Home arrow Browse Shop

Search / Login

Quick Links:
Latest Releases
Browse by Artist
Love and Rockets Guide
Peanuts books
Disney books
More browsing options under "Browse Shop" above


Search: All Titles

Advanced Search
Login / Free Registration
Detail Search
Download Area
Show Cart
Your Cart is currently empty.

Subscribe

Sign up for our email newsletters for updates on new releases, events, special deals and more.

New Releases

Unlovable Vol. 3
Unlovable Vol. 3
$29.99
Add to Cart

Buddy Buys a Dump: The Complete Buddy Bradley Stories from "Hate" Comics Vol. 3 (2000-2013)
Buddy Buys a Dump: The Complete Buddy Bradley Stories from
$19.99
Add to Cart

Buz Sawyer Vol. 3: Typhoons and Honeymoons
Buz Sawyer Vol. 3: Typhoons and Honeymoons
$39.99
Add to Cart

The Love Bunglers
The Love Bunglers
$19.99
Add to Cart

all new releases

Category >> Jason

Things to See: Jason's new work in progress
Written by Mike Baehr | Filed under Things to seeJasonComing Attractions 7 Nov 2011 4:32 PM

detective story panel by Jason

At his blog Jason has begun posting panels from his new as-yet-untitled book in progress, saying "For the moment it looks like it will be around 150-160 pages. So I guess this will be my first graphic novel. That means I'm a... I'm a... graphic novelist! Woo hoo!" The dialogue above translates as "Fucking hell..."

[Follow our Tumblr blog for lots more Things to See every day.]

 

Daily OCD: 11/2/11
Written by Mike Baehr | Filed under reviewsRay FenwickPaul NelsonKevin HuizengaKevin AveryJasonDavid BDaily OCD 2 Nov 2011 6:35 PM

Today's Online Commentary & Diversions:

The Armed Garden and Other Stories

Review: "This slim volume is finely edited, and its narrative tone resides on the border between fairy stories and unbowdlerized folk tales. In other words, it is suffused with equal dismay and delight at the nature of the world. The drawings, printed in two crisp colors, would be worth the price of the book if it were stripped of words. Like Craig Thompson’s Habibi (which it precedes in its original publication date, pre-translation) and Umberto Eco’s Baudolino, it has a great deal of wonder in it, which it conveys in a surprisingly matter-of-fact way. Do note that the book is full of penises and violence (and I mean full), so you may not want to buy it for your ten-year-old niece, but if you are still under the spell of story, The Armed Garden will delight you." – Hillary Brown, Paste

 Everything Is an Afterthought: The Life and Writings of Paul Nelson

Review (Audio): On Albany NY public radio station WAMC, Jacqueline Kellachan of The Golden Notebook discusses Everything Is an Afterthought: The Life and Writings of Paul Nelson (at the 8:55 mark in the streaming audio — we'll have a transcription of some highlights soon)

What I Did

Reviews: Cosmic Treadmill begins their survey of the complete works of Jason with Hey, Wait... ("What starts out as a series of cute and fun moments of the protagonist’s childhood turns into one of the most memorable comic book moments I can think of.... This should be on everyone’s to-read list"), Sshhhh! ("utterly engrossing... another quite memorable book"), and The Iron Wagon ("Full of deceit, paranoia and some great characterisation, The Iron Wagon won’t soon be forgotten") — all of which are collected in What I Did

Mascots

Plug: "I loved [Mascots], and if you're the kind of person that this kind of thing might appeal to, I highly recommend it. It lands a tricky acrobatic mix of poetry, graphic design, painting, and general sketchbook goofballery." – Kevin Huizenga\

Daily OCD: 10/27/11
Written by Mike Baehr | Filed under No Straight LinesJasonJack JacksoninterviewsGreg SadowskiDaily OCDComing AttractionsBasil Wolverton 27 Oct 2011 6:08 PM

Today's Online Commentary & Diversions:

Jason

Interview: Dan Wagstaff, a.k.a. The Casual Optimist, has a Q&A with Jason: "I have ideas in my brain, just lying there, that I sometimes think about. This can last years. Then suddenly I can get ideas for dialogues. I write this down. It’s maybe four or five pages. I can start working on those, and at the same time think about what’s going to happen next. I don’t write a full script. It’s based on improvisation. I write pieces of dialogue. Or sometimes I sketch out the pages first, the images, and write the dialogue after. I usually work on nine or ten pages at the same time, pencil a bit here , then ink it, and then pencil a bit there and ink that. It’s the completely wrong way of doing it, by the way, but it seems to be the only way I can work."

