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Category >> Joost Swarte

If I Were in Brussels I'd Sure as Hell Go To This
Written by Kim Thompson | Filed under Joost Swarteeventsart shows 26 Aug 2011 3:29 PM
galerie champaka

Galerie Champaka

 

Eric Verhoest et Thomas Spitaels
ont le plaisir de vous inviter
à l’inauguration de
Trafic par

Joost Swarte

Vernissage en présence de l’artiste,
le jeudi 8 septembre 2011
de 18h00 à 20h30
_

Eric Verhoest en Thomas Spitaels
hebben het genoegen u uit te nodigen
op de opening van
Trafic door

Joost Swarte

Vernissage in het bijzijn van de kunstenaar
op donderdag 8 september 2011
van 18u00 tot 20u30

 


Galerie Champaka - Arts de Bande Dessinée

Rue Ernest Allardstraat, 27
Bruxelles 1000 Brussel
Belgium
Tel : +32 2 514 91 52 
Fax : +32 2 346 16 09
This e-mail address is being protected from spam bots, you need JavaScript enabled to view it
www.galeriechampaka.com


(Apologies to Tom Spurgeon for swiping his title.) That is one classy invitation, too.

I doubt the fact that the show's title is the same as the title of Jacques Tati's final movie is a coincidence; as I recall Tati's Playtime is Joost's favorite movie.

And yes, we're barreling down the final few laps of the Swarte Book Marathon! It's still on for early 2012.
















Adventures in translation, Part Deux
Written by Kim Thompson | Filed under Joost SwarteComing Attractions 27 Apr 2011 11:32 AM

Working my way through the Joost Swarte book, I stumbled across this panel (I'm showing the French version because the Dutch one I have only in black and white, and it needs to be shown in color for the full effect), in which a woman Joost's hero Jopo is trying to pick up leaves him a kiss-off message written in lipstick on a mirror. And I thought, uh-oh.

Jopo - French

This Swarte book is being printed in a "co-production," which means that two or more publishers simultaneously go to press on the same book in different languages. In order to achieve this, the publishers have to make sure that any alterations for translation purposes appear only in the BLACK layer (the covers are excepted from this) — so any text has to either be in a common language, or distractingly translated via a footnote. A red lipstick scrawl telling someone to fuck off (or in the case of the French version that he's a "testicle," which is kind of like calling someone a dick) in a foreign language is a definite reader-annoyance.

Which is why when I recently got Joost's final files for the book and checked out this panel, I actually laughed out loud. Can you guess how he handled it? Try. Then click here to see his megabrilliant solution.

Adventures in translation
Written by Kim Thompson | Filed under Joost SwarteComing Attractions 26 Apr 2011 8:31 AM

Between my own (ahem) vast accumulated knowledge and the marvels of the internet, it's rare that I find myself genuinely stumped by a line in a book I'm translating, but when I came across this particular panel in the Joost Swarte book Is That All There Is? that will (yes, it will!) be coming out later this year, I was mystified:

Joost Swarte panel - Dutch

Jopo de Pojo is trying to slip out of a movie theatre midshow, and while the latter two patrons' comments are are self-evident enough (an irate "hush!" and a complaint about Jopo's trademark quiff, mistaken for a hat), the first one baffled me, as it seemed to say "would you let out the goat?" or perhaps "are you going to let out the goat?"

As it happens, there exists an English language version of this story created by the Dutch publisher, which Joost himself once referred to as a "hippie translation" (meaning somewhat erratic). And yes, the hippie translator in question had rendered the line with strict literalness: "Are you going to walk your goat?" Which was of no help whatsoever.

Now, I did suspect it might be some Dutch expression I didn't know (Dutch is not my strongest language by a long shot), but a Google search yielded nothing but a series of (admittedly very cute) photos of goats.

As I was flailing around, I started wondering if this was an insulting reference to Jopo's trademark foot-tall quiff (earlier in the book someone else had referred to him as "that idiot with the shark-fin on his head")... but fortunately, like Woody Allen pulling out Marshall McLuhan in Annie Hall, I had access to the unimpeachable prime source and so I cut to the chase and just emailed Joost and asked him.

Turns out "letting out the goat" is Dutch slang for going to take a pee. Aha! (And Duh!)

Thus:

Joost Swarte panel - English

I always loved that phrase. One big satisfaction of working as a translator is being able to drop in some of your pet expressions.

