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Category >> James Romberger

Daily OCD 3/26/13
Written by Jen Vaughn | Filed under William S BurroughsWalt KellyWally WoodPeter BaggePaul NelsonNoah Van SciverLeslie SteinKevin AveryJanet HamlinJames RombergerHarvey KurtzmanEd PiskorEC ComicsDavid WojnarowiczDash ShawDaily OCDBlake BellBill Everett 26 Mar 2013 6:58 PM

The tallest seedlings of Online Commentaries & Diversions:

Dash Shaw

• Review: ForeWord looks at Dash Shaw's New School. "Like its predecessors, New School is unlike everything else out there.…It’s a startling, yet aptly mundane vision of one man’s future, made all the more believable by Shaw’s expressive, cartoony drawings and generally solid scripting…ultimately, it’s an entertaining and thoughtful graphic novel," writes Bill Baker.

The Lost Art of Ah Pook Observed While Falling

• Review: Paraphilia Magazine covers the two Malcolm McNeill books about his collaborations with William S. Burroughs. "Observed While Falling is an invaluable addition to the library of any Burroughs fan…Having shed light on a previously dark corner of the Burroughs legacy, will hopefully provide vital research material for critical analysis of this gravely neglected work produced during a largely overlooked period in his career," writes Edward S. Robinson. The Lost Art of Ah Pook enchants, "Mc Neill’s images – they’re more than mere illustrations – are rich, complex, and often very strange indeed. Disturbed and disturbing…Mc Neill’s large-form images are remarkable works of art…throughout the quality of Mc Neill’s draftsmanship is of a rare standard."
 
 Pogo Vol. 1 Pogo Vol. 2

• Review: Comics Worth Reading recommends Pogo Vol. 1 and Vol. 2 by Walt Kelly. "These upscale volumes collecting the classic Pogo comic strip are archival quality, beautifully reproduced and a pleasure to look upon…Pogo is well-loved for a reason. The strips are beautifully drawn and keenly observent of human nature."

Sketching Guantanamo

• Interview (audio): Janet Hamlin is interviewed by Anna Maria Tremonti on CBC Radio show, The Current, about working on Sketching Guantanamo and being at the courtroom trials. "What I'm working on that day is determined by whatever activity is in court…"
 
Peter Bagge's Other Stuff
 
• Review (audio): Brian Heater is a guest on Bullseye with Jesse Thorn and brings up Peter Bagge's Other Stuff. Heater gabs, "…the iconic underground cartoonist of the 90s, anything depicted a slacker or the grunge era was probably by Bagge. Other Stuff has an overly cartoony look that is nicely juxtaposed by true-to-life stories…"
 
Hip Hop Family Tree
 
• Interview (video): Ed Piskor is interviewed by Jared Gardner during his Columbus Museum of Art Residency and speaks on his life through comics and Hip Hop Family Tree. "I grew up in just a hip hop environment, my house was the nucleus between three parks in town you could go to any given one and see some hip hop going on, rudimentary stuff …a few slabs of linoleum and a boombox," answered Piskor.

The Hypo

• Review: ConSequential reviewed The Hypo by Noah Van Sciver recently. "Van Sciver’s depiction is sufficiently sympathetic as to make the reader really root for him as he struggles against rival suitors, Mary’s family and his own anxious temperament. …the fact that it’s endearing, engaging and an all-round good read should make it your kind of thing as well," writes Lucy Boyes.

7 Miles a Second

• Plug: Our Man in Boston profiles David Wojnarowicz and 7 Miles a Second. "Artists James Romberger and Marguerite Van Cook vividly depict David Wojnarowicz’s life and struggles in a much improved edition…" says Robert Birnbaum.

Eye of the Majestic Creature Beta Testing the Apocalypse

• Plug: Eye of the Majestic Creature's Leslie Stein is interview about her band and answers a few questions about her comics too on Audiofemme.

• Review: Grovel reads Beta Testing the Apocalypse by Tom Kaczynski. "Anyone that likes the exploration of ideas, particularly the relationship between humanity, geography, architecture and technology, might get a kick out of reading something different, especially presented in such an unusual form," writes Andy Shaw. 

Corpse on the Imjin! Came the Dawn  

•Review: MetroPulse checks out the EC Library Comics from Wallace Wood and Harvey Kurtzman. "EC had no fear of getting political, long before comics 'grew up.'…Fantagraphics’ EC Comics Library is a must-own for anyone who considers themselves a serious comics fan." Corpse on the Imjin! is "Thoroughly researched and meticulously detailed, Kurtzman’s stories are grim stuff in an era when most Americans believed their country could do no wrong… Grade-school boys reading these dark tales at the time must have had their minds completely blown." Meanwhile, Wally Wood's Came the Dawn! "The tales here are mostly crowd-pleasers with the sort of twist endings that would later become a Twilight Zone trademark."

