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Peanuts Every Sunday: 1956-1960 (Vol. 2)
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Walt Disney's Uncle Scrooge and Donald Duck: Return to Plain Awful (The Don Rosa Library Vol. 2) [U.S./CANADA ONLY - Pre-Order]
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Category >> James Romberger

Fantagraphics at CAB 2014 Teaser
Written by Jen Vaughn | Filed under Tim LaneOlivier SchrauwenMarguerite Van CookJames RombergerDash Shawart shows 16 Oct 2014 2:01 PM
CAB
Here's a sweet look at the poster for free convention Comic Arts Brooklyn coming up on Saturday and Sunday, November 8-9th! We'll have special guests like Olivier SchrauwenTim Lane (who busted out this poster) Dash ShawMarguerite Van Cook, James Romberger, Anne Ishii and more... DETAILS SOON.


The Late Child and Other Animals by Marguerite Van Cook and James Romberger - Video/Photo Slideshow
Written by Sonia Lei | Filed under previewsMarguerite Van CookJames RombergerComing Attractions 15 Oct 2014 11:30 AM

The Late Child and Other Animals
by Marguerite Van Cook and James Romberger

180-page color 8" x 10" hardcover • $29.99
ISBN: 978-1-60699-789-5

Ships in: November 2014 (subject to change) — Pre-Order Now

Hetty survives the bombing of Portsmouth by the Nazis in World War II, only to learn that her soldier husband — with whom she was in the process of adopting a young daughter — has been killed on the way back home from North Africa. She must then complete the adoption alone. A decade later, she gives birth to a bastard daughter, Marguerite. Now Hetty must go before a tribunal to prove that she is a fit mother — or possibly lose both her children. From there, The Late Child and Other Animals tells the story of little Marguerite's childhood in the recovering British naval port and the rural beauty of the Isle of Wight and in Normandy, France. The journeys and struggles over decades of this mother and daughter are linked in five episodes that veer between lyricism, wry wit, and harrowing suspense.

The Late Child and Other Animals is an original graphic novel, a generational autobiography written by legendary punk diva and award-winning poet Marguerite Van Cook, adapted by artist James Romberger, the creator of the Eisner-nominated Post York. The team of Romberger and Van Cook is also responsible for the adaptation and art of 7 Miles a Second, their critically acclaimed graphic memoir collaboration with the late multimedia artist and AIDS activist, David Wojnarowicz.

View Video & Photo Slideshow in New Window



The Late Child and Other Animals by Marguerite Van Cook and James Romberger - Excerpt
Written by Sonia Lei | Filed under previewsMarguerite Van CookJames RombergerComing Attractions 6 Oct 2014 12:00 PM

In the opening pages of The Late Child and Other Animals, a new biographical memoir out from acclaimed artists and powerhouse duo Marguerite Van Cook and James Romberger, Van Cook's mother Hetty navigates the ruins of Portsmouth, where Nazi bombings have destroyed buildings and started fires. Meanwhile, her husband Fred—with whom she has decided to adopt a child—is stationed somewhere in North Africa.

You can read and download the full 17-page (10.2 MB) excerpt here. We'll have more previews soon, but in the meantime, our presale is up and ready to take your orders.

The Late Child and Other Animals by Marguerite Van Cook and James Romberger - Cover

The Late Child and Other Animals by James Romberger and Marguerite Van Cook - Cover Uncovered
Written by Sonia Lei | Filed under previewsMarguerite Van CookJames RombergerComing Attractions 19 Sep 2014 8:30 AM

The Late Child and Other Animals by James Romberger and Marguerite Van Cook - Cover

A year following their collaboration on the critically acclaimed biography 7 Miles A Second, Marguerite Van Cook and James Romberger are back with The Late Child and Other Animals. This autobiographical work follows the story of Van Cook's mother, Hetty, through World War II, the loss of her husband, the adoption of her first daughter, and then the birth of Marguerite as a bastard child.

We are so pleased to unveil the final cover design for this personal, coming-of-age memoir. Keep your eyes peeled for more upcoming previews, and we've got the book ready for pre-order here.

Fantagraphics Celebrates Pride with Weekend Book Sale
Written by Sonia Lei | Filed under Wandering SonShimura TakakoSamuel R Delanysales specialsMoto HagioMia WolffMarguerite Van CookLove and RocketsJustin HallJames RombergerJaime HernandezGilbert HernandezEd LuceDavid WojnarowiczColleen Coover 27 Jun 2014 10:00 AM

Fantagraphics is celebrating Pride Weekend with a Book Sale!

Earlier this week, we posted a list of books with LGBTQ themes in honor of Pride Weekend.

Now through Sunday, June 29th, we're offering a sale on those very same books, with both discounts and bundled deals (and, in the case of Wuvable Oaf [edit: and MASSIVE!], beginning pre-orders)! Extend your Pride celebration into next month by picking up a new summer read, completing your Wandering Son collection, or finding the perfect gift for the near, dear, and queer friends in your life.


Julio's Day by Gilbert Hernandez

Julio's Day by Gilbert Hernandez

The life of a man, the span of a century. There is hope and joy, there is bullying and grief, there is war, there is love, there is heartbreak. A standalone masterpiece of elliptical, emotional storytelling from the pages of Love and Rockets, finally completed and collected.

$19.99 $14.99 • Add to CartMore Info & Previews

 

 

Maggie the Mechanic by Jaime Hernandez

Maggie the Mechanic by Jaime Hernandez

Maggie the Mechanic collects the earliest, punkiest, most heavily sci-fi stories of Maggie and her circle of friends, including best friend and sometimes lover Hopey, bombshell Penny Century, and Maggie's weird mentor Izzy.