Plugs: Martha Cornog of Library Journal spotlights a few of our upcoming releases in the latest "Graphic Novels Prepub Alert":

Creeping Death from Neptune

Creeping Death from Neptune: Horror and Science Fiction Comics by Basil Wolverton: "The line between horror and humor dissolves easily, and Wolverton's extravagantly grotesque drawings drew chortles and chills from readers of MAD magazine and numerous comics from the 1940s to the 1950s.... Now a few years after a successful New York exhibit plus several published collections of illustrations and shorter pieces, this volume reprints important sf/horror sequential work, carefully restored, plus material from his personal ledgers and diaries."

 Jack Jackson's American History: Los Tejanos & Lost Cause [

Jack Jackson's American History: Los Tejanos & Lost Cause: "With the pen name of 'Jaxon,' Jackson (1941-2006) drew Texas history into comics that included Mexican as well as Anglo legacies. Los Tejanos ('the Texans' of Mexican ancestry) fixes on Juan Seguín, a tragic figure in the 1835-75 Texas-Mexican conflict. Lost Cause chronicles the state's turmoil during Reconstruction, in the wake of the Civil War. Jackson's detailed, realistically drawn accounts will be useful for anyone interested in those coordinates of U.S. history or in Latino-Anglo heritage."

No Straight Lines: Four Decades of Queer Comics [February 2012]

No Straight Lines: Four Decades of Queer Comics: "Herewith a color and black-and-white sampler from a little-recognized underground of gay comics from the past four decades, including [Alison] Bechdel and [Howard] Cruse, Europe's Ralf Koenig, and 2011 ALA keynoter Dan Savage. Huh? Dan Savage wrote comics?! Indeedy, indeedy. Fantagraphics promises 'smart, funny, and profound' — and uncensored."

Daily OCD: 10/24/11
Written by Mike Baehr | Filed under The Comics JournalT Edward BakRoy CraneRichard SalareviewsPaul NelsonMoto HagiomangaLove and RocketsLos Bros HernandezLeslie SteinKevin AveryJasonJaime HernandezinterviewsHo Che AndersonGreg SadowskiGilbert HernandezGary PanterDaily OCDCaptain EasyAlex Toth 25 Oct 2011 1:24 AM

Today's Online Commentary & Diversions:

Eye of the Majestic Creature

Review/Interview: "Leslie Stein is a pretty lady who made a comic [Eye of the Majestic Creature] in which she is a cute/gross little humanoid with eyes that are like coins and a best friend who is a guitar. Her comical alter ego is named Larry Bear and her guitar's name is Marshy. They live in a house in a field, but it's pretty clear that almost everything they experience is some joked-up fantasized autobiographical story. It's hard to know what's based on reality and what isn't, and which characters are based on real folks and which are just supposed to be Leslie's internal feelings personified.... Leslie's work communicates an urban loneliness that I relate to a lot, seeing as we live in the same place. It's cute and sad and familiar, especially if you're 30 or under." – Nick Gazin, who also talks to Leslie at Vice: "I think for the most part she represents the lighter side of my personality. I'm happy when I'm drawing and I hope that comes across through her on the page, in whatever situation she is in. She dresses a bit weirder than I do, so that's fun. I'm not really a shy person, but I feel like I'm constantly embarrassing myself. She doesn't have that self-consciousness."