Everything is Afterthought: The Life and Writings of Paul Nelson

• Review: Everything is an Afterthought by Kevin Avery is examined in Caught by the River. Andy Childs says, "it becomes apparent that when the history of rock’n'roll is ever written as it should be then he, Nelson, will take his place as a pivotal and hugely influential figure…Kevin Avery does a masterly job in re-constructing Paul Nelson’s reputation and after the enthusiastic critique in the first half of the book the examples of his work in the second half do not disappoint at all."

 Adele Blanc-Sec Amazing Mysteries

• Review: Nick Gazin of Vice features two of our books in his recent Comic-Book Love-In. Spoiler warning on the Jacques Tardi's The Extraordinary Adventures of Adèle Blanc-Sec Vol. 2,  though."She scowls through her adventures…The drawings are very pretty, though." He continues on with Amazing Mysteries: The Bill Everett Archives Vol. 1, edited by Blake Bell."These are some crudely-drawn-but-often-pretty comics from the late 30s."

 

YEE-HAW! Digital Comics Corral
Written by Jen Vaughn | Filed under Tim LaneSteve DuinSpain RodriguezspainShannon WheelerRichard SalaR Kikuo JohnsonOil and WaterNoah Van SciverNo Straight LinesMichael KuppermanLove and RocketsLinda MedleyJustin HallJordan CraneJohnny RyanJim WoodringJasonJames RombergerJaime HernandezHans RickheitGilbert Hernandezdigital comicsDavid WojnarowiczDash ShawcomiXologyChris Wright 12 Mar 2013 12:44 PM

Since Fantagraphics and comiXology shook hands that fateful weekend last summer, the hits just keep a-galloping through the gate. Here are the books we have kickin' around in our digital stable ready to be rode hard, combed down and fed oats (in the form of your high-star ratings).

Here's a run-down of the digital comics we currently have available to read on your tablets, iPads, eReaders, myPads, ThinkTouches and more. Click on titles to be taken to their page at comiXology.

Life is Rough and Tales of Misspent Youth

Cruisin' with the Hound7 Miles a Second
Cruisin' with the Hound
by Spain Rodriguez
7 Miles a Second by David Wojnarowicz, James Romberger, and Marguerite Van Cook

Memoirs of the artist's misspent youth. Raunchy, hilarious, and often violent as hell, an unsentimentally nostalgic trip to half a century ago — the anti- Happy Days, set to a true rock ’n’ roll beat. - See more at: http://www.fantagraphics.com/index.php?keyword=cruisin%27+with+the+hound&search_type=titles&Search=Search&Itemid=62&option=com_virtuemart&page=shop.browse#sthash.zYJMZj3B.dpuf7 Miles a Second by David Wojnarowicz, James Romberger and Marguerite Van Cook.

Night Fisher Bottomless Belly Button 
Night Fisher
by R. Kikuo Johnson
Bottomless Belly Button
by Dash Shaw

Tales to scare you, like rip your face off scary

Folly The Grave Robber's Daughter
Folly
by Hans Rickheit
The Grave Robber's Daughter by Richard Sala

Dark tales on a journey

Black Lung Weathercraft
Blacklung
by Chris Wright
Weathercraft by Jim Woodring

Michael Kupperman's comedy hour: Tales Designed to Thrizzle 

 Tales Designed to Thrizzle Vol. 1 Tales Designed to Thrizzle Vol. 2
Tales Designed to Thrizzle Vol. One
by Michael Kupperman
Tales Designed to Thrizzle Vol. Two by Michael Kupperman
Individual issues of Tales Designed to Thrizzle also available

Johnny Ryan's yukks, chuckles and face punches

Prison Pit 1 Prison Pit 2
Prison Pit: Book One
by Johnny Ryan
Prison Pit: Book Two by Johnny Ryan

 Prison Pit 3 Prison Pit 4
Prison Pit: Book Three
by Johnny Ryan
Prison Pit: Book Four by Johnny Ryan

Angry Youth Comix
Angry Youth Comix Issues 1-14
by Johnny Ryan

Historical and Presidential comics

The Hypo Barack Hussein Obama
The Hypo: The Melancholic Young Lincoln
by Noah Van Sciver
Barack Hussein Obama by Steven Weissman
No Straight Lines Oil and Water
No Straight Line: Four Decades of Queer Comics
edited by Justin Hall
Oil and Water by Steve Duin and Shannon Wheeler

Love and Rockets' Palomar series by Gilbert Hernandez

  Heartbreak SoupHuman Diastrophism
Heartbreak Soup (Love and Rockets: Palomar Book 1)
by Gilbert Hernandez
Human Diastrophism (Love and Rockets: Palomar Book 2) by Gilbert Hernandez

Beyond PalomarAmor Y Cohetes
Beyond Palomar (Love and Rockets: Palomar Book 3)
by Gilbert Hernandez
Amor Y Cohetes by Gilbert and Jaime Hernandez

