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Category >> Jim Woodring

Lunchtime at the Donner Diner
Written by Mike Baehr | Filed under Jim WoodringJim BlanchardJames Sturm 29 Oct 2010 4:36 PM

http://www.fantagraphics.com/images/flog/mike/201010/donner-diner-web1.jpg

In the spirit of Halloween, Jim Blanchard presents a newly-reworked version of "Donner Diner" featuring his inks over 1993 pencils by James Sturm, R. Sikoryak, Jason Lutes and Jim Woodring. Yum!

Jim Woodring's giant pen prototype progress
Written by Mike Baehr | Filed under Jim Woodring 19 Oct 2010 4:46 PM

Jim Woodring

Jim Woodring giant nib prototype

Jim Woodring is tracking the progress of his giant nib pen project at the United States Artists Project Site; in this post, follow along as he develops the working prototype.

Daily OCD: 10/5/10
Written by Mike Baehr | Filed under Tim HensleyreviewsPeanutsNate NealMaurice TillieuxLove and RocketsLos Bros HernandezJim WoodringJaime HernandezJacques TardiGilbert HernandezFour Color FearDrew FriedmanDaily OCDComing AttractionsCarol Tyler 5 Oct 2010 7:37 PM

Online Commentary & Diversions, back from a short vacation:

You'll Never Know Book 2: Collateral Damage [Pre-Order]

Review: "In the first volume of Tyler's planned trilogy of graphic memoirs [You'll Never Know], she dug into the eruptive, violent memories of her father's WWII experiences while simultaneously dealing with a husband who decided to go find himself and leave her with a daughter to raise. This second volume is no less rich and overwhelming. [...] While the language of Chicago-raised and Cincinnati-based Tyler has a winningly self-deprecating Midwestern spareness to it, her art is a lavishly prepared kaleidoscope of watercolors and finely etched drawings, all composed to look like the greatest family photo album of all time. The story's honest self-revelations and humane evocations of family dramas are tremendously moving." – Publishers Weekly (Starred Review)

Too Soon? Famous/Infamous Faces 1995-2010 [Pre-Order]

Review: "Friedman's hyper-realistic pen-and-ink and water-color portraits of show business and political luminaries have made their way into the likes of Entertainment Weekly, The New Yorker and Rolling Stone over the years, and a stunning new collection has just been published by Fantagraphics Books — Too Soon?: Famous/Infamous Faces 1995-2010. [...] To say that Friedman's drawings are unsentimental or unsparing is just to scratch the surface. Known for depicting every last liver spot, burst capillary and wrinkle, his work is truly a Warts and All procedure. [...] You might say the super-realistic portraits are loving ones, but only in the sense that you love your own family members, whose soft spots and selfishness one is forced to forgive. Drew Friedman's heart is as big as his capacious eye for the telling detail. Seek him out or forever hold your peace." – David Weiss, Life Goes Strong

Four Color Fear: Forgotten Horror Comics of the 1950s [Pre-Order]

Review: "...Four Color Fear offers some of the finest pre-code comic book horror tales ever produced. Extensively researched, complete with story notes, editor Sadowski compiled a superior collection of non-EC tales, many of which rarely reprinted in color. A 30-page cover art section and a fascinating article by historian John Benson, who also supplied the book's intro, about the little remembered, but prolific Ruth Roche, round out this sensational historical tour of the Golden Age of Horror Comics. Highly recommended!" – Rick Klaw, The SF Site: Nexus Graphica

Love and Rockets: New Stories #3 [with FREE Signed Bookplate]

Review: "The wait [for Love and Rockets: New Stories #3] has been long, no doubt, but I dare say that it was not only worthwhile, but it has proved an inspiration to continue to have faith in mankind, because with artists like these, it is worth living. For the third annual issue..., Beto gets really wild and Xaime creates a stunning tapestry of memories and narrative levels." – Mauricio Matamoros, Iconoctlán (translated from Spanish)

Interview: As part of his ongoing "Love and Rocktoberfest," Sean T. Collins posts his 2007 Wizard interview with Gilbert & Jaime Hernandez at Attentiondeficitdisorderly: "I liked drawing rockets and robots, as well as girls. [Laughs] It really was no big game plan. It was almost like, 'Okay, I'll give you rockets and robots, but I'll show you how it's done. I'm gonna do it, and this is how it's supposed to be done!' I went in with that kind of attitude." (Jaime)