$18.99 $14.24 • Add to CartMore Info & Previews

 

No Straight Lines edited by Justin HallNo Straight Lines (Softcover) edited by Justin Hall

The first definitive collection of the world's greatest LGBT comics. These smart, funny, and profound works provide an uncensored window into four decades of queer culture.

$35.00 $26.25 • Add to CartMore Info & Previews

 

 

Small Favors Vol.1 by Colleen CooverSmall Favors Vol. 1 by Colleen Coover

Featuring comicdom's most treasured girl-lovin' girls, this 128-page softcover collects the first four issues of the surprise hit erotic comic of 2001, plus a bunch of bonus art and previously-unseen strips!

$16.95 $12.71 • Add to CartMore Info & Previews

 

 

 

A Drunken Dream and Other Stories and Heart of Thomas by Moto Hagio

The Heart of Thomas + A Drunken Dream by Moto Hagio

A collection of 10 short stories spanning four decades and a shōjo masterpiece, both in English for the first time by one of Japan’s most influential and critically lauded comics innovators.

$64.98 $48.74 • Add to CartMore Info & Previews

 

Wandering Son Vols 4-6 by Shimura TakakoWandering Son Vols. 4-6 by Shimura Takako

Love is in the air. In junior high, the simple friendships of childhood develop into the complex, tense relationships of adolescence — and it's even more complicated when coping with the knotty issue of gender identification.

$69.97 $55.98 • Add to CartMore Info & Previews

7 Miles a Second and Bread & Wine

7 Miles a Second + Bread & Wine Memoir Set

Two vastly different comic memoirs, both emotionally charged and compelling in their own ways. Now together in one discounted bundle!

$34.98 $27.98 • Add to CartMore Info & Previews

 

 

 

 


Wuvable Oaf by Ed LuceWuvable Oaf by Ed Luce [Pre-Order]

Oaf is a large, scary-looking ex-wrestler living in San Francisco with a posse of adorable kitties. He is on a quest to find love in the big city and has set his sights on Eiffel, the lead singer of the grindcore band Ejaculoid. Expected to ship in early spring 2015!

$29.99 • Add to CartMore Info & Previews

 

Massive:Gay Erotic Manga and the Men Who Make It - CoverMassive: Gay Erotic Manga and the Men Who Make It [Pre-Order]

Big, burly, lascivious, and soft around the edges: welcome to the hyper-masculine world of Japanese gay comics. The first English-language anthology of its kind: a collection of manga from the most talented and influential artists in the gei komi genre. Expected to ship later this fall!

$35.00 • Add to Cart • More Info & Previews

 

Fantagraphics is celebrating Pride Weekend with a Book Sale

ALA GLBT Round Table honors 7 Miles a Second, Julio's Day, and Wandering Son
Written by Mike Baehr | Filed under Shimura TakakoMarguerite Van CookLove and RocketsJames RombergerGilbert HernandezDavid Wojnarowiczawards 29 Jan 2014 4:05 PM

7 Miles a Second by David Wojnarowicz, James Romberger & Marguerite Van Cook

Julio's Day by Gilbert Hernandez

Wandering Son Vol. 4 by Shimura Takako

We're very pleased to have had three books chosen by the American Library Association's GLBT Round Table for their two honors lists this year. 7 Miles a Second by David Wojnarowicz, James Romberger, and Marguerite Van Cook and Julio's Day by Gilbert Hernandez were both named to the 2014 Over the Rainbow List of recommended books for adult readers in the Graphic Narrative category, and Wandering Son Vol. 4 by Shimura Takako was chosen for the 2014 Rainbow List of recommended reading for younger readers under Graphic Novels. (This is the third year in a row on the list for the Wandering Son series.)

Congratulations to all the honorees!

This Week in Fantagraphics Events: 10/14-10/21
Written by janice headley | Filed under Peter BaggeMichael KuppermanJames Rombergerevents 15 Oct 2013 8:13 PM

James and Rick
photo credit: why, Marguerite Van Cook!

Wednesday, October 16th

New York City, NY:  Don't miss the opening reception for a new exhibit from James Romberger (collaborator behind New York Times Best Seller 7 Miles a Second) and Rick Prol at the Dorian Grey Gallery! (more info)

Minneapolis, MN:  Don't miss Peter Bagge, signing at Magers & Quinn Bookstore tonight for his new Drawn & Quarterly title The Woman Rebel: The Margaret Sanger Story, starting at 7:00 PM! (more info)

Peter Bagge
photo credit: Joshin Yamada, Stumptown 2012

Friday, October 18th

Iowa City, IA:  And then Peter Bagge is heading to Prairie Lights Bookstore for a signing at 7:00 PM! (more info)

Saturday, October 19th

Chicago, IL:  And theeeennn, you can find Peter Bagge at Quimby's Books! (more info)

Sunday, October 20th

Philadelphia, PA:  Spend the evening with Michael Kupperman! Kupperman will host a retrospective of his career thus far, including illustrated readings of his work and screenings of his animation including the Adult Swim pilot SNAKE ‘N’ BACON, plus brand new pieces. (more info)

Kupperman will host a retrospective of his career thus far, including illustrated readings of his work and screenings of his animation including the Adult Swim pilot SNAKE ‘N’ BACON, plus brand new pieces. - See more at: http://www.fantagraphics.com/index.php?option=com_myblog&show=An-Evening-With-Michael-Kupperman-This-Sunday-in-Philadelphia.html&Itemid=113#sthash.jtCGW4aM.dpuf

Monday, October 21st

Boston, MA:  And here's a reason to like Mondays: Peter Bagge at Brookline Booksmith! (more info)

James Romberger & Rick Prol Art Opening
Written by Jen Vaughn | Filed under Things to seeJames Rombergerart showsart 7 Oct 2013 12:45 PM

James and Rick

Come one, come all to the NYC art opening to celebrate the James Romberger and Rick Prol's show this October 16th. The reception will take place at the Dorian Grey Gallery on 9th Street (near Ave A.) from 6pm 'til 9pm. If you enjoyed Romberger's Fantagraphics graphic novel 7 Miles a Second or Post York from Uncivilized Books, this is the place to be!