Love and Rockets' Locas series by Jaime Hernandez

 Maggie the Mechanic The Girl from H.O.P.P.E.R.S.
Maggie the Mechanic
by Jaime Hernandez
The Girl from H.O.P.P.E.R.S. (Love and Rockets: Locas Book 2) by Jaime Hernandez

Perla La Loca Penny Century
Perla La Loca
(Love and Rockets: Locas Book 3)
by Jaime Hernandez
Penny Century (Love and Rockets: Locas Book 4) by Jaime Hernandez

Esperanza Amor Y Cohetes
Esperanza (Love and Rockets: Locas Book 5)
by Jaime Hernandez
Amor Y Cohetes by Jaime Hernandez

Love and Rockets New Stories

  Love and Rockets New StoriesLove and Rockets: New Stories #5
Love and Rockets New Stories: #1-5
by Jaime and Gilbert Hernandez

God and Science
God and Science: Return of the Ti-Girls
by Jaime Hernandez

A new take on Fairy Tales

 Castle Waiting Vol. 1 Delphine
Castle Waiting Vol. 1
by Linda Medley
Delphine by Richard Sala

The Hidden
The Hidden
by Richard Sala

Jason. The Jason

Werewolves of Montpellier I Killed Adolf Hitler
Werewolves of Montpellier
by Jason
I Killed Adolf Hitler by Jason

One Man Anthologies

 Abandoned Cars Happy Hour in America
Abandoned Cars
by Tim Lane
Happy Hour in America by Tim Lane

Uptight Uptight
Uptight
by Jordan Crane

Kidppropriate!

The Adventures of Venus
The Adventures of Venus
by Gilbert Hernandez

Note that most of these books are available at your local comic book store or our website in print form but we know you have to save that shelf space. Every Wednesday we have 1-2 new digital releases, sometimes same-day releases as the book. Buy a book for yourself or someone you love today.

 

Daily OCD 3/7/13
Written by Jen Vaughn | Filed under Richard SalaNo Straight LinesNancyJustin HallJulia GfrörerJohnny GruelleJames RombergerJacques TardiGary GrothErnie BushmillerDavid WojnarowiczDaily OCDChuck ForsmanChris WrightAlexander Theroux 7 Mar 2013 4:24 PM

The first peak of sun of Online Commentaries & Diversions:

7 Miles a Second

• Review: Noah Berlatsky on Slate reviews 7 Miles a Second by David Wojnarowicz, James Romberger, and Marguerite Van Cook. "That feared and desired encounter is in part the collision of comics and art—but it's also, and emphatically, the intermingling of queer and straight…7 Miles a Second still represents a road largely avoided…even if 7 Miles a Second never went mainstream, this new edition remains a stirring reminder that everything pushed to the side isn't gone."

• Review: Full Page Bleed and Tom Murphy read 7 Miles a Second by David Wojnarowicz, James Romberger, and Marguerite Van Cook. "Like David Wojnarowicz's vision of himself, this is a volume that has an impossible amount of energy and emotion packed into its slim dimensions. It's a blistering book that, having been revived by Fantagraphics in the format it deserves, should now take its rightful place in the comics/graphic memoir canon."

Delphine

• Review: The North Adams Transcript blog reviewed Delphine by Richard Sala. "Prince Charming’s journey is creepy and jarring, and the trappings of the likes of the Grimm Brothers take on a heightened presentation that becomes more personal than you would ever expect them to be," John Seven.

The Grammar of Rock

• Plug: The D&Q bookstore is ready to read prose book The Grammar of Rock by Alexander Theroux. Jade writes, "Cliché lyrics, diva meltdowns, and inarticulate diction are all up for close examination in Theroux’s comprehensive exploration of language in pop, rock, jazz, folk, soul, and yes, even rap (Ghostface Killah!)."

No Straight Lines

• Plug: LAMBDA announces nominees for awards and includes Justin Hall's No Straight Lines. Lambda Literary Awards celebrate achievement in lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender (LGBT) writing for books published in 2012. More information here!

Love from the Shadows

• Review: The Savage Critic looks at Gilbert Hernandez's Love from the Shadows. "It’s the work of a comics master tearing into the stained brown paper parcel of his unconscious, and finding a piping hot slurry composed of decades of pop culture detritus."

Nancy Likes Christmas

• Plug: The Daily Optimist shows off a few panels of Nancy Likes Christmas by Ernie Bushmiller. Dan Wagstaff writes, "I do have a strange and peculiar love of Ernie Bushmiller’s ‘Nancy’ comic strips… Fantagraphics are doing a great job of collecting them properly into books (designed by Jacob Covey)."