Love and Rockets Book 25: High Soft Lisp [with FREE Signed Bookplate]

Review: "Like much of Hernandez’s work, there’s light amongst all this darkness, particularly later in this section of Fritz’s story. But [High Soft Lisp] remains a bleak book, with Fritz’s own cheerful optimism one of the few beacons of hope amongst a cast of incidental characters whose main purpose seems only to exploit her. Hernandez rarely performs below his best and this is no exception..." – Andy Shaw, Grovel

Wally Gropius

Review: "Vast swaths of Wally Gropius appear — at least to my eye — to be visual homages to images that Hensley particularly loves. (The alternative is that he lays his panels out in his static, staccato rhythm just for that feeling, which is close to the same impulse.) It's all very loud and manic and bright and bizarre, veering towards and away from coherence often within the same panel. [...] The end result has that go-go energy and restless heat of the authentic products of the era Hensley sets his story in..." – Andrew Wheeler, The Antick Musings of G.B.H. Hornswoggler, Gent.

The Complete Peanuts 1977-1978 (Vol. 14) [NORTH AMERICA ONLY]

Review: "...[T]his Complete Peanuts series might be the ultimate thing for Peanuts fans! [...] I think the book [Vol. 14] is just wonderful, and I give it and all of the volumes my highest recommendation!" – Catgirl Critics' Media Mewsings

Weathercraft

Interview: Illustration Friday talks to Jim Woodring: "Names and labels don’t matter much. Besides, there are things that cannot be said in words. So if you say them in pictures, are they not things being said? If I draw a hill that looks like a woman, it works differently that if i write 'there’s a hill that looks like a woman.' Also there are clues that one doesn’t want discovered too quickly, or not at all. Because one wants the emanations to proceed from an unknown source."

The Sanctuary

Plug: "Nate Neal's first graphic novel [The Sanctuary] is dumbfoundingly ambitious: it takes as its subject nothing less than the invention of comics, in the sense of narrative-in-pictures, meaning that its cast is a bunch of cave-people. Cave-people who speak a cave-person language that Neal has invented himself (he offers the translation of a few key words on its jacket copy, but that's it). The working title of the book was a drawing of a bison. A man's reach should exceed his grasp, or what's a heaven for?" – Douglas Wolk, Comics Alliance

http://www.fantagraphics.com/images/flog/mike/201010/arctic.jpg

Coming Attractions: Bleeding Cool's Rich Johnston did a little Amazon digging and noticed that we're publishing Gil Jourdan by Maurice Tillieux and Jacques Tardi’s Le Démon Des Glaces (The Arctic Marauder) next year

Daily OCD: 10/1/10
Written by Mike Baehr | Filed under Zippy the PinheadreviewsLove and RocketsJim WoodringJaime HernandezDaily OCDBill Griffith 1 Oct 2010 6:08 PM

Today's Online Commentary & Diversions:

Zippy: Ding Dong Daddy from Dingburg [Pre-Order]

Review: "The latest collection of Bill Griffith’s newspaper strip Zippy the Pinhead, Ding Dong Daddy from Dingburg is also my first exposure to the long-running underground. [...] Zippy is unlike any comic strip, or comic book for that matter, I’ve thus encountered. [...] Mixed into a steady stream of seemingly random silliness,... readers also uncover a singular worldview, a commentary on politics, religion, the stumbling newspaper industry and its technological replacements, and seemingly Griffith’s favorite windmill, pop culture. ...Griffith [is] a sublimely witty observer." – Michael C. Lorah, Newsarama

Locas: The Maggie and Hopey Stories [with FREE Signed Bookplate]

