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Category >> Jordan Crane

Things to see: 3/8/10
Written by Mike Baehr | Filed under Zippy the PinheadTom KaczynskiThings to seeSteve DitkoSergio PonchioneRobert GoodinRichard SalaRenee FrenchMichael KuppermanMark KalesnikoJordan CraneJohnny RyanJohn HankiewiczJim Florahooray for HollywoodHans RickheitGabrielle BellFrank SantorofashionDerek Van GiesonDame DarcyBill Griffith 8 Mar 2010 6:17 PM

I might have to start posting these art-blog roundups on the weekends too... these Monday updates are outa control...

Zippy the Pinhead - the Movie

• Airbrushed Zippy the Pinhead art (artist unknown)! Posting this on Facebook, Bill Griffith says "This is the 2-page spread ad for the 'Zippy Movie' from Variety magazine, 3/29/90. The ad was taken out by the Aspen Film Society (at that time they were the producers of the movie) in hopes of attracting a studio/distributor. Are we in turnaround yet?" More about it (and the likewise never-to-be Zippy TV show series) here

Galactic Breakdown - Johnny Ryan

• Check out all the artwork from the Covered art show here on the Secret Headquarters Flickr page — I'm pretty sure I haven't featured this Johnny Ryan piece on Flog before — and organizer/curator Robert Goodin has a report and photos from the opening on his blog

Oscar - Michael Kupperman

Michael Kupperman awards the Oscar for best Oscar

sketchbook - John Hankiewicz

John Hankiewicz does Ditko , plus another sketchbook page

Penn's Best - Frank Santoro & Jon Good

• A 1994 minicomic by Frank Santoro & Jon Good

necklace - Dame Darcy

Jewelry and accessories "made from 100% genuine doll" by Dame Darcy

Peculia meets Jack the Ripper - Richard Sala

• Several new pieces by Richard Sala available at Comic Art Collective or direct via Richard's blog

Aspects of Love - Jim Flora

Detail of a mid-1990s Jim Flora illustration

Lucky - Gabrielle Bell

The conclusion of Gabrielle Bell's New York story

Woman with Freckles - Mark Kalesniko

Mark Kalesniko is really channeling Egon Schiele in this one

La Paura si chiama Poliedricus! - Sergio Ponchione

• Yowie! Sergio Ponchione presents a full-color Grotesque story from the pages of the new issue of Linus

thewlis 3 - Renee French

This one from Renee French is even creepier as the follow-up to this one

Ectopiary page 14 - Hans Rickheit

Cochlea and Eustachia - Hans Rickheit

Ectopiary page 14 and a Cochlea and Eustachia one-pager from Hans Rickheit

Abstraction House - Derek Van Gieson

More from "Tales of Abstraction House" by Derek Van Gieson

structure - Tom Kaczynski

• Three more structures by Tom Kaczynski: "incoherent amalgamation," "basalt garden" and, above, "The Tomb of Jack Kirby"

What Things Do - Jordan Crane

• More new Jordan Crane at What Things Do

Things to see: 3/1/10
Written by Mike Baehr | Filed under Things to seeSteven WeissmanRichard SalaRenee FrenchNate NealMark KalesnikoKevin HuizengaJordan CraneJim FloraJim BlanchardHans RickheitGabrielle BellFrank SantoroDerek Van GiesonAnders Nilsen 1 Mar 2010 2:02 PM

Good grief, all you art bloggers sure stay busy over the weekends...

comic by Frank Santoro

• Man, remember the awesome comics that Tower Records' Pulse magazine ran back in the 1990s, like this one from Frank Santoro?