• Plug: Tom Heintjes on Cartoonician gives a short and concise history of Fritzi Ritz aka Aunt Fritzi from Ernie Bushmiller's Nancy. She was the star of her own strip before that created by Larry Whittington. "A young cartoonist named Ernie Bushmiller took the reins and went with his strength: the simple gags that would forever earn both the scorn and admiration of millions of comics fans."

Gary Groth

• Interview: The Comics Reporter and Tom Spurgeon interviews Publisher Gary Groth: "I can look at most books and come up with a pretty accurate estimate as to how it will sell. Occasionally I'm wrong."

Chris Wright's Black Lung Black is the Color

• Plug: Fantagraphics fan and friend, JT Dockery has a fundraising campaign/pre-order for his Despair book which features art from Chris Wright and Julia Gfrörer. I hope they are on a ship.

The End of the Fucking World

• Plug: Sam Costello at Full Stop lists The End of the Fucking World by Charles Forsman as one of the most anticipated books of 2013. "While there’s certainly violence and horror here, Forsman handles the subject as a character study, not a lurid glorification, making James sympathetic and his deeds all the more monstrous."

Mr. Twee Deedle

• Review: Michael May reviews Mr. Twee Deedle by Johnny Gruelle on School Library Journal. In reference to Good Comics for Kids, "There’s plenty for children to enjoy in the collection, but parents and educators will be even more rewarded. Not only by the history and context that Marschall provides, but by the sheer sweetness and transportive beauty of the illustrations as well. Each of the full-page, full-color strips is something not only to linger over, but to revisit often."

West Coast Blues

• Review: The Weekly Crisis looks at West Coast Blues by Jacques Tardi. "The narrative is almost a ‘dark twin’ of Hitchcock’s North by Northwest as George is forced to adapt and go on the run as the forces arrayed against him close in."

• Plug: Jessica Abel posted some cool ideas on visual scripting and laying out your ideas she learned from Alison Bechdel. 

This Week in Fantagraphics Events: 2/25-3/4
Written by janice headley | Filed under Ron Regé JrPeter BaggeMichel GagneMichael KuppermanJames RombergerJack KirbyeventsEllen ForneyBill Schelly 25 Feb 2013 10:30 AM

Monday, February 25th

New York City, NY: Tonight! James Romberger gives a slide show presentation on 7 Miles a Second at the NY Comics and Picture-story Symposium! Starting at 7:00 PM! (more info)

Tuesday, February 26th

•  Brooklyn, NY:  Join the mighty Michael Kupperman at Book Court for the book launch celebration of Tales Designed to Thrizzle, Vol. 2, with special guest Ted Travelstead! (more info)

Wednesday, February 27th

•  Seattle, WA:  The Richard Hugo House presents an evening of original music inspired by Ellen Forney's 2007 collection Lust: Kinky Online Personal Ads from Seattle's The Stranger! Doors and bar at 7:00 PM. Showtime at 8:00 PM. (more info)

Friday, March 1st

•  Seattle, WA:  It's the first day of Emerald City Comicon! Today, our special guest Peter Bagge will be signing from 4:00 to 6:00 PM! (more info)

Saturday, March 2nd

•  Seattle, WA:  More, more, more Emerald City Comicon! Today, we'll be joined by special guests Bill Schelly, Peter Bagge, Ellen Forney, and Michel Gagné! (more info)

•  New York City, NY:  It's your last chance to check out the The Pen-Ultimate Arnold Roth: 60 Years (and Counting) As a Freelance at the Museum of Comic and Cartoon Art! Exhibit closes today! (more info)

Sunday, March 3rd

•  Seattle, WA:  It's the final day of Emerald City Comicon! No special guests, but lotsa very special comics! Come say hi to Larry and the gang at Booth 510. (more info)

•  Portland, OR:  It's your last day to check out the exhibit Fighting Men: Leon Golub, Peter Voulkos, and Jack Kirby at the Ronna and Eric Hoffman Gallery of Contemporary Art! (more info)

Ron Rege

Monday, March 4th

•  Gainesville, Florida:  The magic begins as our own Ron Regé, Jr. will begin a week-long intensive workshop at SAW, the Sequential Artists Workshop! (more info)

James Romberger at the NY Comics and Picture-story Symposium
Written by Jen Vaughn | Filed under James RombergereventsDavid WojnarowiczArf 25 Feb 2013 9:02 AM

Post York/7 Miles a Second

James Romberger, artist of 7 Miles a Second, will be giving a slide show presentation tonight TONIGHT at the NY Comics and Picture-story Symposium on his collaboration with David Wojnarowicz and Marguerite Van Cook in addition to his new book Post York, out from Uncivilized Books. 7pm, 7 Miles a Second pretty easy to remember. Music accompaniment by Crosby. The thirty-fourth meeting of the NY Comics & Picture-story Symposium will be held on Monday, February 25, 2013 at 7:00 pm at Parsons The New School, 2 West 13th Street in The Bark Room (off lobby). See you there!