The Hidden

Review: "Post-apocalyptic stories tend to be grim, but The Hidden is very dark indeed.... The book feels like a modern-day gothic horror. The survivors are metaphors for humanity, with a heroic few battling an onslaught of monsters, human or otherwise. Humanity is on the brink of extinction, and still people bring out the worst in one another.... Sala’s illustration is compelling... ★★★★ [out of 5]" – Grovel

 Everything Is an Afterthought: The Life and Writings of Paul Nelson

Review: "[Kevin] Avery’s book, Everything Is an Afterthought: The Life and Writings of Paul Nelson, is an admirably unorthodox construction that starts with a bracing 180-page biography of Paul followed by a 265 page collection of Nelson’s music writing, primarily that from the seventies focusing on the artists he was particularly drawn to.... What’s impressive about Avery’s biographic half of the book is that he’s produced both an intimate personal bio and a comprehensive professional bio as well. He’s talked to virtually everyone who Nelson inspired or mentored in rock criticism starting in the latter half of the sixties and into the Rolling Stone years. These knuckleheads are a who’s who of American rock criticism, God help us." – Joe Carducci (SST Records, Rock and the Pop Narcotic), The New Vulgate

Setting the Standard: Comics by Alex Toth 1952-1954

Review: "I was looking forward to this new book [Setting the Standard] a/ because it's Alex Toth and b/ because it reprints 60 stories, Toth's entire contribution to the catalogue of a long defunct publisher whose material we rarely see reprinted.... Toth's work has long been admired for its distilled simplicity of black and white design, but these early pages fizz and bubble with life.... The book under discussion is from Fantagraphics, with the original printed pages restored in all their colours by Greg Sadowski, who put the whole package together with extensive notes..." – Eddie Campbell (via The Comics Reporter)

Plugs: Brian Ralph's choices for his guest contribution to Robot 6's weekly "What Are You Reading?" column include Captain Easy Vol. 2 by Roy Crane ("It’s a fun combination of action and laughs. Sometimes very serious and other times very cartoony, in both story and art style. I just love the way Roy Crane draws these goons. And the colors! The palettes are unusual and beautiful.") and Setting the Standard: Comics by Alex Toth 1952-1954 ("I’ll read one of these [stories] before I go to bed. I like that in a short page count he quickly develops a rich story and twilight zoney twist. Sometimes it’s a bizarre romance or horror story with a stunning conclusion. They’re a fun read.")

Isle of 100,000 Graves

Review: "Brief but witty dialogue and black humor come together in a brutal satire of deception, torture and the death penalty. This comic is a good comedy that combines the sense of adventure and intrigue of Jason's comics, his 'tempo' and narrative tone, with a trio of protagonists who I came to appreciate in very few pages. Emotion, gags, surprises, and an ending that you do not expect. Isle of 100,000 Graves is an original and very enjoyable read that keeps Jason as a safe bet in the shopping cart. Between tenderness and cruelty, of course the contribution of writer Fabien Vehlmann to the Norwegian cartoonist's particular universe could not have been more successful." – Alita News (translated from Spanish)

Love and Rockets: New Stories #4

Review: "Warm-hearted, deceptively heart-wrenching, challenging, charming and irresistibly addictive, Love and Rockets: New Stories is a grown up comics fan’s dream come true and remains as valid and groundbreaking as its earlier incarnations — the diamond point of the cutting edge of American graphic narrative." – Win Wiacek, Now Read This!

Reviews (Video): Hosts Patrick Markfort and Dave Ferraro discuss Love and Rockets: New Stories #4 by the Hernandez Brothers and Gilbert's Love from the Shadows on the latest Comics-and-More podcast (4-part video at the link)

Discussion (Audio): Hosts Tim Young and Kumar Sivasubramanian, along with special guest Tom Spurgeon, discuss the Love and Rockets work of Jaime Hernandez on the latest episode of the Deconstructing Comics Podcast

Fantagraphics booth - TCAF 2011

Interview: The Comics Reporter 's Tom Spurgeon talks to backbone Mome contributor T. Edward Bak about his experience at Boomfest in St. Petersburg, Russia: "There were so many things going on. There were people interested in all of the presentations. They took place over four or five hours, in three or four different centers. A lot of artists were there. For these kinds of presentations, it was other artists attending. It was like APE: you have people that are making comics or are interested in making comics."