Oz art - Richard Sala

A piece by Richard Sala for an Oz-themed art show at Gallery Meltdown in L.A. which opened on Saturday (Steven Weissman's in it too)

sketches - Steven Weissman

• Speaking of Steven Weissman, here are some ideas he's working on

sketches - Jim Flora

Nautical sketches circa 1950s by Jim Flora

Britney Spears - Jim Blanchard

Mooseheart Faith - Memories of the Future - Jim Blanchard

• Two from Jim Blanchard, who describes the commissioned drawing at top as "Definitely the high point of my art career so far"; at bottom, a record cover (click through for even more groovy lettering on the back cover)

Mother with Child - Mark Kalesniko

A series of mother-with-child sketches by Mark Kalesniko

swim - Renee French

God damn, Renee French

Bar - Kevin Huizenga

Fielder - Kevin Huizenga

Alain Saint-Ogan fan art and "F" is for Fielder by Kevin Huizenga

sketchbook - Anders Nilsen

• This and two more sketchbook spreads by Anders Nilsen

Ectopiary page 13 - Hans Rickheit

monkey - Hans Rickheit

Hans Rickheit's Ectopiary page 13, plus a singing monkey

Lucky - Gabrielle Bell

The continuation of a New York Lucky story by Gabrielle Bell

Janet Planet - Derek Van Gieson

Nate Neal sneaks a guy into this page of Derek Van Gieson's story

Jordan Crane

• More new Jordan Crane at What Things Do

Two-by-Fours - Charles M. Schulz

• Talk about a blockhead (haw haw): I'm Learning to Share! shares a Charles M. Schulz rarity, Two-by-Fours (via Robot 6)

Daily OCD: 2/12/10
Written by Mike Baehr | Filed under Zak SallySammy HarkhamreviewsPeanutsLove and RocketsLos Bros HernandezJordan CraneHo Che AndersonDash ShawDaily OCDCharles M Schulzaudio 12 Feb 2010 2:55 PM

Today's Online Commentary & Diversions:

Review: "Anderson’s King is most definitely NOT your feel-good, sanctifying version of King’s life that most readers are probably used to. ...[T]he MLK presented here is a multi-dimensional, gifted man … but still very much a man, nevertheless, filled with doubt, frustration, anger, arrogance, and even deceit. ... While Anderson starkly presents King’s less-than-saintly episodes... the final reaction is a fuller understanding of a great man, with inspiring ideals, and an unshakeable dedication to equality through nonviolent, loving means. ... MLK’s legacy undeniably lives on in Anderson’s King." – Terry Hong, Bookdragon (Smithsonian Asian Pacific American Program)

Review: "Dash Shaw was praised to the skies for his hefty 2008 graphic novel Bottomless Belly Button, but the 26-year-old cartoonist’s real strength so far in his career has been his short strips, which have displayed a diversity of subject matter and style that make each piece feel like something wholly new. The Unclothed Man in the 35th Century A.D.... does reveal a future master in his formative stages, working to find a balance between his interest in subtle adult relationships—teacher/pupil, flirter/flirtee, etc.—and his yen to try out new approaches to drawing and coloring. Shaw may be the cartoonist of the rising generation most capable of delivering a long-form work with the formal daring and humanity of a David Mazzucchelli or an Art Spiegelman. Consider The Unclothed Man a document of his baby steps… B+" – The A.V. Club

Plug: "The Complete Peanuts 1975-1976 comes out in March, meaning we'll be halfway through this amazing, historical publication. I can't say enough about these collections. It's not only remarkable in its simple, truthful capturing of the human condition, but a beautiful historical document of the second half of the 20th Century." – Rob Kozlowski

Interview: On the Inkstuds radio programme, Jordan Crane and Sammy Harkham have a feisty conversation with host Robin McConnell about their webcomics concern, What Things Do

Commentary: NPR 's Glen Weldon, surveying some of the connections between comics and pop music, says "Love and Rockets, by Los Bros Hernandez, wasn't just about a punk band, it was a book steeped in an anarchic punk sensibility that even today, 30 years later, still seems bracing and unapologetic."