7 Miles a Second downloads at about the same speed on comiXology
Written by Jen Vaughn | Filed under James Rombergerdigital comicsDavid WojnarowiczcomiXology 20 Feb 2013 12:35 PM

7 Miles a Second at comiXology

Digital Release Wednesday brings you a hot title that is finally seeing the light of day with proper coloring. Fantagraphics and comiXology bring you 7 Miles a Second by David Wojnarowicz, James Romberger, and Marguerite Van Cook, now a NY Times Best Seller in hardcover.

7 Miles a Second is the story of legendary artist David Wojnarowicz, written during the last years before his AIDS-related death in 1992. Artists Romberger and Van Cook unsentimentally depict Wojnarowicz's childhood of hustling on the streets of Manhattan, through his adulthood living with AIDS, and his anger at the indifference of government and health agencies. A primal scream of a graphic novel, 7 Miles a Second blends the stark reality of Lower East Side street life with a psychedelic delirium that artfully conveys Wojnarowicz's sense of rage, urgency, mortality and a refusal to be silent.

7MAS preview

"The author’s prose is poetic, arriving with a light touch while delivering a heavy, dark, and understandably angry message." – Publishers Weekly

  "Part of the power of Wojnarowicz’s work is that he dealt with such concepts accessibly; he didn’t have time to waste. It was the source of his restless imagination, his willingness to experiment with unexpected forms." – David L. Ulin, LA Times

"Romberger painfully captures the frailty of forms and tenderness of touch, but equally the delirium of David’s mad fucking visions and dreams. Marguerite Van Cook’s colours are virtually toxic…This is not a beautiful book; it’s an ugly book, a brilliant book, a Last Will & Testament which I hope you will hear." – Stephen L. Holland, Page 45

Daily OCD: 2/19/13
Written by Jen Vaughn | Filed under Wilfred SantiagoTom KaczynskiThe Comics JournalRichard SalaPeter BaggeNoah Van SciverMoto HagioMichel GagneMichael KuppermanLove and RocketsJames RombergerGary PanterDisneyDavid WojnarowiczDaily OCDcomics journalCarl Barks 19 Feb 2013 2:26 PM

The fullest mailbox of Online Commentaries & Diversions:

Delphine

• Interview: Alex Dueben interviews Richard Sala about Delphine on CBR . "The main story, which is depicted with ruled borders, was always linear. But I allowed myself more room with the main character's inner life. All of that -- the memories, dreams, fantasies, wishful thinking -- all of that is depicted in panels with soft, cloud-like, non-ruled borders. And so I was able to add to the character's inner life -- his thoughts and fears and confusion -- as I went along." And, edit to the article, we also have The Hidden and The Grave Robber's Daughter available at comiXology.

Michael Jordan: Bull on Parade

• Interview: Wilfred Santiago is interviewed by Christopher Borelli about Bull on Parade for the Chicago Tribune and Michael Jordan's 50th birthday. "[Santiago] said a graphic novel seemed like a perfect medium for exploiting athleticism, then added: 'But also, Jordan, as a figure, never seemed that interested in satisfying people. Which is interesting to me.'"

TCJ 302 TCJ 301

• Plug: Tom Spurgeon on the Comics Reporter talks about TCJ 302, edited by Gary Groth, Kristy Valenti and Michael Dean. "There's an amazing Roy Crane section in there that's as good as you can imagine practical advice from a practical-minded comics craft master being. The Sendak is hilarious and sad." Spurgeon gives a review for TCJ 301 as well. "Publishing Groth's big interviews in print like this is an effective use of one of comics' most versatile thinkers and aiming a very good and only intermittent writer like Kreider at something as odd yet Journal-appropriate as the entirety of Cerebus seems to me fine editorial planning."

 7 Miles a Second Beta Testing the Apocalypse

• Review: Page 45 reviews 7 Miles a Second by David Wajnarowicz, James Romberger and Marguerite Van Cook. "Romberger painfully captures the frailty of forms and tenderness of touch, but equally the delirium of David’s mad fucking visions and dreams. Marguerite Van Cook’s colours are virtually toxic…This is not a beautiful book; it’s an ugly book, a brilliant book, a Last Will & Testament which I hope you will hear," writes Stephen L. Holland.

• Interview: James Romberger interviews Tom Kaczynski about Beta Testing the Apocalypse on the Hooded Utilitarian. Kaczynski made a list, we love those: "Overall I can cite 3 primary ways I use color in the book.
1. Color as a naturalistic element (as lighting, depth, etc.)
2. Color as pure design element.
3. Color as information
."

The Heart of Thomas

• Review: Julien of the D&Q Bookstore is excited to read Moto Hagio's The Heart of Thomas. "Like the other Magnificent 49ers (the legendary first wave of female comic artists), Hagio's work is fearlessly avant-garde and visually stunning. Over her fruitful and now slightly less under-translated career, she has set the bar for all manga artists to follow, up to this day, and not just shonen-ai or shoujo mangaka."