Review: "I happy to announce the start of LOVE AND ROCKTOBER here at Attentiondeficitdisorderly. For the next month, I'll be devoting my regularly scheduled Comics Time reviews to as much of Los Bros Hernandez' work as I can get through, starting with the Jaime material I misguidedly maligned. I believe that Love and Rockets is all but unique in comics in the way it has taken advantage of serialization to slowly create a rich and enveloping world peopled with multifaceted characters who seem to be living lives on and off the page. And it did this twice, simultaneously! [...] First, let's start by revisiting sins past: My Comics Journal review of Locas, which I'd avoided re-posting here on the blog for years, waiting for precisely this sort of opportunity to serve as a corrective." – Sean T. Collins, Attentiondeficitdisorderly

Weathercraft

Review: "Weathercraft... is a nice showcase for Woodring's beautiful art, which often dips into the grotesque, but is always interesting and somehow pretty no matter what is depicted.  He's a great cartoonist, which he shows off through his imaginative creatures and the curious monsters, and fully-realized alien world.  It's a whimsical journey, completely silent, but unforgettable and haunting." – Dave Ferraro, Comics-and-More

Things to see: 9/29/10
Written by Mike Baehr | Filed under Wilfred SantiagoTony MillionaireThings to seeSteven WeissmanSteve BrodnerRoger LangridgeRichard SalaRenee FrenchRay FenwickPeanutsNoah Van SciverMarco CoronaMaakiesLaura ParkKevin HuizengaJordan CraneJoe KimballJim WoodringJim FloraJasonHans RickheitGabrielle BellDrew WeingDerek Van GiesonDebbie DrechslerDave CooperDash ShawDaniel ClowesAndrice ArpAnders Nilsen 28 Sep 2010 11:48 PM

Periodic clips & strips — click for improved/additional viewing and possible artist commentary at the sources:

Ibsen cover - Jason

Jason presents two cover illustrations: one for a biography of Henrik Ibsen, the other for a 1989 issue of a Norwegian fanzine (oh yeah, and the cover for his next Fanta collection What I Did is in there too)

I, Anonymous - Steven Weissman

Steven Weissman's latest "I, Anonymous" spot and some sketchbook pages here and here

Snoopy - Valerie Fletcher

Eightball 2 - Anthony Vukojevich

• A couple of witty recent entries on the Covered blog: Valerie Fletcher's version of The Complete Peanuts 1969-1970 and Anthony Vukojevich's take on Eightball #2

Dave Cooper

Dave Cooper gives a peek at a few of the 96 little drawings he's bringing on his West Coast book tour, with commentary

gut check - Jim Woodring

• An unpleasant new Jim Woodring panel

Jordan Crane

• The final part of Jordan Crane's "Chapter Two: Unraveling" at What Things Do

Dungeon - Drew Weing

• A bit of Dungeon fan art by Drew Weing 

"Greetings, stranger of the future. If you are reading this, it means the written word has survived, that the world of tomorrow still exists, and that for some reason my ramblings are still considered worth reading. My name is Mark Twain, and I write these words to you in the good old days of August 2010."

• A prose story from Michael Kupperman: "From the Newly Discovered Second Autobiography of Mark Twain"

Invisible Hands - Richard Sala

Richard Sala presents a whole bunch of production, concept, and storyboard art from his animated serial "Invisible Hands" from MTV's Liquid Television, in 4 installments (so far) here here here and here, with commentary

http://www.fantagraphics.com/images/flog/mike/201009/benemerenze%20di%20satana%2002%20150dpi.jpg

• "Benemerenze di satana" by Marco Corona 

Jim Flora

• A woodcut illustration of Cincinnati (1941), an uncompleted sketchbook drawing (circa 1950) and a magazine proposal sketch (1956), all at the Jim Flora blog (with commentary from Irwin Chusid)

black phoebe - Debbie Drechsler

• A black phoebe and some ground squirrels from Debbie Drechsler's nature sketchbook, with commentary

San Diego - Gabrielle Bell

• It's part 8 of Gabrielle Bell's "San Diego Comic-Con Comicumentary"

Elijah Lovejoy November 7 1837 - Noah Van Sciver

Noah Van Sciver's historical strip "Elijah Lovejoy November 7 1837" part 1 and part 2

Let's Do Piriformis Stretches!