Academia: Prof. Zak Sally presents his classroom curriculum

Aha: So that's where the Snoopy-in-a-cast storyline in the upcoming 13th volume of The Complete Peanuts came from (via Spurge)

Things to see: 2/9/10
Written by Mike Baehr | Filed under Steven WeissmanstaffRenee FrenchPaul HornschemeierKevin HuizengaJordan CraneJohn HankiewiczHernán MigoyaDebbie DrechslerDash Shaw 9 Feb 2010 5:20 PM

Gaze in wonder (and click for expanded/complete wonderment):

MoCCA Art Fest 2010 Poster - Dash Shaw

MoCCA 2010 Art Festival image by Dash Shaw

MoCCA 2010 Art Fest t-shirt - Dash Shaw

• Official images for the 2010 MoCCA Art Festival by Dash Shaw: poster (top), booklet (middle; hilarious) and t-shirt (bottom); Dash comments on his blog

XOY - John Hankiewicz

XOY, a new print by John Hankiewicz

feeder birds - Debbie Drechsler

• Don't miss Debbie Drechsler's frequent updates to her sketch blog, such as these lovely birds

Year of the Tiger - Steven Weissman

Steven Weissman's artwork for the "Year of the Tiger" show at GR2; also, the original sketch

The Order of Odd-Fish by James Kennedy - cover by Paul Hornschemeier

Paul Hornschemeier's cover art for the paperback edition of James Kennedy's novel The Order of Odd-Fish

Focus - Kevin Huizenga

• Is "Focus" a new mini from Kevin Huizenga? He never 'splains nothin' on his blog

Jordan Crane

• Part 3 of Chapter 2 of this Jordan Crane story at What Things Do

Niño Milagroso - Eric Reynolds

Niño Milagroso — an illustration for a novel by Hernán Migoya by our own Eric Reynolds

H Day - Renee French

• Don't forget to check Renee French's art blog for daily updates like this

Daily OCD: 2/9/10
Written by Mike Baehr | Filed under reviewsPeter BaggePeanutsMomeLove and RocketsLos Bros HernandezLinda MedleyJordan CraneJoe DalyJaime HernandezGilbert HernandezDaily OCDCharles M SchulzBest of 2009Abstract Comics 9 Feb 2010 5:15 PM

Online Commentary & Diversions:

List: At The Comics Journal, the back half of Rob Clough's Top 50 Comics of 2009 includes:

#29, The Complete Peanuts 1971-1972 by Charles Schulz: "Twenty-two years into his run on this strip, Schulz was still at his peak even as Peanuts was moving into a new phase."

#31, Mome Vol. 14: "The most consistently excellent anthology in comics, issue after issue."

#39, Uptight #3 (misidentified as #2) by Jordan Crane: "Both [stories] were perfectly suited for this lo-fi yet gorgeously designed comic..."

#43, The Red Monkey Double Happiness Book by Joe Daly: "Daly didn’t create just a story or a set of characters, but an entire community for readers to wander around in and become comfortable with. Equal parts Tintin and The Big Lebowski, this was a stoner detective story, with all sorts of absurd events popping up in everyday life and eventually making a kind of sense."

#46, Everybody Is Stupid Except for Me by Peter Bagge: "This is Bagge-as-Mencken, trenchantly tearing apart stupid ideas from both the left and the right and doing it while actually going out into the field, gathering facts, and talking to people. His hyper-expressive style was a perfect fit for his over-the-top political commentary."

And finally, #50, Love and Rockets: New Stories #2 by Gilbert & Jaime Hernandez: "Jaime’s conclusion to 'Ti-Girls Adventures' managed to combine rip-snorting action and compelling character work. Gilbert’s 'Hypnotwist' was both a callback to his New Love-style weirdness and yet another entry in his 'pulp movie' adaptations. ...[I]t’s clear both brothers were having such a good time following their impulses."

