandez: "Jaime’s conclusion to 'Ti-Girls Adventures' managed to combine rip-snorting action and compelling character work. Gilbert’s 'Hypnotwist' was both a callback to his New Love-style weirdness and yet another entry in his 'pulp movie' adaptations. ...[I]t’s clear both brothers were having such a good time following their impulses."

Review: "Abstract Comics: The title is, in itself, a manifesto. It makes official the existence of these strange objects that some will reject as a contradiction in terms: 'abstract comics.' ... In the abstract comics gathered by Molotiu, sequential ordering produces nothing on the order of a story; but solidarity between the panels is established (in more or less convincing and seducing fashions) in another mode — plastic, rhythmic and so to speak musical. Personally, I do not refuse to make a place for these creations in the field of comics, because I wish that field to be as open and as diversified in its expressions as possible, without excluding anything a priori. Nevertheless, I still note that they have closer affinities with the operating modes of contemporary art that with the ordinary ambitions of drawn literatures." – Thierry Groensteen, Neuvieme Art (excerpt and translation by Andrei Molotiu at the Abstract Comics Blog)

Review: "Perhaps the best adjective I could employ to describe Castle Waiting would be 'homey.' It’s all about the pleasures of home and the relief of being amongst family who accept you, even if they don’t happen to be related to you or even entirely human. ... Taken on the surface, it’s a perfectly cozy and enjoyable story. If one decides to delve more deeply, themes of tolerance and equality can be found gently at work, though by no means do they take precedence over the characters. Lest all of this sound a bit too quaintly domestic, let me assure you that the story is also quite funny." – Michelle Smith, Soliloquy in Blue