Laura Park gets anatomical with a how-to and a note to her doctor

rodents - Renee French

• From Renee French: hairy girl, fly with stick, dog, Ikea roof, guys (photo), baby, rodents, thing roofs

Daily Drawing 20 - Dash Shaw

Dash Shaw's Daily Drawing nos. 15, 16, 17, 18, 19 & 20

Truman vs. Obama - Steve Brodner

• Recent Steve Brodner sketches, with commentary, of Dinesh d'Souza, cowardly Karl Rove, the corpse of Harry Truman giving Obama what-for, and Truman's bones revisited

creepy cave - Kevin Huizenga

• It looks like Kevin Huizenga is sending Glenn Ganges on some kind of Hardy Boys adventure or something

Ackroyd - Roger Langridge

• I didn't know that Roger Langridge had done rejected cover comps for our Jules Feiffer novel reprints (one of which got canceled anyway)

sketchbook - Anders Nilsen

• New sketchbook pages from Anders Nilsen 

http://www.fantagraphics.com/images/flog/mike/201009/page43.jpg

Hans Rickheit's Ectopiary page 43; Hans also has a song for you

Enough Astronaut Blood to Last the Winter - cover - Derek Van Gieson

The cover to Derek Van Gieson's evocatively titled upcoming publication

Cluster of Tigers

• Tigers clustered and solo by Andrice Arp for an old Giant Robot art show

Process

• From Wilfred Santiago, page 91 of 21, plus process images for pages 120 & 121, and a postcard illustration

Maakies - Tony Millionaire

Two weeks worth of Tony Millionaire's Maakies

Work in progress (presumably) by Joe Kimball

Spots for Cottage Life Magazine

Recent spot illos by Ray Fenwick for Cottage Life Magazine

Jim Woodring's Genius Award acceptance
Written by Mike Baehr | Filed under Jim Woodring 26 Sep 2010 9:16 PM

Jim Woodring at The Stranger Genius Awards, Sept. 17, 2010

We had the honor of witnessing Jim Woodring accepting his Stranger Genius Award for Literature at the majestic Moore Theatre in Seattle on the evening of Friday, September 17. Prior to the speeches cupcakes printed with edible portraits of the winners (or representations of their work) were available (and delicious). I assumed that the ceremony was bing filmed, or else I would have taken video instead of photos, but unfortunately no footage has yet surfaced. Luckily, Jim has posted the text of his acceptance speech, which was a humdinger. Click here for more photos.

Jim Woodring at The Stranger Genius Awards, Sept. 17, 2010

Jim Woodring at The Stranger Genius Awards, Sept. 17, 2010

Daily OCD: 9/24/10
Written by Mike Baehr | Filed under Steven BrowerStephen DeStefanoreviewsRand HolmesPatrick RosenkranzMoto HagioMort MeskinmangaLove and RocketsLos Bros HernandezKim DeitchJim WoodringJaime HernandezGilbert HernandezFour Color FearDrew WeingDrew FriedmanDaily OCDComing AttractionsCatalog No 439Al Jaffee 24 Sep 2010 6:32 PM

Today's Online Commentary & Diversions:

Set to Sea

Review: "We are witness to a man's life unfolding, unraveling, before us in a series of postcards that leave nothing — or is it everything? — to the imagination. I don't know Drew Weing, or whether he's lucky or good, but in Set to Sea , he has reminded me once again just how much story you can share in a brief flurry of comic panels, so long as you know how to trim the sails and catch the wind." – Steve Duin, The Oregonian

Review: "...Set to Sea... is so much more than a hauntingly inspiring story about a poet who ends up on a sea vessel. It is so much more than page after page of highly-detailed illustrations. It feels like a small precious art book full of engravings or paintings on each page or an old illustrated maritime novel. [...] Weing’s art is mesmerizing. You could stare at one page for hours. Each page is carefully planned and crafted to maximize its storytelling ability and it is easy to see the love and effort that went into each line and crosshatch." – Shawn Daughhetee, The HeroesOnline Blog

Review: "The pages [of Set to Sea] are incredibly expressive, able to convey longing, panic, rage, camaraderie, mourning, and ultimately peace. Weing manipulates whole compositions to achieve these effects, not merely the expressions on characters’ faces." – Joshua Malbin

Review: "Drew [Weing] uses the possibilities of the medium to perfection [in Set to Sea], telling the life story of the guy page by page, somehow pulling the impression of a richly lived life through scattered moments." – Kevin Bramer, Optical Sloth