I went back and checked the French version of this story, and it turns out that translator also literally translated it as "letting out the goat," which I'm pretty sure is not a French expression for urination, or anything else. So I was apparently neither the first nor the second to fall into that particular trap; I was just the first to confess my bafflement to the author. Sometimes confessing one's ignorance is the wisest thing one can do.

...Unless Joost is just fucking with me. (Or, as the English would say, taking the piss out of me.)

PS: Talk about burying the lede: Yes, four years after we announced it, Joost Swarte has finally delivered the files for this book, and all I can say is that given how wonderful this book is and how utterly meticulous his (and his assistants') work on reconstructing the pages (from a rat's nest of originals, negatives, photostats, etc.) has been, that now seems like an entirely reasonable wait. You will not be disappointed.



Daily OCD: 4/4/11
Written by Mike Baehr | Filed under Steve DitkoPopeyePaul KarasikKim ThompsonJoost SwarteJasonFrank SantoroFletcher HanksEC SegarDaily OCDCatalog No 439Blake Bell 4 Apr 2011 3:07 PM

Today's Online Commentary & Diversions:

I Killed Adolf Hitler I Shall Destroy All the Civilized Planets

List: At Techland - Time.com, Douglas Wolk names I Killed Adolf Hitler by Jason and I Shall Destroy All the Civilized Planets by Fletcher Hanks to a short list of "The Funniest Comics Ever"

Catalog No. 439: Burlesque Paraphernalia and Side Degree Specialties and Costumes

Review: "Last year, Fantagraphics reproduced Catalog No. 439 of the DeMoulin Brothers – the most extensive depiction of initiation contraptions and ritual outfits used by Freemasons and other fraternal orders, like the Odd Fellows, the Knights of Pythias, and E. Clampus Vitus. Bearing the title Burlesque Paraphernalia and Side Degree Specialties and Costumes, this wacky book may shed a shred of light into the outer sanctum of these associations – unless, of course, it is actually a hoax disseminated to lead us astray. [...] Even if Enlightenment should, as always, prove ever elusive, the illustrated designs of Edmund DeMoulin and the handiwork of his brothers Ulysses and Erastus, as reproduced in Burlesque Paraphernalia, will still deliver amusing, if sadistic, anthropology. [...] Book lovers... will fall for its hundred and fifty full-page plates of machines of untold mischief. " – Jeffrey Wengrofsky, Coilhouse

Unexplored Worlds: The Steve Ditko Archives Vol. 2

Review/Commentary: "...I end up seeing Ditko’s work arc from earliest 'dependent work' as he calls it, the charming, imaginative comics collected in Unexplored Worlds, the rockets, superintelligent monkeys, green insect aliens seeking earthling wives, paintings that lead to another world, angelic visitors and poetically just twist endings, to his later work created entirely on his own terms and for his own purpose, but less effective as his characters become 'ciphers' and his design, text-heavy." – Carol Borden, The Cultural Gutter

Joost Swarte

Commentary: David Chelsea posts his email debate with Kim Thompson re: Joost Swarte's use of perspective. Kim: "Maybe you aren’t seeing the forest for the trees — or the ground below the trees that comprises the forest because you’re looking at it from a horizontal-oblique perspective." Zing!

TCJ.com

Craft: At TCJ.com, Frank Santoro applies his lessons in page proportion and layout to a Tintin page by Hergé

Popeye Vol. 1: "I Yam What I Yam"

Plug: Robot 6's Tim O'Shea reports that his 11-year-old son is absorbed in Popeye Vol. 1

The Late, Great Fantagraphics
Written by Kim Thompson | Filed under Walt KellyTS SullivantTim KreiderThe Comics JournalShimura TakakoRoy CraneRick MarschallRichard SalaPopeyePirus and MezzoPaul HornschemeierMonte SchulzMomeMark KalesnikomangaKrazy KatJoost SwarteJoe SaccoGilbert HernandezGeorge HerrimanErnie BushmillerEdward GoreyEC SegarComing AttractionsCaptain EasyAlexander Theroux 5 Jan 2011 1:23 PM

Pogo Vol. 1 by Walt Kelly
(Click to enlarge)

Yeah, we're great, and our books are late. Why, what did you think the headline meant?