Tales Designed to Thrizzle Vol. 2 Dal Tokyo

• Review: Publishers Weekly loves Tales Designed to Thrizzle Vol. 2 by Michael Kupperman. "Kupperman deploys a stunning arsenal of art styles to bring home the laughs, from stilted woodcut art to a kind of Tintin lite…Kupperman is pretty much his own genre of humor now."

• Interview: Gary Panter was interviewed by Nick Gazin on VICE on Dal Tokyo, creativity and other fun. Gazin describes the book, "…trying to follow the story like it was a traditional comic is hard it feels like we're seeing the inside of Panter's brain. We go where he wants to take us and the landscape reflects his current mood and interests. Not everybody can do whatever they feel like and make it as interesting as this book." 

Donald Duck: Lost in the Andes Uncle Scrooge Donald Duck: A Christmas for Shacktown

• Plug: Jeff Kinney from Diary of a Wimpy Kid reminisces about his father and their shared love of Carl Bark's duck comics at Disney Dads. Kinney says, "I consider [Carl Bark's comics] to be the best form of storytelling I’ve ever read. My father always made sure to leave the comics page open in the newspaper in the morning so we kids could read them. I think that without my father, I wouldn’t have ended up on the career path that I’m on.

Young Romance

• Review: Johanna Draper Carlson reviews Young Romance edited by Michel Gagné on Comics Worth Reading. "It’s neat to read these long-ago tales of girls acting out of jealousy or determining how to make the right love decision in such an easy-to-hold hardcover with restored coloring. I love seeing more of this forgotten period of comic history, particularly since it was so widely popular and yet so ignored these days," writes Carlson.

Love and Rockets

• Plug: Jim Hanley's Universe blog creates The Definitive Love & Rockets Reading Guide and Full Bibliography by Jeffrey O. Gustafson to whet your appetite for our Love and Rockets Companion and Reader. "Featuring mature, character based stories, the quality in art and story of the work of [Hernandez brothers] represent the high-water mark of independent, creator-owned comics, indeed comics period."

 Peter Bagge  

• Plug: Peter Bagge 'hates' on Beavis and Butthead in this month's MAD magazine, reported by Paste.

Noah Van Sciver

• Plug: Noah Van Sciver continues the funny at Denver Westword with the 10 biggest buzzkills at a concert. Read this and laugh or maybe recognize the horrible person that you are.

7 Miles a Second: NY Times Bestseller
Written by Jen Vaughn | Filed under James RombergerDavid WojnarowiczDaily OCD 18 Feb 2013 10:32 AM

7 Miles a Second

On Friday, the hard-hitting graphic novel 7 Miles a Second by David Wojnarowicz, James Romberger and Marguerite Van Cook hit the New York Times Best Seller's List at #5. As profiled by George Gene Gustines "It chronicles his life as a young hustler on the streets of New York City." Check out the vibrant story of a man in the midst of the AIDS crisis coming to terms with his anger and impending death.

Daily OCD 2/12/13
Written by Jen Vaughn | Filed under Tom KaczynskiThe Comics JournalNico VassilakisMichael KuppermanLilli CarréLast VispoJames RombergerEd PiskorDavid WojnarowiczDaily OCDCrag Hillcomics journal 12 Feb 2013 8:42 PM

The most evolved finch of Online Commentaries & Diversions:

Beta Testing the Apocalypse

• Review: Tom Kaczynski's Best Testing the Apocalypse is reviewed on  Bookslut. Martyn Pedler states, "Science fiction is notoriously unreliable when it comes to predicting Saturn dreams, laser beams, and 21st century sex machines. It’s fantastic, however, at taking our present reality and making it strange again. Beta Testing The Apocalypse makes us Martians to better let us see what’s happening all around us. Read it and witness the disquieting Gernsback of Now."

 
• Review: Beta Testing The Apocalypse is reviewed by Comics Metropolis. "…a book with an elegant and agile format, immediate in its communicative ability, and extraordinarily dense in its content. An essential reading," writes Biri.
Tales Designed to Thrizzle Vol. 2
• Interview (audio): Michael Kupperman speaks to Julie Klausner on How Was Your Week.
Heads or Tails
 • Review (audio): The Inkstuds roundtable talks about the Best Books of 2012. Joe McCulloch, Robin McConnell, Tom Spurgeon and Bill Kartalopoulos talk about Lilli Carré's Heads or Tails at the 2 hour, 2 minutes mark. All agreed there was a lot of work. And good work. "Lilli is very good at short stories," says Bill. " 'The Rainbow Movement' was a beautiful short story and exquisite."
7 Miles a Second
• Review: In case you missed it, 7 Miles A Second was a Publishers Weekly Pick of the Week. "How do you draw grief"? David Wajnarowicz, James Romberger and Marguerite Van Cook know. "The author’s prose is poetic, arriving with a light touch while delivering a heavy, dark, and understandably angry message."
 