Lucky in Love Book 1: A Poor Man's History [with FREE Signed Bookplate]

Review: "Imagine Sad Sack stepping out of his cartoon world and into ours — warts and all — and that’s what Lucky in Love almost feels like. [...] The real star of the show here is artist DeStefano, who mixes up this 1940s world as one-part humor strip outrageousness, and one-part gorgeous Will Eisner-style dramatic noir — a real visual tour de force." – John Seven, Worcester Magazine

A Drunken  Dream and Other Stories [Pre-Order]

Review: "Revealed in these pages [of A Drunken Dream and Other Stories] are gentle but dark stories that are preoccupied with the loss and alienation that their intended audiences no doubt feel, often without any tangible reasons beyond the purely psychological. Several stories stand out for cherry pickers, but you’ll be rewarded by each entry." – John Mitchell, North Adams Transcript

Review: At The Hooded Utilitarian, Noah Berlatsky examines (and spoils) the first four stories in A Drunken Dream in his own inimitable fashion

The Artist Himself: A Rand Holmes Retrospective [Pre-Order]

Review: "...The Artist Himself... present[s] a compellingly fresh... approach to the history of the medium... What makes The Artist Himself unique is in the title itself — Rosenkranz has constructed a sprawling portrait of Rand Holmes as a man in conflict with the 'the artist himself' — a man trying to carve out a way to live that allowed for art (never an easy feat) and an art that somehow made sense in his life. ...[A]side from the obvious benefits of learning about Holmes, I found myself selfishly drawing tremendous inspiration from Rosenkranz as he demonstrated the richness possible in writing the history of comics. He draws the curtain back as if to say, 'see, here’s someone you hardly think of, who lived an extraordinary life, and it’s a life that must be reckoned within the history.' It radically broadens what we think of as a cartoonist’s life, and in that Rosenkranz has given us a great gift." – Dan Nadel, Comics Comics

Love and Rockets: New Stories #3 [with FREE Signed Bookplate]

Review: "If Love and Rockets: New Stories #3 only contained Gilbert Hernandez’s 36-page 'Scarlet By Starlight,' it would still be one of the most significant new comics of the year. [...Jaime's] 'The Love Bunglers' and 'Browntown' offer the kind of rich, intricate stories — packed with sharp observations about human desire and self-justification — that only an author with 30 years of experience with these characters could write. But readers don’t need to have read all the previous Maggie tales to follow them. Everything a newcomer needs to know is woven neatly into the stories themselves... There are acclaimed filmmakers and novelists who can’t do what Jaime Hernandez does — or Gilbert, for that matter. When the two of them are at their most inspired, as they are here, they make almost every other comics creator today look like a fumbling hack. [Grade] A" – The A.V. Club

Review: "I won't pretend to have a clue as to what Beto's trying to do with this stuff; sometimes he seems to be paying tribute of sorts to junk cinema and/or comment on the current state of the movies, and sometimes it seems like he just wants to draw to naked dudes beating a cop to death with a rock. ...Jaime is note-perfect throughout, using every nuance and trick at his command to engage and move the reader. It's a masterwork, and I'll be damned if I can tell what he'll do for an encore. ...[T]his one brings the goods. If you care at all about this series and those characters, you'll want to get this [issue of Love and Rockets: New Stories]..." – Johnny Bacardi, Popdose

Review: "...[T]his one is really damn good, with a typically surreal and horrifying story from Gilbert and an excellent bit of character work from Jaime. Isn't it awesome that stuff on this level is what we've come to expect? [...] Yes, it's another great issue of one of the best comics series of all time; what else is new? Jaime and Gilbert are rightfully revered as all-time great creators, but the fact that they are still pumping out incredible work and bettering themselves, sure to keep doing it for as long as possible, should make readers celebrate their wealth and fortune. Even if everybody else quit, we would still be pretty lucky. Long live Love and Rockets!" – Matthew J. Brady, Warren Peace Sings the Blues