Anyway, a new year is upon and it's time to 'fess up about all the late Fantagraphics titles you were expecting to have by now, and don't, because we suck. Specific apologia and weaseling have been added to some titles, others we just pass under mortified silence. 2011 will be better!

The following are printed, on their way to us across the Pacific Ocean, and expected to be available in January or February 2011:
FREEWAY by Mark Kalesniko (usually original graphic novels are late because the author was overly optimistic about how long it would take to write and draw it, but this time it was entirely our fault.)
KING OF THE FLIES VOLUME 2: THE ORIGIN ON THE WORLD by Mezzo and Pirus (and in case you're wondering, Volume 3 is scheduled for September 2012 at this point)
KRAZY AND IGNATZ: 1919-1921 by George Herriman
THE LAST ROSE OF SUMMER by Monte Schulz (again, entirely our fault and neither the author's nor cover artist Cathy Malkasian 's, both of whom are champs and pros.)
MOME #21 edited by Eric Reynolds
POPEYE VOLUME 5: "WHAT'S A JEEP?" by E.C. Segar
ROY CRANE'S BUZ SAWYER VOL. 1: THE WAR IN THE PACIFIC
THE STRANGE CASE OF EDWARD GOREY (NEW EXPANDED HARDCOVER EDITION) by Alexander Theroux
TWILIGHT OF THE ASSHOLES by Tim Kreider

The following are at the printer and are expected to be available in March or April 2011:
THE COMICS JOURNAL #301
LOVE FROM THE SHADOWS by Gilbert Hernandez
SAFE AREA GORAZDE: THE SPECIAL EDITION by Joe Sacco

The following are expected to ship sometime during the Spring of 2011:
CAPTAIN EASY: THE COMPLETE SUNDAY STRIPS VOLUME 2 by Roy Crane (we had a hard time collecting a few of the last strips on this one-but we're almost there now)
DRAWING POWER edited by Rick Marschall and Warren Bernard
WANDERING SON BOOK ONE by Shimura Takako

The following have been rescheduled:
THE ANTIC CARTOON ART OF T.S. SULLIANT will be reformatted, rethought, re-solicited, and released in early 2012
FORLORN FUNNIES VOLUME 1 by Paul Hornschemeier will be released in the Summer of 2011
THE HIDDEN by Richard Sala will be re-solicited and released in July 2011
HOW TO READ NANCY will be re-solicited and released in 2012 in a vastly expanded version from what we first expected
IS THAT ALL THERE IS? (né MODERN SWARTE, originally announced for 2007) in late Fall 2011: Yes, Joost has turned in all the files and publishers in three countries are synchronizing their watches!
NANCY IS HAPPY will be released in late 2011: It turns out that there was more production work than we anticipated to make the book as perfect as humanly possible.)
POGO VOLUME 1 will be released in the Fall of 2011 - yes, seriously, for real this time

Is That All There Is? by Joost Swarte























Things to see: 5/13/10
Written by Mike Baehr | Filed under videoTim HensleyThings to seeSteven WeissmanrockRenee FrenchPaul HornschemeierNoah Van SciverMichael KuppermanJosh SimmonsJoost SwarteJohn HankiewiczJim BlanchardfashionEleanor DavisDerek Van Gieson 13 May 2010 2:55 PM

Daily clips & strips — click for improved/additional viewing at the sources:

Wally Gropius - Tim Hensley

Tim Hensley celebrates the release of Wally Gropius with what seems to be a new and/or previously unseen Wally drawing

I, Anonymous - Steven Weissman

• This week's "I, Anonymous" spot by Steven Weissman

Riverside - John Hankiewicz

• "Riverside" is a new lithograph by John Hankiewicz

Magnolia - Eleanor Davis

• Look closely at "Magnolia" (above) and "Oak," two Eleanor Davis pieces for Tree Show VI at GRSF

Lady Gaga - Michael Kupperman

Michael Kupperman artwork in the Lady Gaga anthology fanzine Prison for Bitches (which also includes Johnny Ryan)

The Tiger & The Princess of Hearts - Jim Blanchard

• "The Tiger & The Princess of Hearts" is Jim Blanchard's piece in the tiger-themed group show Tiger Tiger Burning Bright opening at Roq la Rue gallery in Seattle tomorrow night