The show will run from October 16h-November 17, 2013 and the gallery hours are Tuesday-Sunday 12pm-7pm.

Dorian Grey Gallery
437 East 9th Street (at Avenue A)
New York, NY 10009
516.244.4126
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Daily OCD 8.06.13
Written by Jen Vaughn | Filed under Willard MullinWalt KellyUlli LustTony MillionaireShimura TakakoSamuel R DelanyMoto HagioMia WolffMarc SobelLove and RocketsLeslie SteinKristy ValentiKipp FriedmanKim ThompsonKim DeitchJulia GfrörerJasonJames RombergerJaime HernandezJacques TardiHal FosterGraham ChaffeeGilbert HernandezFloyd GottfredsonEC ComicsDisneyDavid WojnarowiczDavid BDash ShawDanny BlandDaily OCDCrockett JohnsonCathy MalkasianCarl BarksAnders NilsenAl Williamson 6 Aug 2013 3:04 PM
The latest, largest kaiju monsters of Online Commentaries and Criticism:
 
 
• Review: New School in The A.V. Club. "Like Anders Nilsen, Dash Shaw has spent his career looking for a creatively profitable middle ground between high art and straightforward comics storytelling.…Shaw riffs on the popular culture of the ’90s and the politics of the ’00s, suggesting that the children of one decade grew up too cut off from reality to understand the part they played in fostering the global conflict of the next. The social commentary in New School provides a sharp accent to a formally daring, at times alarming coming-of-age tale," says Noel Murray.
 
• Review: New School in Paste Magazine.  "Dash Shaw is a relentless experimenter, never content to rely on the processes and approaches that garnered him acclaim the last go-round…Shaw’s ability to confidently follow his muse without justifying any artistic approach is part of what makes him such an exciting voice, and one that continues to refine itself with this excellent book," wrote Hillary Brown.
 
• Review: Mental Floss on New School. "Dash Shaw is one of the new generation of exciting comic creators who exist in a nexus between comics and the New York contemporary art scene... A glance at the pages here shows a bold, unusual use of color that seems part Power Mastrs, part Asterios Polyp," writes Rich Barrett. 
 
• Review: Comics Alliance reviews Dash Shaw's New School. John Parker writes, "New School is surreal, emotional, and delirious with color…Moving, innovative, and beautiful, it's hard to imagine you'd confuse the woozy, dreamsick, and explosively colored pages of New School for any other artist's, no matter what distance you're viewing them from." 
 
• Interview (audio): Dash Shaw is interviewed on Robin McConnell's Inkstuds again! 
 
• Plug: New School in The Austin American Statesmen. "on first read, it is melancholic, funny and smartly impressionistic, three things that comics do well…Dash Shaw likes to move through styles, and it’s exciting. As soon as you think you have a fix on his forms, he tweaks it just a bit," writes Joe Gross. 
 
 
• Review: NPR lists Today is the Last Day of the Rest of Your Life as one of the five touching comics of summer. "Lust's desire to experience real life and to learn things beyond books is by turns uplifting and painful, funny and frightening…The result is a modern coming-of-age story that addresses the thrills and consequences of being young, idealistic, and more than a little lucky," Myla Goldberg sums up.
 
• Review: The National Post on Today is the Last Day of the Rest of Your Life by Ulli Lust. "Last Day is, essentially, a memoir of powerlessness, of how fruitless our attempts to shape our own lives can be - a fact often reflected in her lines, simple and crisp but frequently lost in the chaos of big scenes.…It's an honesty, intimate and universal, that comics capture better than any medium, and Lust's entry is an almost perfect instance," states David Berry. 
 
• Review: Slant Magazine looks at Today is the Last Day of the Rest of Your Life by Ulli Lust. Tim Peters says, "…it's spontaneous, sexual, and both cynically and internationally adventurous. It's also further proof that the graphic novel is going to dethrone the novel as the 21st century's preferred form for telling a story…A good way to think about Today Is the Last Day is as a kind of anti-Eat, Pray, Love."
 
• Plug: Cleaver Magazine on Today is the Last Day of the Rest of Your Life by Ulli Lust. "…the beauty of this graphic memoir is in the way, image by image and line by line, it captures that yearning and its momentary fulfillments in the shapes of breathtaking, carefully drawn landscapes, or drawings that depict Ulli's surreal fantasies, like her body floating happily over the Spanish stairs," writes Tahneer Oksman
 
• Review: Cult Montreal enjoys Today is the Last Day of the Rest of Your Life by Ulli Lust. "Today is the Last Day of the Rest of Your Life is a gripping read that feels like a story a close friend might tell you after returning from a long voyage. Lust's lively illustration style and enthralling narrative voice make this graphic novel a feminist On the Road for the twenty-first century," writes Jeff Miller.
 
• Plug: Largehearted Boy lists Today is the Last Day of the Rest of Your Life by Ulli Lust as one of the picks of the week "It's a frank, funny, occasionally brutal coming-of-age story…There's plenty of sex, drugs, and violence, though it's Lust's insight and sensitivity that really make it shine," writes The Librarie Drawn & Quarterly Bookstore.
 