Review: "You open a Xaime story, you know what you’re gonna get. He’s a known quantity/quality on the richest level... With Xaime, you’re going to get a perfectly-told Locas story: clean... and humanistic and relatable, funny, sad, the whole package. Beto, on the other hand …. His shit is scary creative, and sometimes just scary. Gilbert is the higher mathematics, you know what I’m saying? Ever since 'Human Diastrophism' I haven’t felt safe in his company, haven’t trusted that crazy bastard. Because he will do some fucked-up shit when you least expect it. [...] So, boom, right on Jump Street of Love and Rockets: New Stories #3 there’s a Gilbert story. Deep breath. Okay. In we go with gun and flashlight." – Rob Gonsalves, Rob's Comics Zone

Four Color Fear: Forgotten Horror Comics of the 1950s [Pre-Order]

Review: "The colors are garish, the stories grotesque, and the art much freakier than the norm. Where EC’s comics are more akin to the drive-in fodder of American International Pictures, the comics in Four Color Fear are the equivalent of a David F. Friedman grindhouse roughie: lurid, exploitative, and just plain wrong. In short, this book is awesome. Making it even more awesome is Sadowski’s annotation: ...the layer of scholarship is enough to make reading about decaying zombies and devil-worshippers seem almost ennobling. [Grade] A-" – The A.V. Club

Too Soon? Famous/Infamous Faces 1995-2010 [Pre-Order]

Review: "Caricature is a bit of a dying art, but there’s still a place for it, especially in a celebrity-obsessed culture like ours that goes out of its way to make its idols look even better than they already do. That’s why we need Drew Friedman, whose precise, pointillist style has been putting the rich and famous to the sword for decades. His new collection, Too Soon?: Famous/Infamous Faces 1995-2010, features another round of his inimitable caricatures, which manage to make everyone from venal creeps to well-meaning politicians look alternately hideous and noble. Friedman is still at the top of his game... [Grade] B+" – The A.V. Club

From Shadow to Light: The Life & Art of Mort Meskin [Pre-Order]

Review: "One of the lesser-known lights of the Golden Age, illustrator Mort Meskin was a prolific workhorse whose angular, action-packed style and use of deep shadow effects would prove a huge influence on Steve Ditko. From Shadow to Light: The Life and Art of Mort Meskin, a new biography of Meskin compiling exhaustive interviews with his peers and extensive cooperation from his sons, doesn’t lack for material. It also has plenty of great anecdotes, and through quality reproductions, it skillfully makes its case that its subject was a very talented artist. [Grade] B-" – The A.V. Club

Catalog No. 439: Burlesque  Paraphernalia and Side Degree Specialties and Costumes

Review: "The 1930 DeMoulin Bros. catalog, or Catalog No. 439: Burlesque Paraphernalia and Side Degree Specialties and Costumes, ...reached the jester of a more or less pronounced sadistic orientation, and offered them the tools and effects that made it possible to fool friends (?) to put their heart in their throat and give them pain here and there. Fantagraphics Books has recently reprinted the directory again (along with several essays that comment on product selection in a cultural perspective)... Although one might prefer to avoid being exposed to the tricks that comprise the DeMoulin catalog, I must admit that I laughed both three and five times when I looked through the offerings. Most of us probably have a little sadist in us, I guess." – Kjetil Johansen, Nekropolis – Den Historiske Bloggen (translated from Norwegian)

Weathercraft

Plugs: "Well, in our rambunctious endeavour to keep up with the literary radness of the Northwest, we... want to point you toward [Jim] Woodring’s newest graphic novel, Weathercraft, which is out now from Seattle-based publisher Fantagraphic Books. In addition to Weathercraft, we personally recommend their series Love and Rockets, from Los Bros Hernandez. If you’re looking for some reading that really is graphic, like super sexy female bodies comin at ya with homoerotic undertones that are never unleashed but still drive you crazy, you’ll want to pick up Love and Rockets. This series is an endlessly delicious ride through the relationships of men and women in crappy southern California neighborhoods." – Lori Huskey, Dark Sky Magazine

The Complete Peanuts 1977-1978 (Vol. 14) [NORTH AMERICA ONLY]