Jimbo's Inferno

Interview: At The Comics Journal, Matt Seneca enjoys a studio visit and thoughtful discussion with Gary Panter: "That’s one of the games that modern art plays: where does it go, and what does it affect by trying to go? And so, usually in fine art, you’re making a kind of pregnant or puzzling object, or some object that has presence and which calls to people, hopefully. It arrests them for a second and various things happen, whereas in a comic, I want people lying in bed reading it. I want people lying in bed and reading it, and you forget you’re reading it, and you go in the story, and you’re like, 'Whoa! What happened?' And you either remember it or you don’t."

The Comics Journal #300

Interview (Translated): The Frog 2000 blog translates the Howard Chaykin/Ho Che Anderson conversation from The Comics Journal #300 into Spanish (1st of 3 parts)

A Drunken  Dream and Other Stories [Pre-Order]

Publishing/Crime: Anime News Network has news of new work from Moto Hagio and reports on warnings of forged Hagio artwork in the marketplace

Daily OCD: 10/17/11
Written by Mike Baehr | Filed under Walt KellyreviewsMomeMickey MouseLove and RocketsLos Bros HernandezJim WoodringJasonJaime HernandezGilbert HernandezFloyd GottfredsonDrew FriedmanDisneyDash ShawDaily OCD 17 Oct 2011 10:47 PM

Today's Online Commentary & Diversions:

Love and Rockets: New Stories #4

Review: "Every now and then, if I’m lucky, I might just bump into a stone cold masterpiece. The kind of art that makes you just want to shout and scream it is so good. So, in the interest of doing just that, let me say that this Jaime Hernandez’s 'The Love Bunglers' (Love and Rockets: New Stories no. 4) is such a work. I don’t even need to qualify it for myself (i.e. 'what’s coming later; what’s come before; shouldn’t there be a cooling period?') when I say: This is not just Jaime’s finest work, but one of the best (at this moment I’d rank it in my top five of all time) works ever created in the medium. You can hold that over me in twenty years and I’ll still be right..." – Dan Nadel, The Comics Journal [SPOILER WARNING]

Review: "Jaime Hernandez is my favorite cartoonist. I think he is the greatest cartoonist of all time. My opinion.... No art moves me the way the work of Jaime Hernandez moves me. I am in awe of his eternal mystery." – Frank Santoro, The Comics Journal

Review: "I picked up a copy of the new issue at a signing Jaime was doing here in Brooklyn a few weeks ago. It was a packed house, and there were a lot of people I was happy to talk to. Amidst all the socializing, I allowed myself a quick glimpse inside the comic, and when I randomly flipped to pages 92 and 93, I felt like I’d been blind-sided. I had to look closer to make sure I was seeing what I thought I was seeing." – Adrian Tomine, The Comics Journal

Commentary: Robot 6's Sean T. Collins spotlights the above TCJ links, saying "Paying off thirty years of continuity and character development. Delivering shocks, gasps, cheers, and tears in equal measure, seemingly at the author’s whim. Offering a master class in everything from laying out a double-page spread to drawing clothes. Telling a story about beloved characters so emotionally engaging that even their most ardent fans wouldn’t mind if this were the last one ever told. Any way you slice it, Jaime Hernandez's 'The Love Bunglers' — his contribution to the recently released Love and Rockets: New Stories #4 and the conclusion to the already wildly acclaimed 'The Love Bunglers'/'Browntown' suite from last year’s issue — is a hell of a comic. But you don’t have to take my word for it."

Review: "As I finished reading Love and Rockets: New Stories #4, I had to sit back and just take a moment to take it all in and collect myself, as I know that I had just completed reading one of the greatest works in comics for 2011. Love and Rockets has been a source of inspiration within the comics industry for years, so it’s not like I’m the first one to praise the Brothers Hernandez for their contribution. But it’s even more incredible to see that after nearly 30 years, both Jaime and Gilbert Hernandez are creating some of the best comics of their careers and making them completely accessible to new readers. Love and Rockets: New Stories #4 is an achievement for the Brothers Hernandez and has earned a permanent spot on my required reading list for anyone interested in reading the great works of modern comics creators." – Ron Richards, iFanboy "Book of the Month"