Today is the Last Day of the Rest of Your Life is a gripping read that feels like a story a close friend might tell you after returning from a long voyage. Lust’s lively illustration style and enthralling narrative voice make this graphic novel a feminist On the Road for the twenty-first century. - See more at: http://cultmontreal.com/2013/07/comics-review-ulli-lust-tom-gauld-joe-ollmann/#sthash.5LDUqr84.dpuf

Today is the Last Day of the Rest of Your Life is a gripping read that feels like a story a close friend might tell you after returning from a long voyage. Lust’s lively illustration style and enthralling narrative voice make this graphic novel a feminist On the Road for the twenty-first century. - See more at: http://cultmontreal.com/2013/07/comics-review-ulli-lust-tom-gauld-joe-ollmann/#sthash.5LDUqr84.dpu
 
 
• Interview: Matt Seneca interviews Charles Forsman of The End of the Fucking World and being compared to Charles Schulz on Comics Alliance. "It is very much about being fucked-up when you are a teen and that should be a timeless idea. We all go through that. I guess the 80s thing is something that I use as an atmospheric reference for myself," says Forsman. "Forsman managed to do what even the most talented cartoonists often have difficulty with, fusing the honesty of presentation and uninflected realism native to classic alternative comics with the white-knuckle pace and jaw-clenching cliffhangers of the best action storytelling," writes Seneca.
 
• Interview: Chuck Forsman talks about mini-comics, schoolin' and The End of the Fucking World with Spurgeon on The Comics Reporter<. "I really enjoyed building something with smaller bricks. I guess that's how I've always thought of comics, breaking it down into scenes. Even when I'm just doing one book. I also like to mix the bricks up a bit." . 
 
Wake Up, Percy Gloom!
 
• Review: The New York Journal of Books enjoys Wake Up, Percy Gloom by Cathy Malkasian. "In a graphic novel filled with exceptional art, lush dreamscapes and characters of rich beauty, Ms. Malkasian brings simple moments to life that show us the depth of someone's heart," writes Mark Squirek. "Wake Up, Percy Gloom reminds us that every single moment is important because at any second apples may bloom and fall from the sky."
 
• Review: iFanboy on Wake Up, Percy Gloomby Cathy Malkasian. "Malkasian decorates the tale with surreal and absurd dressing (reminiscent of the land of Oz, more than anything else), and plots with twists and turns that are almost impossible to anticipate....If L Frank Baum, Jim Henson and, Jeff Smith wrote a comic together, it would feel (and look) a bit like Percy Gloom," writes Josh Christie. 
 
• Review: The Comic Pusher looks at Wake Up, Percy Gloomby Cathy Malkasian. "Part cutting satire, part fairy tale, part nightmare…Wake Up, Percy Gloom! is another astonishing work from Malkasian, a beautiful and uplifting graphic novel filled with magic and loss and joy. Malkasian, a veteran animator and now highly accomplished cartoonist, once more delivers a work of startling power cementing herself as one of the most distinct and important voices in comics," pens Jeffrey  O. Gustafson.
 
• Commentary: Jessica Lee report on The Beat about Cathy Malkasian's talk at the California College of Arts. "The amount of precision and undeniable heart Cathy puts into every ounce of her characters, panel construction, and worldbuilding is commendable, filling WAKE UP PERCY GLOOM with the kind of rare wonder that make it a gem in the pool of graphic novels…" writes Lee.
 
 
• Review: Eye of the Majestic Creature Vol. 2 by Leslie Stein is reviewed on VICE. "What Leslie does with her work is special. She seems largely influenced by newspaper comics, but her stories are subtle.…The core of this series seems to be about how uncomfortable it is to interact with other people and how lonely it can be in New York," says Nick Gazin.
 
• Review: Eye of the Majestic Creature Vol. 2 by Leslie Stein on Comics Bulletin. "Leslie Stein is a voice for a certain aspect of her generation, the ones you see feigning ironic detachment while inside they are either all honest excitement or vast empathy. While it's just so much easier and cooler not to get emotionally involved, for people like Stein, that's just really not possible," writes Daniel Elkin. 
 
Good Dog
 
• Review: Good Dog by Graham Chaffee on Forbidden Planet International. "It's a brilliant little book, one I could quite cheerfully have read much more of, one that definitely left me wanting more…throughout the book, Chaffee paints the picture so vividly that you understand that dogs, just like us, are complicated beasts, and each has to find their own life," writes Richard Bruton.  
 
• Review: The Hooded Utilitarian reviews Good Dog by Graham Chaffee. "Chaffee largely eschews panels which are filled with multifarious meaning and intricate correlations, adopting congenial, unsensational storytelling, evoking time, place and character; the gentle rhythms of a nostalgia associated with the early to mid twentieth century…The central questions being tackled here appear to be those of belief, ideology, and faith. A tangential discussion of deist philosophy may not be out of the question as well," writes Ng Suat Tong.
 
• Plug: Drawn Words on Good Dog by Graham Chaffee. "Good Dog is absolutely one of the most interesting comics of the year…Ivan's struggle as a stray is parallel to everyday human interaction and quest for personal fulfillment, exploring animal psychology in the simplest way Chaffee can possibly explain, while simultaneously maintaining a strong grip of emotion," muses Kevin Cortez.
 
• Plug (audio): Good Dog by Graham Chaffee on Bullseye with Jesse Thorn 
 
The End   Katherine Whaley
 
• Review: The End by Anders Nilsen on The A.V. Club. "This is a book from comics' more avant-garde wing, and a premier example of how to make experimental work that still connects broadly, rather than coming across as self-indulgent vamping," writes Noel Murray. 

• Plug: New York 1 on The End\ by Anders Nilsen. "…this beautiful creation explores grief and life, unanswered questions and unquestioned thought," states Andrew Losowsky.  
 
• Interview: Alex Dueben of CBR interviews Kim Deitch on The Amazing, Enlightening and Absolutely True Adventures of Katherine Whaley, process and the inclusion of beavers. "Well, when you read around in old fiction there is a whole genre of stuff that you might categorize as "hollow earth" stories. You know, hidden teeming civilizations deep within the earth.…The almost human workaholic activities of beavers seemed like a potentially good fit to a story of that kind," answered Deitch.
 