Noah Van Sciver's animated music video for Lust-Cats of the Gutters

Lexie Super Dog - Josh Simmons

• A portrait of "Lexie Super-Dog" by Josh Simmons on his & Wendy Chin's Quackers blog

rock11sm - Renee French

• It's, like, a rock made out of trussed-up hair, or something, by Renee French

Relax - Paul Hornschemeier

• It's Paul Hornschemeier's new weekly t-shirt design for his Forlorn Funnies Shirt Shop

The New Yorker cover by Joost Swarte

Joost Swarte covers The New Yorker (via The Beat)

Tales of Abstraction House - Derek Van Gieson

Devil Doll - Derek Van Gieson

Sinestro - Derek Van Gieson

• Your daily deluge of Derek Van Gieson: "Abstraction House," a "Devil Doll" outtake, and supervillain record-shopping habits

Joost Swarte & Robert Crumb read Genesis
Written by Mike Baehr | Filed under Robert CrumbJoost Swarte 22 Feb 2010 1:52 PM

Swarte & Crumb read Genesis

What we have here is an illustration by Joost Swarte depicting himself and Robert Crumb in Crumb's workroom paging through Crumb's Genesis, with a little help from a certain bearded, white-robed fellow. It was produced by (I think) Griffioen Grafiek as a limited-edition giclee print and can be ordered online from Pinceel out of Belgium. Spotted by our own Jason T. Miles.

Daily OCD: 1/5/09
Written by Mike Baehr | Filed under reviewsPrince ValiantKevin HuizengaJoost SwarteHal FosterGilbert HernandezGahan WilsonBest of 2009Al Columbia 5 Jan 2010 9:59 PM

Apologies for the late late Online Commentary & Diversions update:

List: Comic Book Resources continues listing their Top 100 Comics of 2009, with Pim & Francie by Al Columbia at #33 ("A totally creepy homage to the ink blot stylings of the early animation era, the book works as part horror comic, part abstract tour de force, part satire and all face melter, cementing Columbia's place as one of the most unique and mysterious voices in comics." – Kiel Phegley) and Ganges #3 by Kevin Huizenga at #20 ("a brilliant, insightful comic with inventive layouts and dead-on emotion" – John Parkin)

List: Don MacPherson of Eye on Comics names the short list for the 2009 Glass Eye Awards for Best Original Graphic Novel: "Gilbert Hernandez’s The Troublemakers was no doubt a delight for fans of the Love and Rockets writer/artist, but as an only casual reader of his work, I was surprised at how much I enjoyed it. The quirky combination of slice-of-life elements and a crime drama worked incredibly well, and while The Troublemakers boasts a connection to the world of L&R, one needn’t be aware of it or versed in those other comics to appreciate this graphic novel."

Review: "[Hal] Foster’s classic tales of knightly derring-do are a beloved part of the newspaper comics section. It’s difficult to laud Foster too excessively; he was one of the undisputed masters of the craft. A new effort to reprint the Valiant epic in sequential order is off to a roaring start with Prince Valiant, Vol. 1: 1937-1938, a handsome oversize volume reprinting the first two years’ worth of the Arthurian saga’s Sunday strips. Despite its creation in the late 1930s..., the comic strip’s otherworldly setting and taut characterization keep this an evergreen favorite for readers of all ages, an American epic born of a tale of European romance." – Aaron Ragan-Fore, Eugene Weekly

Review: "This incredible boxed set of three gorgeous hardcovers celebrates one of art's funniest and most disturbing cartoonists. ... Gahan Wilson: Fifty Years of Playboy Cartoons is the most comprehensive and attractive Wilson book ever produced." – Rick Klaw, The SF Site: Nexus Graphica

Plug: Jason Pettigrew, editor-in-chief of Alternative Press magazine, lists our forthcoming Joost Swarte collection as one of the 5 things he's most looking forward to in 2010 — except that the book is now on tap for 2011 and the title has changed from Modern Swarte to Is That All There Is?

Things to see: A new strip and sketchy stuff from Kevin Huizenga

Daily OCD: 6/17/09
Written by Mike Baehr | Filed under Zak SallyreviewsPrince ValiantNell BrinkleyLove and RocketsLeah HayesJules FeifferJoost SwarteJoe SaccoJasonGilbert HernandezDrew FriedmanCarol TylerBlazing Combat 17 Jun 2009 1:42 PM

Still catching up with Online Commentary & Diversions. There's more, but I'm out of time, so more catch-up tomorrow!