• Interview: Originally posted on The Comics Journal, then reposted on  Boing Boing, Marc Sobel speaks to Ed Piskor at length. In regards to Hip Hop Family Tree, Piskor states, "I think the value that my book has and will have over time as I keep moving forward is that it really does stand a chance of being one of the most comprehensive histories of hip hop culture. There really isn’t one resource that includes all of this minutiae and stuff that I’m focusing on."
TCJ 302
 • Plug: Jade at the D & Q bookstore is ready to sell you TCJ 302!
The Last Vispo
• Plug: The Poetry Foundation revisits The Last Vispo after reading another review. "We’re still reading and looking through our copy, enjoying the sheer abundance and diversity of work gathered together," writes Harriet Staff.
 
• Interview (audio): Gary Groth appears for a full hour on TELL ME SOMETHING I DON'T KNOW now on Boing Boing. Hold onto your comics, it's a great ride. 
 









Daily OCD 2/6/2013
Written by Jen Vaughn | Filed under Wally WoodTom KaczynskiThe Comics JournalSteven BrowerSpain RodriguezspainShimura TakakoRon Regé JrRichard SalaMoto HagioMort MeskinLove and RocketsLilli CarréJustin HallJoost SwarteJames RombergerJaime HernandezHarvey KurtzmanGilbert HernandezEd PiskorEC ComicsDavid WojnarowiczDash ShawDaily OCDChuck ForsmanCharles M SchulzCharles Burns 6 Feb 2013 11:45 PM

The most intricate house sigil of Online Commentaries & Diversions:

7 Miles a Second  Beta Testing the Apocalypse

• Review: The LA Times enjoys their reading of 7 Miles a Second by David Wojnarowicz, James Romberger and Marguerite Van Cook. "Part of the power of Wojnarowicz’s work is that he dealt with such concepts accessibly; he didn’t have time to waste. It was the source of his restless imagination, his willingness to experiment with unexpected forms," writes David L. Ulin.

• Plug: NY1 (New York 1) and Don Kois talk about 7 Miles a Second David Wojnarowicz, James Romberger and Marguerite Van Cook. "…this graphic novel is an amazing document of the gaudy, dangerous world of clients and johns and artists and thugs downtown in the 1980s."

• Interview: Nick Hanover of Comics Bulletin interviews Tom Kaczynski on Beta Testing the Apocalypse. Kacyznski writes, "All these stories started to feel like they were linked and eventually things like the noise stories and the themes of sound started to kind of inject themselves into the rest of the materialI'm interested in utopias, and utopian societies. And a lot of what Communism is is essentially an attempted utopia that failed. "

Wandering Son   Wandering Son Vol.3

• Review:  Terry Hong of the Smithsonian Asian Pacific American Center writes about Wandering Son Vols. 2 and 3 by Shimura Takako. "The discordant contrast of Shimura’s winsome visuals against the sharp growing pains of her tweenagers imbues her series with urgent solemnity."

Delphine Heads or Tails

• Review: Art Rocker and Wee Claire look at Delphine by Richard Sala. "Delphine is arguably Richard Sala's darkest tale to date and a brilliant gateway for those new to his whimsical storytelling style…There are comparisons to Snow White dotted throughout the story but Sala's indie-goth execution tinged with a 70s horror atmosphere make for a much more interesting tale."

• Review: The Toronto Star reads and reviews our books like Heads or Tails by Lilli Carré. "Carré’s work, fittingly titled Heads or Tails, probes choice, ambivalence and fate; in her stories, there’s a flip side to everything, rendered in full and brilliant colour,"says Laura Kane.

• Review: Noah Bertlatsky on the Hooded Utilitarian looks at the art of Lilli Carré comics from Heads or Tails through the gendered lens of Bart Beaty. "If art is both hyperbolic masculine swagger and small-scale feminized detail, though, for Carré the form that mediates between the two is something that looks a lot like comics."

TJ 302 cover

• Interview (partial): Dan Nadel of The Comics Journal posts part of the interview of Jacqes Tardi by Kim Thompson from TCJ 302.

• Plug: "It's astonishing to me that The Comics Journal will have outlasted Wizard, Hero Illustrated and CBG, but I'm happy for that fact," says former TCJ editor, Tom Spurgeon. TCJ 302 was co-edited by Kristy Valenti and Mike Dean.

From Shadow to Light Out of the Shadows  

• Review: Mort Meskin gets the full hello-how-are-ya when his collections are reviewed, edited by Steven Brower. "Out of the Shadows was such an enjoyable find that when it ended we were hungry for more of Meskin’s work." So Scoop turns to From Shadow to Light, "Meskin is so skilled in portraying body language that he doesn’t need a face to tell us know exactly what someone is thinking…a thorough and very detailed look at a man’s life, his family and the work he valued.