• Plug: The "underground comix legend Kim Deitch returns with an epic graphic novel" writes Benn Ray on The Amazing, Enlightening and Absolutely True Adventures of Katherine Whaley at Largehearted Boy.
 
Lost Cat
 
• Review: The National Post reviews Lost Cat. "Jason is one of the few artists (or writers) who can make existential aches seem droll, but it makes the smiles being provoked feel as honest as the ones we get when standing across from someone who makes the world feel a little less lonely," muses David Barry.
 
• Review: Comics Alliance gives Jason's Lost Cat the whatfor! "If you're familiar with Jason's previous work, you know his mastery of minimalist storytelling is what drives his art. His anthropomorphic, near emotionless characters, along with his consistent four panel page layouts, are his signature," writes Joseph Hughes.
 
• Review: Comics Bulletin looks at Jason's Lost Cat. "In a way it asks us to consider what is more meaningful, actually connecting or the longing to connect in the first place…Jason is an artist of a high caliber and reading Lost Cat confirms this. He creates in isolation, ruminates about our inability to connect, and, by doing so, brings us together," writes Daniel Elkin.
 
• Plug: Lost Cat is on Publishers Weekly Picks of the Week. "A humorous PI story populated by animals takes a turn toward the absurd in the newest-and longest yet-graphic novel by Jason."
 
• Review (audio): Episode 19 of Comics For Grownups looks at Lost Cat.
 
Bread and Wine  
 
Review: iFanboy on Bread & Wine by Samuel Delany and Mia Wolff. "The book is short...but packs some serious punch. Lots of the credit can go to Mia Wolff, whose black-and-white pen work adds some serious grittiness to the story. The only thing I love more than a good love story is a good atypical love story, and Bread & Wine fits the bill nicely," writes Josh Christie. 
 
• Review: Bread & Wine by Samuel Delany and Mia Wolff on Sequential Tart<. "The story itself is intimate and at times awkward to read, which makes it feel very real and personal. Delany doesn't shy away from some of the less-appealing moments in the relationship...Bread & Wine is an unusual offering, and certainly won't be to everyone's taste, but it's certainly worth a read now that it's widely available and reasonably priced," writes Katie Frank.
 
• Review: Bread &Wine by Samuel Delany and Mia Wolff was reviewed on Comics Grinder. "This graphic novel, originally published in 1999, springs from a memoir and stands alone as engaging and insightful...For a book that promises an erotic tale, there are even more scenes that speak to the great divide between the two men which they will either struggle with or overcome," wrote Henry Chamberlain, Comics Grinder
 
• Plug: Bread & Wine by Samuel Delany and Mia Wolff on Largehearted Boy. "With Alan Moore contributing an introduction and Neil Gaiman and Junot Diaz (and Frank Miller in case that still means something to anyone) singing its praises, you know Bread & Wine has something special going on," says Benn from Atomic Books.
 
Hip Hop Family Tree   Black is the Color 
 
• Plug: Publishers Weekly on Hip Hop Family Tree by Ed Piskor. Maurice Boyer details the creative process: "each strip [is] a full week affair in which he spends a day of research and writing immersed in books, videos or interviews in search of inspiration for the week's strip. From there, he spends the rest of the week drawing his pages by hand and coloring them on the computer."
 
• Interview: Julia Gfrӧrer is interviewed on The Beat by Zainab Ahktar. "I like writing for a contemporary setting, but a contemporary mermaid story would be kind of a hard sell, it feels unpleasantly whimsical to me, so for that reason Black is the Color had to be set in the past." nbsp;
 
7 Miles a Second  In Case We Die
 
• Review: HIV+ on 7 Miles a Second by David Wojnarowicz, James Romberger and Marguerite Van Cook. "It can be difficult to remember in 2013, just how despised gays were and just how oblivious the rest of society seemed to the AIDS epidemic in those dark days.… But 7 Miles a Second captures the rage and impotence felt by thousands of young gay men who were suddenly faced with the brutal finality of death," writes Jacob Anderson-Minshall.
 
• Review: Hyperallergic on 7 Miles a Second by David Wojnarowicz, James Romberger and Marguerite Van Cook.. "Wojnarowicz…didn’t win the great game of life; they lost bitterly. To hear about those losses firsthand, to watch them unfold in words that essentially position us as front-row spectators, is devastating.…If there’s another theme in 7 Miles a Second, one that counteracts the weight of the body, it must be motion. Evident in both the form and content of the text, motion offers the promise of escape," writes Jillian Steinhauer.
 
• Commentary: MSN ran a story about the Sub Pop Silver Jubilee and the In Case We Die reading & signing by Danny Bland. "Bland read a passage about the first time the book's main character and his teenaged girlfriend shoot up - a degenerate scene redolent of hindsight romanticizing. Packed inside the bookstore, the audience roared approval. Only in Seattle." 
 
• Interview: The Weekings' Joe Daly (a different one!) interviews Danny Bland on In Case We Die and getting clean, "Well, the catalyst for me getting clean was the classic tale of running out of resources. I did drugs until I ran out of money, and friends to steal from, and eventually the criminal element that I became involved with became too hot." Read more about these adventures in In Case We Die!
 
Goddamn This War! Barnaby  
 
• Review: Forbidden Planet International on Jacques Tardi's Goddamn This War! "This is going straight into my own collection, and in my opinion every decent graphic novel collection needs some Tardi in it, he is one of the great masters of the medium," sums up Joe Gordon.
 
• Review:  The French Embassy outlines Goddamn This War! "Goddamn This War! shares with [It Was the War of the] Trenches its sustained sense of outrage, pitch-black gallows humor, and impeccably scrupulous historical exactitude."
 