Review: "Abstract Comics: The title is, in itself, a manifesto. It makes official the existence of these strange objects that some will reject as a contradiction in terms: 'abstract comics.' ... In the abstract comics gathered by Molotiu, sequential ordering produces nothing on the order of a story; but solidarity between the panels is established (in more or less convincing and seducing fashions) in another mode — plastic, rhythmic and so to speak musical. Personally, I do not refuse to make a place for these creations in the field of comics, because I wish that field to be as open and as diversified in its expressions as possible, without excluding anything a priori. Nevertheless, I still note that they have closer affinities with the operating modes of contemporary art that with the ordinary ambitions of drawn literatures." – Thierry Groensteen, Neuvieme Art (excerpt and translation by Andrei Molotiu at the Abstract Comics Blog)

Review: "Perhaps the best adjective I could employ to describe Castle Waiting would be 'homey.' It’s all about the pleasures of home and the relief of being amongst family who accept you, even if they don’t happen to be related to you or even entirely human. ... Taken on the surface, it’s a perfectly cozy and enjoyable story. If one decides to delve more deeply, themes of tolerance and equality can be found gently at work, though by no means do they take precedence over the characters. Lest all of this sound a bit too quaintly domestic, let me assure you that the story is also quite funny." – Michelle Smith, Soliloquy in Blue

Things to see: 2/1/10
Written by Mike Baehr | Filed under Tom KaczynskiThings to seeOlivier SchrauwenMark NewgardenJosh SimmonsJordan CraneGabrielle BellDerek Van GiesonAnders Nilsen 1 Feb 2010 4:27 PM

In the spirit of "show don't tell" (and making my workday ever more complicated), I've decided to break the "Things to see" category (comprising artwork and other visual goodies from the Fantagraphics roster of artists) from our Daily OCD posts out into their own posts, with images. Links will take you to original sources where full/larger images can be seen. These posts may not be daily depending on what's out there — for now they may be somewhat irregular until I figure out a good rhythm. Enough of my yammerin'...

Gabrielle Bell

This blog by Tony Groutsis features illustrations by Gabrielle Bell mostly, plus Tom Kaczynski and other names the diligent comics reader might recognize

New York - Gabrielle Bell

• Speaking of Gabrielle, here's her new strip "New York"

Jordan Crane

• On What Things Do, Part 2 of Chapter 2 of the story Jordan Crane started in Uptight #3 (got that?)

Babati by Olivier Schrauwen

• Babati by Olivier Schrauwen

GirlKnifeWoods.jpg - Josh Simmons

• File name: GirlKnifeWoods.jpg, by Josh Simmons

sketchbook - Anders Nilsen

Four sketchbook spreads from Anders Nilsen

You're a Mess - Derek Van Gieson

New drawings and more new drawings from Derek Van Gieson

mural by Mark Newgarden

Mark Newgarden talks about his recent hamburger mural at Comics Comics

Daily OCD: 1/8/10
Written by Mike Baehr | Filed under reviewsPortable GrindhouseMomeJordan CraneJacques BoyreauGilbert HernandezGahan WilsoneventsBlazing CombatBest of 2009 8 Jan 2010 2:48 PM

Today's Online Commentary & Diversions:

List: On the Forbidden Planet International Blog Log, guest critic Chris Marshall's top 10 graphic novels of 2009 places Blazing Combat in a tie for 4th place: "There was a time when War Comics told War Fact. They showed us the blood, death, camaraderie and horror. [This] series did just that and didn’t hold back."

Review: "Fantagraphics has truly pulled out all the stops on the production of [Gahan Wilson: Fifty Years of Playboy Cartoons], giving it such marvelous style and pizzazz. ... But it’s the content, of course, that is truly king. If the 20th century was indeed the American century, then Wilson is a cartoonist who had a hell of a time chronicling it, mocking it, signifying it, and holding it up to the light—albeit through his own twisted lens... The work is tremendous and witty and, as always with an excellent retrospective, it offers the reader an excellent chance to walk back in time through decades of experiences, memories, turbulences and triumphs, and just plain old human oddities. What’s truly amazing is how, for more than 50 years, Wilson rarely misses a witty beat." – John Hogan, Graphic Novel Reporter

Preview/Plug: FEARnet presents some favorite pages, with commentary, from Portable Grindhouse: The Lost Art of the VHS Box

Plug: Chris Jacobs of Sub Pop Records plugs the "predictably, really great" Mome Vol. 17, which includes artwork by Rick Froberg, who plays in Sub Pop band Obits, and the release party this Sunday at Bergen Street Comics in Brooklyn, where Rick will be signing

Plug: There's much love for Jordan Crane at French blog La Soupe d'Espace

Plug: At Comic Book Galaxy, Johnny Bacardi, a Jaime Hernandez partisan when it comes to Love and Rockets, says "But this upcoming Troublemakers looks kinda interesting... despite my preference for Jaime, I think I'll pick this up when I see it..."

