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Category >> Leslie Stein

Daily OCD: 9/16/11
Written by Mike Baehr | Filed under Walt KellyreviewsPaul HornschemeierMichael KuppermanLove and RocketsLos Bros HernandezLeslie SteinJoe KubertJaime HernandezGilbert HernandezDrew WeingDaily OCDBill Schelly 16 Sep 2011 9:59 PM

Today's Online Commentary & Diversions:

Mark Twain's Autobiography 1910-2010

Review: "...Mark Twain’s Autobiography 1910-2010 is both hilarious and very strange. The book exudes a unique mood of giddy amazement... Credit for both the mirth and oddness belong to cartoonist Michael Kupperman, who illustrated the book based on a manuscript he says was given to him by Twain. Given the fact that the off-kilter humour of the book is very similar to the sensibility displayed in Kupperman’s earlier work, notably his dada-esque comic book Tales Designed to Trizzle, the cynical might assume that Mark Twain is only the nominal author of this book. Yet it’s fair to say that the spirit of Twain hovers near the volume.... Aside from his debt to Twain, Kupperman belongs to the tradition of erudite humor that runs from Robert Benchley to Monty Python." – Jeet Heer, The National Post

Eye of the Majestic Creature

Review: "...[Eye of the Majestic Creature] is phenomenal.... The character, Larry, who is leagues more animatic and expressive than some of the characters around her (no doubt on purpose, as the character leaps out of each panel) is responsible for carrying the entire weight of the narrative through dialog. She does so fluidly, and through nuanced avenues.... I really enjoyed this collection, and I want to see more from this creator.... There is significant depth to this fantastic story about a girl, her guitar, and the quirks associated with staying alive." – Alex Jarvis, Spandexless

Set to Sea

Review: "Set to Sea is the kind of comic that you give to people you love with a knowing look that says 'read this, you'll thank me later.' The kind of book that is not exclusively reserved for aficionados of the comics art form. The kind of work that, by virtue of its poetry, leaves the reader in an emotional state once he's read the final page, and that simply demands to be flipped through again immediately so that the reader might breathe in this adventure's perfume for a little longer." – Thierry Lemaire, Actua BD (translated from French)

The Three Paradoxes

Review: "Paul Hornschemeier uses the medium of cartooning [in The Three Paradoxes] as the message he is sending, as each new chapter in the book references different cartoon styles and axioms.... The skill of Hornschemeier is abundant on these pages, as he effortlessly transitions from style to style. Despite that, each style fits within the story; none is so strange that it breaks the reader out of the story.... The book gets a lot of information packed into its relatively smaller frame. The book’s presentation is similarly phenomenal...; it’s really solid and uniform.... I loved it. Well done, Paul." – Alex Jarvis, Spandexless

The Art of Joe Kubert

Plugs: Calvin Reid and Heidi MacDonald's list of recommended recent comics and related books for Publishers Weekly includes The Art of Joe Kubert by Bill Schelly ("The great war artist’s entire history is surveyed in spectacular fashion, along with critical commentary by Schelly") and Pogo: The Complete Daily & Sunday Comic Strips, Vol. 1: Through the Wild Blue Wonder by Walt Kelly ("The whimsical, wise adventures of the residents of the Okeefenokee swamp are collected in a deluxe edition for the first time")

Love and Rockets: New Stories #4

Plug: "Fantagraphics has prepared a nice preview video for the fourth and final [Final??? Not at all — I don't know where they got that idea. – Ed.] issue of Love and Rockets: New Stories in stores soon. It features a 35-page story called ‘King Vampire’. Oh boy, if even the Hernandez bros succumb to the vampire craze, this really is the end of the world now, isn’t it?" – Frederik Hautain, Broken Frontier

Fantagraphics at SPX 2011!
Written by janice headley | Filed under Warren BernardTed StearnPaul HornschemeierMomeLeslie SteinKevin HuizengaJohnny RyanJim WoodringJim RuggeventsDrew WeingDiane NoominChuck ForsmanAnders Nilsen 31 Aug 2011 8:13 AM

I am pleased as punch to present to you the Fantagraphics low-down for the 2011 Small Press Expo, happenin' September 10th & 11th in Bethesda, Maryland!

We're bringing so many beautiful new books with us, and most of these listed below aren't even in stores yet!

The Armed Garden and Other Stories [with Special Offer - Pre-Order] The Art of Joe Kubert [Pre-Order] The Extraordinary Adventures of Adèle Blanc-Sec Vol. 2: The Mad Scientist and A Dusting of Mummies [Pre-Order]

The Armed Garden by David B.
The Art of Joe Kubert, edited by Bill Schelly
The Extraordinary Adventures of Adèle Blanc-Sec, Vol. 2: The Mad Scientist and A Dusting of Mummies by Jacques Tardi

Ganges #4 [Aug. 2011] The Hidden Like a Sniper Lining Up His Shot

Ganges 4 by Kevin Huizenga
The Hidden by Richard Sala
Like A Sniper Lining Up His Shot by Jacques Tardi

Love and Rockets: New Stories #4 [Pre-Order] The Man Who Grew His Beard [Pre-Order] Mark Twain's Autobiography 1910-2010 [Pre-Order]