• Review: Washington Post on Barnaby by Crockett Johnson. "A whole new generation now will have the opportunity to become acquainted with Johnson's influential creation...Liberals may love Barnaby, but there is no reason why conservatives and libertarians can't admire the beauty, simplicity, wittiness and intelligence of this groundbreaking strip, too," posits Michael Taube. 
 
• Review: Barnaby by Crockett Johnson reviewed by The A.V. Club<. "With Barnaby, Johnson combined low-impact serialized adventure with some gentle comedy based around the ways that adults and kids diverge in their perspectives. The result is a compulsively readable strip with a winningly off-kilter point-of-view-and a cultural treasure that's been long-overdue for this kind of prestige archival project..." posits Noel Murray.  
 
• Plug: Mental Floss on Barnaby by Crockett Johnson. "It mixed fantasy, satire and political commentary and its humor was often very subtle. So subtle that its popularity was limited compared to most strips of the day. Editors Eric Reynolds and Philip Nel have taken great pains to annotate many of the topical references that were made to help new readers appreciate what Barnaby's small but devoted readership enjoyed at the time," pens Rich Barrett.
 
Mickey Mouse Color Sunday   Pogo Vol. 2
  
• Review: Comics Worth Reading flips through Mickey Mouse Color Sundays by Floyd Gottfredson. "The lighter approach makes this book a better choice to share with your young ones. They should love the timeless highjinks of the mouse and his friends. And anyone can appreciate the skilled cartooning and astounding art, so well-done it almost seems to move on paper," writes Johanna Draper Carlson. 
 
• Review: Robot 6 on Mickey Mouse Color Sundays by Floyd Gottfredson. "What I really took away from this book, however, was Gottfredson's considerable (and very nuanced) compositional and storytelling skills...an entertaining read and still a thrill to see what Gottfredson work out and then master this longer styled-format. Disney fans - or just fans of solid, entertaining comics in general - won't be disappointed."  
 
• Review: The Complete Syndicated Pogo Vol.2 "Bona Fide Balderdash" by Walt Kelly receives a 5 outta 5 stars from Comics Bulletin. "The world of those delightful characters feels tremendously lavish and vivid. Kelly's strip came from an era of deep graphical inventiveness…This book is pure magic, suitable for both a fourth grade teacher and a fourth grader," muses Jason Sacks. 
 
Love and Rockets Companion   Prince Valiant 6 
 
• Review: Page 45 on Love and Rockets: The Companion edited by Marc Sobel and Kristy Valenti. "Best of all, however, are the interviews, so utterly addictive that I almost missed my review deadline…Editor Marc Sobel's interview with Los Bros Hernandez delivers some astonishing insights into the cycle of each story's conception, execution, then complete burned-out numbness in Jaime... and workaholic Gilbert's crippling self-doubt halfway through each chapter early on," states Stephen L. Holland.
 
• Review: Spectrum Culture enjoys Hal Foster's Prince Valiant 6: 1947-1948.  "Readers unfamiliar with the Prince Valiant strip owe it to themselves to take a look. The stories encapsulate the values of a simpler, less cynical time, and the illustrations are first-rate," writes David Maine.
 
• Fun: Amazing fan art by Tim Sievert  of Prince Valiant.    
 
• Interview (audio): Forbidden Planet talks to Jaime Hernandez on Love and Rockets, alternative comics and more. 
 
Love and Rockets: The Covers Maakies 
 
• Plug: Comics Alliance gets PUMPED for Love and Rockets: The Covers.
 
• Plug: An odd but fun article on Love and Rockets and baseball on The Good Phight. "It's odd, Jaime's stories in L&R, collected in the massive Locas collections, are kind of geek treasure troves. Clearly Jaime is influenced by punk and 80's alt California, but he's also really into superheroes, luchadores, and monster movies, so you get this weird melange of nostalgia for all of this old nerd culture."
 
• Plug: Gawker breaks down all the little chickeny parts in their way with Tony Millionaire's Green Eggs and Maakies
 
Wandering Son Vol. 4  
 
• Commentary: Deb Aoki reports on Best/Worst Manga Panel at SDCC 2013. Moto Hagio's The Heart of Thomas is listed as Best New Manga for Kids/Teens. Wandering Son by Shimura Takako is listed on Best Continuing Series for Kids/Teens. And finally Inio Asano's Nijigahara Holograph lands on the Most Anticipated New Manga list.
 
• Review: Wandering Son Vol. 4 is reviewed on Experiments in Manga. "As nostalgic as Wandering Son can be, the middle school years haven't been idealized in the series.…Wandering Son is more about characters than a linear plot, but the fourth volume is an important setup for what comes next in the series," says Ash Brown.
 
• Plug: The Heart of Thomas gets a shout out at OTAKU USA on Yaoi Day!  
 
Golden Age of Baseall    50 Girls 50 
 
• Review: School Library Journal looks at Willard Mullin's Golden Age of Baseball and how it is applicable in the classroom! "student sports fans (in this case, baseball fans specifically) can leverage their outside-of-school literacies to comprehend and appreciate the sophisticated cartoons and high-level text in Willard Mullin’s Golden Age of Baseball," says Peter Gutierrez.
 
• Plug: "…this Willard Mullin book has a lot of beautiful cartooning in it," states Tom Spurgeon of the Comics Reporter on Willard Mullin's Golden Age of Baseball.nbsp;
 
• Review: Full Stop is pleased with the Fantagraphics' EC Comics Library. "It's fitting that Fantagraphics - long-time champion of the rights and importance of comics creators, and re-issuer important historical comics - would arrange a publishing line this way. Even though it may not be surprising, it's still a commendable decision. It's also an important development in further establishing comics as art and literature worthy of serious consideration and study.… It presents work by EC’s most important artists, drawing the work from across all EC titles," states Sam Costello.
 