Links: Another comprehensive round of Hernandez Bros.-related links from Love & Maggie

Pogo - Vol. 1 of the Complete Syndicated Comic Strips: Through the Wild Blue Wonder

Review (Audio): "The artwork [in Pogo] is fantastic because Kelly, coming from a Disney background, had really great technical chops and he was able to put a lot of detail into a small daily strip while at the same time giving it breathing room despite the fact that the characters are quite talkative…. He crowded an awful lot into each panel without making it feel crowded, which is a neat trick. He really pulled it off well. …It's just a joy to look at, and it's so much fun to read too because the characters all have really funny personalities that are… very dimensional… It is beautifully designed by Walt Kelly's daughter Carolyn Kelly, and she and Fantagraphics did a really good job of finding all these strips… lovingly scanned and restored so that you get to see the line art in all its detailed glory…. I highly recommend it -- it's going to be one of my prize books... that I'm going to hang onto for a long time." – Mark Frauenfelder, Boing Boing "Gweek" podcast  

Walt Disney's Mickey Mouse Vol. 1: Race to Death Valley

Review: "When you read the first volume of Fantagraphics' complete reprint of Gottfredson's Mickey Mouse — the first of its kind anywhere — you understand quickly why Disney decided to keep him on the daily strip. He was simply a natural talent." – Matthias Wivel, Nummer 9 (translated from Danish)

Isle of 100,000 Graves

Review (Audio): The hosts of The Comic Cast podcast look at Isle of 100,000 Graves by Jason & Fabien Vehlmann

Mome Vol. 22

Commentary: At The Panelists, Charles Hatfield's examination of "'Independent Comics' in the 21st Century" includes discussion of Love and Rockets: New Stories, Dash Shaw's Bottomless Belly Button, and Mome

Congress of the Animals

Commentary: "...Jim Woodring is not one to rest on his laurels where his funny-animal protagonist Frank is concerned. Lately he’s been posting breathtaking images... to his blog on a surprisingly regular basis. They appear to show Frank up to his old mischievous tricks, and to augur another Frank book on the horizon. Check them out here and here, and marvel that a cartoonist of Woodring’s caliber is tossing these things out there for free like it ain’t no thing." – Sean T. Collins, Robot 6

Even More Old Jewish Comedians

Flicks: For your Halloween rental-queue pleasure Drew Friedman picks his top 10 horror movies at TCM's Movie Morlocks blog (via TCJ)

Things to See: 10/3/11 Roundup
Written by Mike Baehr | Filed under Victor KerlowTim LaneTim KreiderThings to seeSteven WeissmanSteve BrodnerStephen DeStefanoSergio PonchioneRichard SalaRenee FrenchRay FenwickPaul KarasikPaul HornschemeierNoah Van SciverNick DrnasoMichael KuppermanMaxLilli CarréLewis TrondheimKevin HuizengaJordan CraneJohnny RyanJim WoodringJim FloraJasonFrank SantoroFantagraphics Bookstorefan artEleanor DavisDave CooperChuck ForsmanBob Fingerman 4 Oct 2011 2:37 AM

Frank caught in the loving tendrils of the sun by Jim Woodring

• Frank "caught in the loving tendrils of the sun" by Jim Woodring; also "Hopelessly outclassed" and "The descent into wealth"

Grotesque - Sergio Ponchione

A Grotesque "family portrait" and Mr. O'Blique postcards that Sergio Ponchione will be giving away to lucky attendees (I think? the autotranslation's a little iffy) at an upcoming festival in Italy

Totem - Jason/Lewis Trondheim

• Ooh, a Jason/Lewis Trondheim exquisite-corpse wraparound cover for a 2004 issue of Belgian comics fanzine Totem; this and film review potpourri at Jason's Cats Without Dogs blog

From Forlorn Funnies no. 1, Huge Suit and The Sea - Paul Hornschemeier

• Sketches and process peeks at Forlorn Funnies #1 at Paul Hornschemeier's The Daily Forlorn