• Plug: Spain Rodriguez and Mort Meskin have been automatically inducted into the Eisner Hall of Fame as posted on The Beat. And of course, Fantagraphics will be at San Diego Comic Con with copies of their books, Cruisin' with the Hound and Out of the Shadows. Other Fantagraphics' greats have been nominated as well like Trina Robbins , Bill Griffith, Jacques Tardi and Gary Panter.

Peanuts Every Sunday The End of the Fucking World

• Plug: Kotaku and Evan Narcisse get teary-eyed over Peanuts Every Sunday by Charles M. Schulz. "The daily black-and-white comics were great but the full-color Sunday strips gave Schulz a big, beautiful canvas to let his expert pacing and amazing linework breathe in a rainbow of color…it's really the entire mix of characters …and their mix of adult prickliness and childlike naiveté that made Charles Schulz's iconic comics strips so timeless."

• Interview: MTV Geek interviews Charles Forsman about The End of the Fucking World and life. Forsman answers Eddie Wright's question, "I do love sparse cartooning. Like Schulz which I think comes through in mine a bit. I've heard people descibe this stuff as "Peanuts" all grown-up and violent."

Hip Hop Family Tree

• Review: Nerds of a Feather look at Ed Piskor's Hip Hop Family Tree, to be printed later this year. Philippe Duhart gives it a rare 10 out of 10, "…those familiar with the genre can attest, it's difficult to separate the music from other elements of the "culture" -- b-boying, graffiti, lingo, style. Piskor demonstrates an affectionate respect for the interrelations between these phenomenon, telling a story of a culture, rather than a musical genre."

The Heart of Thomas New School

• Review: Anime News Network reviews and givest The Heart of Thomas by Moto Hagio an 'A-'. Rebecca Silverman writes, "The Heart of Thomas may be the grandmother of the boys' love genre, but it would be shortsighted to simply classify it as such…Heartfelt and dreamlike, it is a window into the lives of those affected by the sudden death of one of their own."

• Plug: Publishers Weekly lists their top 10 most anticipated books of the spring. Dash Shaw's New School makes the list. They also mention Good Dog; Wake Up, Percy Gloom; Lost Cat; and Fran.

The Cartoon Utopia

• Review: The Toronto Star reads and reviews our books like The Cartoon Utopia by Ron Regé, Jr. The Cartoon Utopia "is visionary, but also unmistakably influenced by ’70s psychedelia… the thrilling, one-of-a-kind art will stretch your imagination and, at the very least, make you believe in the power of comics to explore the impossible," writes Laura Kane.

Corpse on the Imjin! Came the Dawn

• Review: The Toronto Star reads and reviews our books like Came the Dawn by Wallace Wood and Corpse on the Imjin! by Harvey Kurtzman. Laura Kane writes, "In dark shadows, bold lines and intense close-ups, [Wallace Wood] perfectly illustrates the stories — which ran the gamut from B-horror to confronting social issues such as racism, anti-Semitism and sexism." As for Corpse on the Imjin!, "In these violent, blood-spattered pages, [Kurtzman] lays bare the devastation of war."

• Review/Commentary: Eddie Campbell on The Comics Journal compares and contrasts recent reviews of the EC Comics being reprinted at Fantagraphics and how critics struggle and feel the need to analyze comics at literature. Distilling the article to a mere quote is abhorrent so we tried but please read it. "If comics are any kind of art at all, it’s the art of ordinary people. With regard to Kurtzman’s war comics, don’t forget that the artists on those books were nearer to the real thing than you and I will ever be."

No Straight Lines Love and Rockets New Stories 4 Joost Swarte

• Review: Elliot Bay Books reviews No Straight Lines, edited by Justin Hall. Dave Wheeler writes, "Impossible to be even close to a complete collection of the genre, No Straight Lines instead seeks to trace the parallel trajectories toward visibility for both comics and LGBTQ identities…these are the stories of real people, or they are people transfigured by folklore."

• Plug: Greg Akers of the Memphis Flyer enjoyed reading Love and Rockets: New Stories #4 by Jaime Hernandez and Gilbert Hernandez. "Jaime breaks me every time. The conclusion to "The Love Bunglers" is an all-time great. Tears in my eyes, destroyed emotionally."

• Plug: Joost Swarte sings the blues at Angouleme, thanks to Paul Karasik.

Black Hole

• Review: SequArt looks at Black Hole by Charles Burns. Faith Brody Patane point out "…it’s a story that’s meant to be devoured with intent to possibly make you have freaky nightmares. Black Hole is one of those stories that lingers long after you read it…This group of teens is far from Riverdale and far more desperate."