List: Graphic Novel Reporter's "Fall Graphic Novels List: Essential Reading for the Season" includes The Complete Peanuts 1977-1978 by Charles M. Schulz, A Drunken Dream and Other Stories by Moto Hagio, Unlovable: The Complete Collecton by Esther Pearl Watson, Fire & Water: Bill Everett, the Sub-Mariner and the Birth of Marvel Comics by Blake Bell, From Shadow to Light: The Life & Art of Mort Meskin by Steven Brower, You'll Never Know, Book Two: Collateral Damage by C. Tyler, Love and Rockets: New Stories 3 by the Hernandez Bros., Prison Pit: Book 2 by Johnny Ryan, The Sanctuary by Nate Neal, Zippy: Ding Dong Daddy from Dingburg by Bill Griffith, The Extraordinary Adventures of Adèle Blanc-Sec Vol. 1 by Jacques Tardi, Bent by Dave Cooper, Mome Vol. 20, Forlorn Funnies Vol. 1 by Paul Hornschemeier,  and Unexplored Worlds: The Steve Ditko Archives, Vol. 2

The Search for Smilin' Ed!

Profile: Robot 6 presents a "Comics College" introductory guide to the work of Kim Deitch, written by Deitch Universe expert Bill Kartalopoulos: "Kim Deitch is an enormously vital and prolific cartoonist who was also one of the charter members of the underground comix scene that changed comics in the 1960s and 70s. [...] More than forty years later, Deitch stands as one of the few underground cartoonists who has steadily and consistently produced a large body of important work, spanning every available format from the alternative weekly comic strip to the graphic novel."

Humbug

Interview: Al Jaffee touches briefly on his Humbug days in this extensive Q&A with Mother Jones's Michael Mechanic: "I loved Harvey [Kurtzman] and I miss him to this day. He was a very, very inspiring guy. He was inventive and inspiring and he also was just a scrupulous editor. He could catch things that most people would just say, 'Let it go through, it really doesn't matter; who's going to know?' But once Harvey pointed it out, I would change it even if it took me the whole day. Harvey knew how to make things work because he wasn't greedy, he wasn't successful." (Via ¡Journalista!)

Back in stock: Frank Vol. 1
Written by Mike Baehr | Filed under Jim Woodring 23 Sep 2010 12:58 PM
FRANK - Jim Woodring

We discovered an inventory SNAFU, so Frank Vol. 1 by Jim Woodring has been upgraded from "Sold Out" to "We Got Plenty"! This softcover volume contains Frank material currently not in print elsewhere (including 32 pages of full-color stories), so if you're a recent Frankophile and you don't have this stuff in your collection, now's your chance!

Jet City this Weekend
Written by Eric Reynolds | Filed under Peter BaggeJim Woodringevents 23 Sep 2010 11:27 AM

This Saturday is the first inaugural Jet City Comic Show here in our own backyard of Seattle, and we will be there. Come by and say hi to Larry Reid and Jacq Cohen, and in the afternoon, look for Peter Bagge and newly-crowned GENIUS Jim Woodring, who will be signing books for an hour or two. Stop by an pick up a coupon for 20% off at our bookstore and gallery!

Things to see: 9/21/10
Written by Mike Baehr | Filed under Zippy the PinheadTony MillionaireTim LaneThings to seeSteven WeissmanSteve BrodnerStephen DeStefanoSergio PonchioneRoy CraneRichard SalaRenee FrenchNoah Van ScivermerchMatthias LehmannMark KalesnikoMaakiesLilli CarréLaura ParkKim DeitchJosh SimmonsJordan CraneJim WoodringJim FloraJasonHans RickheitGabrielle BellFrank SantoroEleanor DavisDerek Van GiesonDebbie DrechslerDash ShawDame DarcyBill GriffithAnders Nilsen 21 Sep 2010 3:10 AM

A lot of catching up to do with this batch of clips & strips — click for improved/additional viewing and possible artist commentary at the sources:

Zippy Comix iPhone app draft

Ping Pongs - Bill Griffith

• A couple of things Bill Griffith has recently shared on Facebook: the rejected first draft of the home screen for the Zippy Comix iPhone app, and a "lost" Wacky Packages design that Bill says is "almost sacrilegious"

The Photo Finish! - Kim Deitch

Dr. Hermes Retro-Scans presents "The Photo-Finish!", a 4-page Kim Deitch story from Corn Fed, 1972 (via ¡Journalista!)