Focus - Kevin Huizenga

Focus book by Kevin Huizenga

http://www.fantagraphics.com/images/flog/mike/201110/art-pope-nyr.jpg

Steve Brodner's portrait of Art Pope for The New Yorker (with process sketches); plus sketches of Lamar Alexander and Chris Christie; all of the above with Steve's commentary

Paul Karasik New Yorker cartoon

• Speaking of The New Yorker, Paul Karasik got a cartoon in there! Congrats Paul! (via Facebook)

Mega-Nerd - Stephen DeStefano

• A whole buncha Stephen DeStefano animation artwork for various projects here, here, here, here, here, here, and here, plus Sea Hag

page from Blammo - Noah Van Sciver

Noah Van Sciver presents a spooky story from the latest issue of Blammo

Richard Sala

Movie night Richard Sala-style (year unknown); also some cozy reading and The 7 Deadly Sins

Tim Lane - St. Louis International Film Festival poster

Tim Lane's poster for the St. Louis International Film Festival (along with its conceptual inspiration)

Great Pumpkin Festival

Steven Weissman and Jordan Crane are putting together an elementary school haunted house for some LUCKY KIDS and here's Steven's flyer for it with Jordan's logo for the school (from Steven via email); also from Steven, his latest "I, Anonymous" spot and Stincker sketchin'

Dave Cooper gig poster

• A fun Dave Cooper gig poster for his friend's band (via Facebook)

http://www.fantagraphics.com/images/flog/mike/201109/forsman-downbylaw.jpg

This comic cover by Chuck Forsman is a fake, but I wish it wasn't

http://www.fantagraphics.com/images/flog/mike/201110/star-trek-retardedness.jpg

A buncha silly Star Trek doodles by Tim Kreider

Ernest

Jim Varney smiles down from heaven on Johnny Ryan

Prison Pit fan art by Sergio Zuniga

Prison Pit fan art by Sergio Zuniga (at Johnny Ryan's blog, along with one previously posted here)

http://www.fantagraphics.com/images/flog/mike/201109/cf-fleury.jpg

Prison Pit fan art by Fréderic Fleury via Twitter

Twain in the Membrane - Dyna Moe

• Mark Twain-via-Michael Kupperman fan art by Dyna Moe (via Facebook, where the artist's profile pic was taken in front of Fantagraphics Bookstore & Gallery)

comic panel by Csaba Mester

• Speaking of Fantagraphics Bookstore and Facebook, here's a panel from a comic in progress by Csaba Mester featuring the former location posted at the latter location

Plus:

• Another Bob Fingerman character design

• Speaking of Facebook yet again, a Victor Kerlow illustration on the subject

Jupiter and Saturn by Frank Santoro

• Many recent illustrations by Max at his El Hombre Duerme, el Fantasma No blog

Recently discovered previously unseen woodblock prints circa 1939 by Jim Flora

Lilli Carré's new looping animated logo for the Eyeworks animation fest is pretty great (tee hee, the "W" is boobs)

A portrait by Nick Drnaso

• A whole ton of stuff from Ray Fenwick's website popped up in my RSS reader and I'm not sure how much of it is new but why not go check it all out anyway

Straw dog on a bed by Renee French

Computer sketches (that is, sketches done on the computer) by Eleanor Davis

Trubble Club is always fun even if we can't tell who drew what

Things to See: 9/26/11 Roundup
Written by Mike Baehr | Filed under Things to seeTaking Punk to the MassesSteven WeissmanSteve BrodnerStephen DeStefanoRon Regé JrRenee FrenchPaul HornschemeierNoah Van SciverMaxLorenzo MattottiLilli CarréKevin HuizengaJohnny RyanJim WoodringJim FloraJim BlanchardJasonFrank Santorofan artEleanor DavisAnders Nilsen 27 Sep 2011 2:36 AM

lettering - Jason

Lettering by Jason for Athos in America; other recent Cats Without Dogs blog posts include Woody Allen movie reviews and an R.E.M. top 5

http://www.fantagraphics.com/images/flog/mike/201109/littleguy.jpg

• From Kevin Huizenga, a couple of images from an upcoming anthology contribution (the originals of which are part of the Dylan Williams benefit auctions)