• Review: Comics Bulletin] >on 50 Girls 50 by Al Williamson. It "is an affordable means of acquiring a pleasingly complete collection of this seminal work by a seminal artist.
 
Barracuda in the Attic Old Castle's Secret  The Littlest Pirate King
 
• Plug: Boing Boing's Mark Frauenfelder comments on Barracuda in the Attic coming out soon by Kipp Friedman. "What a talented family!"   
 
• Plug: Boing Boing delights in The Littlest Pirate King by David B. "So, it's a little grim. But it's also gorgeous…If you liked the premise of Neil Gaiman's award-winning Graveyard Book, you're sure to love this, but be aware that it's much a darker and sadder story than Gaiman's. I think this is probably suited to kids eight or nine and up…" suggests Cory Doctorow.
 
• Review: Jason Sacks on the Comics Bulletin gives Donald Duck: The Old Castle's Secret by Carl Barks the run down. "This book is an absolutely delightful assortment of stories, a thoroughly charming, delightful collection of vivid stories full of clever wordplay and slapstick action…Barks tells the story in ways that have to delight any reader.The more I read of Barks's comics, the more I come to love them."
 
• Interview: Editor Mike Catron talks to Disney Dads on Babble about Carl Barks and the latest Donald Duck: The Old Castle's Secret
 
• Interview: Gil Roth of Chimera Obscura 1interviews both Michael Kupperman and Ivan Brunetti in this episode sure to make you guffaw.  
 
• Commentary: CBR's Corey Blake writes a very thorough report on the Kim Thompson Tribute panel at San Diego.  
Daily OCD 5/24/13
Written by Jen Vaughn | Filed under Ulli LustSteven WeissmanPeter BaggeMatthias WivelLove and RocketsKim ThompsonJulia GfrörerJohnny RyanJasonJames RombergerJaime HernandezJacques BoyreauJack DavisGuy PeellaertGilbert HernandezFloyd GottfredsonEd PiskorEC ComicsDrew FriedmanDisneyDavid WojnarowiczDash ShawDaily OCDChuck ForsmanAnders NilsenAl WilliamsonAl Feldstein 24 May 2013 12:30 PM

The coldest Dip'n'Dots of Online Commentaries & Marketing: 

Peter Bagge's Other Stuff

• Interview: Comic Book Resources and Alex Dueben interview Peter Bagge about Other Stuff and his favorite collaborations in the book, "The earliest one in the book, "Life in These United States," didn't come out looking at all like I had envisioned it…what Clowes did with it was truly remarkable. Also, Gilbert [Hernandez] radically changed the faces, ages and even genders of almost everyone in the "Me" strip. That threw me for a loop! Though it didn't negatively impact the story in the slightest."

• Review: The A.V. Club looks at Peter Bagge's Other Stuff. "Other Stuff also brings together strips Bagge has written about rock icons, along with a few cartoon essays, and strips featuring his characters Lovey and The Leeways, who respectively represent hipster adventurism and dogged domesticity. It’s a full picture of who Bagge has been as an artist and humorist over the past 20 years, and as such is as valuable for newcomers as fans…" writes Noel Murray.

• Interview: Peter Bagge is interviewed on Societe Perrier by Christian J Petersen on comics, Seattle and growing up clever. "Did your parents encourage your creativity? No, though they didn't discourage it. They were drunk."

The Adventures of Jodelle

• Review: The Quietus looks at The Adventures of Jodelle by Guy Peellaert and Pierre Bartier. Aug Stone writes, "Jodelle is fantastic in every sense of the word, filled with in-jokes and time-defying references, nudity and sex (not always coinciding), exaggerated violence, but most importantly a sense of pushing the edges of possibility…The original Pop Art comic and one of the first ‘adult comics’ (released a year after Barbarella by same publisher Eric Losfeld), Jodelle is an artistic tour de force."

• Review: Bookgasm looks at The Adventures of Jodelle by Guy Peellaert. "…let the fleshy neon visuals explode into your eyeballs.…It won’t have the same impact today, as many of its visual ideas have been appropriated and subverted into the mainstream culture, but as both a time capsule of its era and as a visually stunning romp, it remains a unique experience that should certainly be at least sampled by any adventurous modern reader of comics. Playfully provocative, funny and smart, THE ADVENTURES OF JODELLE pops with a soft-lined splash of lurid color," writes JT Lindroos.

• Review: It's Nice That and look at The Adventures of Jodelle. "Peellaert was every bit the master of his craft and with enviable vision and flair managed to transform a previously safe medium into something exciting and dangerous…It’s intoxicating stuff!" exclaims James Cartwright.

• Plug: Russ Meyer and Juxtapoz plug The Adventures of Jodelle.
Today is the Last Day of the Rest of Your Life

• Interview: Robin McConnell of Inkstuds interviews THE Ulli Lust, cartoonist of Today is the Last Day of the Rest of Your Life.

Sexytime

• Review: Mr. Media looks at Sexytime and interviews editor Jacques Boyreau

Hip Hop Family Tree

• Interview: HeroesOnline and Seth Peagler interview Ed Piskor about comics, music and Hip Hop Family Tree. Piskor states, "There were some interesting things to look at while writing the book. It’s necessary to know the political/economic climate at the time. The fine art scene plays an integral role in the development of early Hip Hop as well, which many people might not know. If it wasn’t for the downtown scene gravitating toward graffiti culture it could have all died out in the early 80s."

Love and Rockets: New Stories #5 Julio's Day

• Review: I Reads You reads Love and Rockets: New Stories #5 by Jaime and Gilbert Hernandez. Leroy Douresseaux writes, "This publishing format is designed to appeal to the people who decide what will make the shelves of bookstores.…this is another volume of New Stories which proves that Love and Rockets is as strong as ever and is ready for 30 more great years."