Daily OCD: 1/7/10
Written by Mike Baehr | Filed under The Comics JournalPeanutsJordan CraneJoe SaccoJasonHo Che AndersonCarol TylerBest of 2009 7 Jan 2010 3:32 PM

Online Commentary & Diversions

List: Any best-of list that leads off with a Maria Bamford reference is all right with me. NPR's Glen Weldon rounds up his best graphic novels of 2009, including You'll Never Know, Book 1:  A Good and Decent Man by C. Tyler ("...Tyler lets her warm, fluid art draw the parallels between herself and her father, and hint at a darker story behind it all") and Low Moon by Jason ("The deadest of deadpan humor. Jason's cartoony, utterly affectless characters interact is ways that are horrible, hilarious and sad — often at the same time.")

List: At Ain't It Cool News, Mark L. Miller names I Killed Adolf Hitler by Jason to his Top Ten Independent Comics of the 2000s

List: Josh Flanagan of iFanboy names The Best Comics of the Decade, including Palestine by Joe Sacco: "More than any of the documentaries or news stories I've seen, Palestine shaped my view about what things are like in the Palestinean territories. Joe Sacco spent time with the people who live there, and explored the sticky, nearly untenable situation that persists today. Sacco's cartoons put a human face on the people involved, and it's a stunning work, comics or otherwise."

List: Library Journal knows that no list of 24 Graphic Novels for African American History Month would be complete without King: The Special Edition by Ho Che Anderson: "Widely acknowledged as a masterpiece, this award-winning biography invokes King’s flaws, tragedies, and triumphs."

List: The owner of the Love & Maggie blog lists a personal Top 10 All-Time Issues of The Comics Journal; the ones that are still in print are #59, #71, #238, #250, and #298

List: Online Universities judges Jordan Crane's The Last Lonely Saturday to have one of the 50 Most Captivating Covers of All Time

Commentary: The Hooded Utilitarian's Noah Berlatsky tells a funny anecdote about Peanuts and spiritual enlightenment

Daily OCD: 12/31/09
Written by Mike Baehr | Filed under Tony MillionaireSteve BrodnerPrince ValiantPeanutsPaul KarasikMichael KuppermanKevin HuizengaJordan CraneJohnny RyanJoe SaccoJacques TardiIvan BrunettiHumbugHans RickheitHal FosterGahan WilsonFletcher HanksDavid LevineDash ShawCharles M SchulzBlazing CombatBest of 2009Al Columbia 31 Dec 2009 12:38 PM

Whew, what a year! Online Commentary & Diversions returns next week.

List: Comic Book Resources continues listing their Top 100 Comics of 2009, with Johnny Ryan's Prison Pit: Book 1 at #75 ("A huge kick to the solar plexus, not just in terms of the way-beyond-NC-17 level of gore and bodily fluids on display, but also the sheer wealth of no-holds barred imagination and utter sense of play that's on every page. The craftsmanship on display is just as striking as the violence." – Chris Mautner) and The Squirrel Machine by Hans Rickheit at #56 ("Few artists in comics can tell surreal stories with the level of clarity and precision that Hans Rickheit achieves... In the same way that David Lynch squeezes compelling characters and memorable scenes onto film amid dark and obscured circumstances, Rickheit renders a feeling portrait of a young mad scientist named Edmund in one of the 2009's most inimitable reads." – Brian Warmoth)

List: Jeff Smith names his favorite comics of the decade, including The Complete Peanuts ("Revolutionary.") and Bottomless Belly Button by Dash Shaw ("I was also impressed by the mysteries in the story — and really impressed by Shaw’s restraint in revealing only what he had to — leaving much for the imagination, and keeping my thoughts on the book and its meaning for days afterward.")