Frank in the Museum of Sex - Jim Woodring

Frank in the Museum of Sex, a recently-completed painting by Jim Woodring; also, Frank and the Living Rock, a drawing; Icebreaker, a drawing; and Frank in an unusual place, a photo

Aqualad - Steven Weissman

• Aqualad action by Steven Weissman at Repaneled; also his weekly "I, Anonymous " spot

Taking Punk to the Masses poster design - Jim Blanchard

• Unused (amazingly) poster design by Jim Blanchard for EMP's Nirvana: Taking Punk to the Masses exhibit

Cartoon Utopia - Ron Regé Jr.

Cartoon Utopia drawings by Ron Regé Jr. (still raising cash to aid in the completion of the book)

robot - Eleanor Davis

Eleanor Davis robot portraits and trial sketches for the GR2 Robots art show; also a band sketch and custom book cover

Epistemics - Paul Hornschemeier

Paul Hornschemeier continues posting Forlorn Funnies prep artwork and other drawings on his The Daily Forlorn blog

storyboard - Stephen DeStefano

Stephen DeStefano gets Trekky in this recent storyboard work

Lorenzo Mattotti - The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn

• Versions of Lorenzo Mattotti's cover illustration for The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn in various states and media

Caliban - Max

Caliban from Shakespeare's The Tempest and more by Max

http://www.fantagraphics.com/images/flog/mike/201109/johnny-ryan.jpg

Prison Pit fan art by Jon Light

Plus:

Updates on Frank Santoro's Tumblr including new drawings

New updates on the Jim Flora blog with vintage spot illustrations

Glow-in-the-dark prints by Lilli Carré

• A Noah Van Sciver "Chicken Strips" story from 2007

• One of Renee French's patented cute-n-creepy guys

Steve Brodner redesigns the symbol of justice in light of the Troy Davis execution

More travel sketches by Anders Nilsen

More YALSA 2012 Great Graphic Novels for Teens Nominations revealed
Written by Mike Baehr | Filed under Wilfred SantiagoPeter BaggeJasonGilbert Hernandezawards21 20 Sep 2011 1:31 AM

The list of nominees continues to grow for American Library Association/Young Adult Library Services Association "2012 Great Graphic Novels for Teens" list. Joining the already-announced Wandering Son Vol. 1 among the nominees are:

21: The Story of Roberto Clemente by Wilfred Santiago

21: The Story of Roberto Clemente by Wilfred Santiago

Yeah! by Peter Bagge & Gilbert Hernandez

Yeah! by Peter Bagge & Gilbert Hernandez

Isle of 100,000 Graves by Jason & Fabien Vehlmann

Isle of 100,000 Graves by Jason & Fabien Vehlmann

Nominees will continue to accumulate throughout the year, and will be winnowed down to the final list to be announced by the ALA in January.

Jason postage stamp!
Written by Mike Baehr | Filed under Jason 15 Sep 2011 4:18 PM

Jason postage stamp

Jason has been honored in his native Norway with his own postage stamp! It's one of a series of 4 featuring artwork by contemporary Norwegian cartoonists in commemoration of the 100th anniversary of the first comic to be published in Norway, as Jason explains on his blog. If we can just get the USPS to follow suit with some Love and Rockets or Eightball stamps, it might save them from bankruptcy!

Things to See: more of Jason's Athos in America sketches & notes
Written by Mike Baehr | Filed under Things to seeJasonComing Attractions 12 Sep 2011 11:11 PM

http://www.fantagraphics.com/images/flog/mike/201109/brainwoolf.jpg

As we pointed out a week or 2 ago, Jason has been posting some rough sketches and handwritten dialogue, along with brief comments on background and storytelling technique, for each of the stories in his upcoming book Athos in America on his Cats Without Dogs blog. Here's the complete set: "So Long, Mary Ann," "The Brain That Wouldn't Virginia Woolf," "Tom Waits on the Moon," "A Cat from Heaven," "The Smiling Horse" and the title story "Athos in America."