• Review: Kotaku's roundtable discuss what they did and didn't like about Julio's Day by Gilbert Hernandez. Evan Narcisse posits "I did like how the family lived on the fringes of the 20th Century. It reminded me A LOT of Gabriel Garcia Marquez' 100 Years of Solitude. The weird almost-incest, characters with the same names and weird proclivities, home-as-a-black-hole-you-can't-escape, the outside world as an exotic dangerous place, nature as this karmic equalizer …"

7 Miles a Second

• Interview: Nicole Rudick of The Comics Journal interviews James Romberger and Marguerite Van Cook about 7 Miles A Second and their creative life together. James mentions, "…it is about empathy, the only thing we have that allows us to touch each other. So if there’s anything positive to be taken out of the book, it’s that we should be working toward a more empathetic experience while we’re on the planet."

EC Comics

• Review: Comic Book Resources looks at 50 Girls 50 by Al Williamson. "It’s interesting seeing how different some of the artwork is – Williamson liked science fiction, apparently, and was occasionally bored with the other stories William Gaines or Al Feldstein gave him, but there’s no story here that doesn’t at least offer something sublime…Fantagraphics has done a really nice job bringing a lot of the 1940s/1950s stuff back into print, and if they keep picking such cool stuff like this, I’ll just have to keep buying it!" exclaims Greg Burgas.

• Review: Spectrum Culture looks at 'Tain't the Meat by Jack Davis. "Davis was a phenomenal draftsman whose dynamic line work could imbue even static scenes with restless energy, and whose clean but detailed layouts could bring to life queasiness-inducing tableaux of rotting corpses and piled intestines…Al Feldstein and Carl Wessler wrote the lion’s share of these tales and had a knack for mixing cruel irony and creeping dread.…EC has been gone for decades now, but volumes like this help ensure that its influence won’t be forgotten." writes David Maine.
 
New School

• Review: The Portland Mercury on Dash Shaw's New School. "The experience of reading New School is like temporarily inhabiting the body and brain of an artist: This is what growing up might feel like for someone who lives and breathes colors and shapes," writes Allison Hallett. "It's heady, hallucinatory, and bizarre, but it's grounded in the simple experience of growing up in the shadow of a beloved older sibling."

Prison Pit Book 4

• Interview: Societe Perrier by Christian J Petersen interview Johnny Ryan. "You seem to be exploring a darkside in your work but you soften the blow with humor. What would your real darkside look like? Prison Pit. "

Black is the Color Barack Hussein Obama

• Plug: Buzzfeed tells you what you want to read in the webcomics department: Steven Weissman's Barack Hussein Obama (and co) and Julia Gfrorer's Black is the Color (coming out soon in print)!

Mickey Mouse Vol 1 Mickey Mouse Vol. 2

• Plug: Duckburg Weekly looks at Walt Disney's Mickey Mouse Vol. 1: Race to Death Valley and Mickey Mouse Volume 2: Trapped on Treasure Island by Floyd Gottfredson. "With Walt Disney's Mickey Mouse Classic Collection Fantagraphics Books published a must-have for everyone who's interested in early works of the Walt Disney Company!…[Vol. 1]offers amazing articles about the 'birth' of Mickey Mouse, bonus panels which were never published and different artists in the spotlight (such as Al Taliaferro and Jack King)…Again [in Vol. 2] there is a chapter with incredible bonus material which informs about the villains, Floyd's colleagues and additional comic strips."

The End

• Interview: It's Nice That and James Cartwright interviewed Anders Nilsen about The End, coming out in print this fall. "…some of it is pretty raw, and that’s how I felt at the time. Some of it is funny, too, I think, which is also part of the experience. It can feel very absurd at times. If it feels like a crazy emotional roller coaster to read, then it’s doing the job."

The End of the Fucking World

• Plug: The Daily Rios reviews Chuck Forsman's The End of the Fucking World in its serialized form.

Kolor Klimax

• Review: The Comics Journal reviewed the Kolor Klimax anothology, edited by Matthias Wivel. Robert Kirby writes, "I found myself drawn back to each several times…That, for me, is the common vibe generated by this and other Euro-comics anthologies: the sense of possibility and novelty that comes from having available a whole new frontier of previously hard-to-come-by alt-comics by accomplished artists to explore. Comics speak a universal, intuitive language, but this 'Nordic Hypnotica' opens Americans up to previously unfamiliar dialects that are a pleasure to read, enjoy, and occasionally decode."

Any Similarity

• Review: Kitty Sneezes looks at Drew and Josh Alan Friedman's Any Similarity to Persons Living or Dead is Purely Coincidental. "Shemp acts both as a beacon of Drew Friedman's amazing artistic skill, but also as a signpost of what you'll find.…strips starring the semi-forgotten figures of old media. Figures like Abbott & Costello, Chet Huntley, Joe Franklin or Tor Johnson come up frequently. I especially love the Tor strips. And usually, though there's a surrealist bent like you'd find in the work of Michael Kupperman, there's usually a sense of love for the work of these people" writes Rev. Syung Myung Me.

• Plug: A JASON mural in Oslo!

• Commentary: Michael Netzer says some nice things and does a beautiful drawing of Kim Thompson. 

• Commentary: Casey Burbachy writes about the history of Fantagraphics and our partnership with digital comics publisher/distribution company, comiXology on Publishers Weekly.

• Cool: A lot of our cartoonists have contributed to the Exquisite Corpse comic on Trubble Club!

• Commentary (photos): Inkstuds host Robin McConnell took some loverly photos of Larry Reid, Jacq Cohen and me at Emerald City Comic Con.

• Interview: Jacq Cohen describes why TCAF rocks and our new books there on Forbidden Planet International and soon to be in a store near you.

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