• Review: "The backbone of the family, and also its Achilles heel, Luba is a larger-than-life personality who jumps off every page, whether she's the focus of the segment or just a background player. [Gilbert] Hernandez collects over 100 stories here, ranging from graphic novellas to single-page episodes, with his usual dizzying cocktail of sexual intrigue, humor and soap opera-style angst." - Publishers Weekly (Starred Review - near end of page)

• Review: "[You'll Never Know Book 1] becomes a meditation on how the 'art' of our lives, its story, is found all around us, if we but pay attention... [R]ecommended... [and] illuminating." - Mark London Williams, The SF Site: Nexus Graphica

• Review: "There are two excellent interviews in the back of [Blazing Combat]... The interviews are part of what makes the comic so fascinating. Of course, it wouldn’t matter if the stories weren’t good, and they are... [Archie] Goodwin does a fine job keeping each story fresh and even getting into the heads of the characters... It’s a testament to Goodwin’s ability that he manages to write 28 (generally) anti-war stories, but never feels like he’s simply repeating himself... The art helps the book shine, as well... There’s not a poorly-illustrated story in the entire book, and some are eerily beautiful... These are both excellent comics and fascinating historical documents, and Blazing Combat is totally worth a read." - Greg Burgas, Comic Book Resources

• Review: "...[T]here’s an undercurrent in this anthology [Boody: The Bizarre Comics of Boody Rogers] that points to something curious and bizarre that’s worth the same sort of glance as a fake freak in a smarmy sideshow." - the johnandjanaverse

• Profile: Publishers Weekly talks to Trina Robbins about editing our "luscious" collection The Brinkley Girls: The Best of Nell Brinkley's Cartoons from 1913-1940. Sample quote: "It's just fascinating to me that you can open your dictionary and go to G and find Gibson Girls but you can't find Brinkley Girls under B."

• Profile: I don't think I would have guessed that Joost Swarte was influenced by Ed "Big Daddy" Roth, but so says he: The Walrus spotlights Swarte, who provides a cover illustration for the current issue, and whose long-gestating Fantagraphics collection Modern Swarte is still in the works

• Interview: Zak Sally professes a longstanding crush on Maggie & Hopey in a Q&A with Minnesota Reads

• Interview: At Newsarama, Zack Smith enjoys a lengthy chat with Jules Feiffer (and breaks the news to him that Explainers is nominated for an Eisner Award... oops, sorry Jules)

• List: Moolies posts his/her (?) "Top 10 graphic novels," including Safe Area Gorazde by Joe Sacco ("It's truly appalling reading, and the reason is because he's such a great artist, and a great listener too"), Peter Bagge's Buddy Bradley saga ("There's so much painful and embarrassing truth in Bagge's work, and it's carried along by a sharp, wisecracking sense of humour"), and Love and Rockets ("A stunning, extraordinary, even feminist (or humanist) body of work... It's always a joy, and I'm so glad they're still writing these stories")

• Plug: "We should all learn about Nell Brinkley in college. So if you’re currently in college, go check out The Brinkley Girls already. And if you’re out of college already, well go check it out anyway, because everyone seriously needs to see this book—Brinkley was that good." - J. Caleb Mozzocco, Newsarama

• Plug: "As fans of art and cool things in general we are thankful to a friend who sent us the following link to: The Brinkley Girls: The Best of Nell Brinkley's Cartoons from 1913-1940, edited by Trina Robbins... Nell was an amazing illustrator." - The GIV Family Blog

• Plug: Joakim Gunnarsson raves about the "fantastic" black & white edition of Prince Valiant Vol. 1, with photos

• Plug: Comic Book Junkie takes note of our video previews on YouTube (which are also visible, alongside extensive photo previews, in our Flickr stream)

• Plug: Annika in London recommends Leah Hayes's "beautiful book" Funeral of the Heart for the second time

• Plug: 999 spotlights Jason's Low Moon and, according to the Google translation from Spanish, calls us "blithe kids"

• Things to see: Airforce Amazons illustrates a blog post of topical world events with a two-page spread from Joe Sacco's Safe Area Gorazde

• Things to see: Friedman (Drew) does Ferrell (Will) for the NY Observer

Sketchbook: Karasik
Written by Eric Reynolds | Filed under Paul KarasikJoost SwarteFletcher Hanksart 3 Nov 2008 6:25 AM

Channeling Joost Swarte & Fletcher Hanks