List: The writers at Robot 6 name their favorite comics of 2009: Tim O'Shea lists Blazing Combat in his top 10; Chris Mautner lists his 10 favorite reprints, including Humbug ("excellent... packaged with loving care and an eye towards history"), Gahan Wilson: Fifty Years of Playboy Cartoons ("an excellent package of A+ material from a great cartoonist"), Prince Valiant Vol. 1 ("a lively, vibrant strip full of thrilling action and humor"), and You Shall Die by Your Own Evil Creation! ("More Fletcher Hanks? Yes please."); Sean T. Collins's top 25 includes Pim & Francie by Al Columbia at #1, West Coast Blues by Tardi & Manchette at #11, Ganges by Kevin Huizenga at #13, Tales Designed to Thrizzle Vol. 1 by Michael Kupperman at #14, You Are There by Tardi & Forest at #16, The Squirrel Machine by Hans Rickheit at #17, and Johnny Ryan's Prison Pit: Book 1 at #23; and J.K. Parkin lists Ganges #3 ("a brilliant, insightful comic")

List: Comics Alliance's thematic Best of 2009 list names You Shall Die by Your Own Evil Creation! "Best Indie Reprint Volume" ("The utterly insane adventures of the space wizard Stardust continue to be some of the most brilliantly surrealist comics around."), Pim & Francie by Al Columbia "Best Glimpse into a Terrifying Universe that will Haunt my Dreams for Years to Come," and Ganges #3 by Kevin Huizenga "Best comic to read when you can't sleep"

List: Mike Sterling mentions some of his highlights of the past decade, led by Schizo #4 by Ivan Brunetti and including the renaissance of classic comic strip reprints led by The Complete Peanuts

List: Brian Gibson of Edmonton's Vue Weekly lists Safe Area Gorazde by Joe Sacco as one of the Best Graphic Novels of the 2000s: "Sacco’s made comics a serious and messily truthful place for journalism."

List: Living Between Wednesdays lists The Best of 2009: Original Graphic Novels and Collections, including Blazing Combat ("Each panel of Blazing Combat is a stunning work of art, and they are beautifully preserved on heavy paper in this hardcover book. Just as relevant now as when they were first published, these stories should still draw an emotional reaction from anyone who reads them.") and Tales Designed to Thrizzle Vol. 1 by Michael Kupperman ("It’s just something that you have to sit down and read, and when you do you’ll laugh your ass off.")

List: Matthew Dick ranks Uptight #3 by Jordan Crane 7th on his top 10 Best Comics of 2009 on his Exquisite Things blog (here's his review)

List: Sandy Bilus of I Love Rob Liefeld names Tony Millionaire's Billy Hazelnuts and the Crazy Bird as one of the 6 comics he's most looking forward to in 2010

Review: "In ambition, breadth and heft, this far-ranging compilation is the worthy companion to Gilbert’s formidable Palomar volume. While capable of standing on its own, Luba is very much the continuing story of several characters now fully transplanted, unfettered and haunted, from their celebrated Mexican town to the Greater Metropolitan Land of Opportunity. Their histories grow longer, broader, more complex and richer as Hernandez’s rollicking, remorseless social comedy rolls on." – Rich Kreiner, The Comics Journal

Tribute: More on David Levine's passing from Steve Brodner

What Things Do
Written by Mike Baehr | Filed under webcomicsSammy HarkhamJordan Crane 27 Dec 2009 10:12 PM

from Only a Movie by Jordan Crane

Your first order of business is to head to whatthingsdo.com right now and gape at the jaw-dropping array of entirely free comics on view from Jordan Crane (including all 3 issues of Uptight in their entirety, The Last Lonely Saturday and much much more), Sammy Harkham, and Ted May. Oh heavens this is BIG, people.