Roy Crane sketchbook

• At Potrzebie, Bhob Stewart presents Roy Crane's 1920s Mexico sketchbook (via ¡Journalista!)

Look at Me - Jim Woodring

Jim Woodring presents "Spectacularly unpleasant goings-on from CONGRESS OF THE ANIMALS, page 60"

'Mazing Man - Stephen DeStefano

• It's Stephen DeStefano's 'Mazing Man redux (and seemingly feminized)

Matthias Lehmann

• From Matthias Lehmann, one more work-in-progress photo and, above, the finished product 

bubblegum cards - Jason

• From Jason: promotional "bubblegum cards"; a catalog cover (one of ours? I don't have them handy to check); and a book cover illustration (with a different take on the dog-headed figure)

I, Anonymous - Steven Weissman

• From Steven Weissman: a new "I, Anonymous" spot; new stuff on sale at Comic Art Collective; the cutest damn sidewalk chalk drawing ever; "School Spirits" & "Series 3" Stinckers

Silver Surfer - Frank Santoro

• From Frank Santoro: more Silver Surfer art; something titled Pompe11; "Postcard from Pittsburgh Pennsylvania" for Internazionale, with translation

Wax Wolf t-shirt - Dame Darcy

• A new batch of crafts & merch from Dame Darcy in her latest blog update

tiny buckwheat - Eleanor Davis

19 new illustrations by Eleanor Davis for a local organic farm newsletter and a letterpress print in the new edition of the Cloudy Collection

sketchbook - Richard Sala

A handful of vintage Richard Sala sketchbook pages

Belligerent Piano - Tim Lane

The latest installment of Tim Lane's Belligerent Piano

Mambo for Fonts

flornaments

Now available, a licensed Jim Flora font complete with "Flornaments" dingbats

Nuttalls woodpecker - Debbie Drechsler

• From Debbie Drechsler's nature sketchbook: woodpeckers, turtles, fungi, squirrels

Chicago Reader Fall Arts Guide 2010 - Lilli Carré

• From Lilli Carré: the cover of the Chicago Reader's Fall Arts Guide; animated loop drawings in progress, completed and projected

San Diego Comic-Con Comicumentary - Gabrielle Bell

Gabrielle Bell presents part 7 of her "San Diego Comic-Con Comicumentary" and her strip from the San Francisco Panorama

Pacer - Mark Kalesniko

• More AMC Pacer studies for Freeway by Mark Kalesniko, including action/disaster shots

Kid Factor - Sergio Ponchione

• A Sergio Ponchione illustration for a radio talent show (I think)

I'm Back - Noah Van Sciver

A message from Noah Van Sciver, plus an announcement and other updates, and an excerpt from his Lincoln story at Top Shelf 2.0

time is dragging on

Laura Park documents a day in the life with chronic back pain

Rickles - Josh Simmons

• From Josh Simmons: Rickles, swaying Quackers

otto - Renee French

• From Renee French: Bugatti toy photo, sculpt of slug masked girl, e's, Barry with stick, tongue mask, mitt dude, slug girl sketch, shadowy creature, turds, Otto

daily drawing 13 - Dash Shaw

Dash Shaw's Daily Drawings no. 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, & 14

Christine O'Donnell - Steve Brodner

Steve Brodner's latest newsmaker portraits with commentary: Marty Peretz, John Boehner, Christine O'Donnell, Hamid Karzai, Cantor Yosele Rosenblatt, Sarah Palin & Rupert Murdoch

The Great Gatsby - cover by Anders Nilsen

Anders Nilsen's Great Gatsby cover for Penguin UK, with preliminary studies; a car engine; and a portrait of Richard Brautigan

Ectopiary page 42 - Hans Rickheit

Hans Rickheit's Ectopiary page 41 & 42, plus a poster for The Bad Seed

concert poster - Derek Van Gieson

• A concert poster from Derek Van Gieson's archives

Maakies - Tony Millionaire

The latest Maakies from Tony Millionaire 

Cinefamily - Deep Red - Jordan Crane

Jordan Crane's cover illustration for the latest Cinefamily newsletter