Love & Rockets New Stories 4 by The Hernandez Bros
The Man Who Grew His Beard
by Olivier Schrauwen
Mark Twain’s Autobiography by Michael Kupperman

Mome Vol. 22 - Fall 2011 Nuts [Pre-Order] Prison Pit: Book 3 [Pre-Order]

Mome 22, edited by Eric Reynolds
Nuts by Gahan Wilson
Prison Pit Vol. 3 by Johnny Ryan

Walt Disney's Mickey Mouse Vol. 2: Trapped on Treasure Island [Pre-Order - U.S./CANADA ONLY]

Walt Disney's Mickey Mouse box set
Walt Disney's Mickey Mouse, Vol. 2: Trapped on Treasure Island by Floyd Gottfredson

And while you're at the Fantagraphics table, picking up these excellent new titles, why not get them signed by the artists? Many will be there! Check out our action-packed signing schedule below:

Saturday, September 10th
11:00 - 12:00 PM     Chuck Forsman / Jim Rugg
12:00 - 1:00 PM       Warren Bernard / Drew Weing
1:00 - 2:00 PM         Anders Nilsen
1:00 - 3:00 PM         Kevin Huizenga
2:00 - 4:00 PM        Johnny Ryan
3:00 - 4:00 PM        Diane Noomin
3:30 - 5:30 PM         Jim Woodring
4:00 - 5:00 PM        Ted Stearn
5:00 - 7:00 PM        Leslie Stein
5:30 - 7:00 PM        Paul Hornschemeier

Sunday, September 11th
12:00 - 1:00 PM      Chuck Forsman / Ted Stearn / Drew Weing
1:00 - 2:00 PM        Warren Bernard / Anders Nilsen
1:00 - 3:00 PM        Johnny Ryan
2:00 - 3:30 PM        Leslie Stein
3:00 - 4:30 PM        Kevin Huizenga
3:00 - 5:00 PM        Jim Woodring
4:30 - 6:00 PM        Paul Hornschemeier
5:00 - 6:00 PM        Diane Noomin

And surely you've taken note of our doozy of a panel schedule by now, right? If not, check it out on the Flog! Print it out, and carry it in your pocket, or perhaps stash it in this stunning Jim Woodring SPX exclusive tote bag? In fact, you'll wanna bring an extra tote bag to carry all our incredible debuts, plus, did I mention there will be some bargain boxes?

So, be sure to stop by and say hi to Kim, Gary, and Conrad! See you at SPX!

Leslie Stein's new comic
Written by Eric Reynolds | Filed under Leslie Stein 5 Aug 2011 9:34 AM

Leslie Stein has just published a new issue  of her wonderful comic book series, EYE OF THE MAJESTIC CREATURE. The first four issues were recently collected by Fantagraphics , and this is her first new issue since that book came out. Here's a description from the Etsy listing: 

Eye of the Majestic Creature #5: "Sister Carrie"

Larrybear has moved back to New York after having lived in the countryside. She finds herself employed at a dress shop run by an absentee boss in the East Village, and living with her old friend Seashell in an infested Brooklyn apartment. Of course, Marshmallow and her anthropomorphic friends are there too, but being magical they are not allowed to leave the house. Not that this stops Marshmallow, who is becoming increasingly depressed and drinking way too much.

On a nice winter day, roaming around Manhattan, Larry finds herself drawn to the Visionary Arts Museum, and is amazed to find they are having a retrospective of Victorian Sand Counters. Inspired, Larry begins to count sand seriously, but in a world where this is largely a forgotten art form, where can it possibly take her?

Quotes throughout by Theodore Dreiser, from his fantastic 1900 book Sister Carrie.

48 pages, color cover and back cover, black and white insides, Newsprint

I love this series. Buy this now! 

Leslie will be making appearances in late Sept./early Oct. on the west coast, including APE, so stay tuned for more info.  

Daily OCD: 7/12-13/11
Written by Mike Baehr | Filed under Taking Punk to the MassesShimura TakakoRoy CranereviewsMomemangaLeslie SteinJohnny RyanJoe SaccoJim WoodringHans RickheitDaily OCDCaptain Easyaudio 13 Jul 2011 7:13 PM

Ran out of time to finish yesterday's Online Commentary & Diversions so here's a two-fer:

Wandering Son Vol. 1

Review: "With skill, restraint and a deep sensitivity to the roiling emotions involved, Shimura relates the tale of fifth-grade boy Shuichi, who wants to be a girl, and his classmate Yoshino, a girl who wants to be a boy. This is the first volume of the Japanese saga [Wandering Son] to be published in English, and translator Thorn does great work parsing the complex gender honorifics of the Japanese language. We only just begin to get to know our two leads, but Shimura's approach allows us to feel their confusion, their heartache and — when a perceptive mutual friend orchestrates a plan that starts them down the road to self-acceptance — their quiet, nervous joy." – Glen Weldon, NPR - Monkey See

Review: "Gender roles and cross-dressing are often fodder for laughs in anime and manga, but this is the most serious and thoughtful take I've seen on the subject. And I love how Shimura doesn't make things too angsty for the characters. Maybe that will come later, but for now it's more of a quiet discomfort -- the reader is finding out at the same time as the characters, and it's quite touching. ...Wandering Son is a tender take on a taboo subject. I wish it success in the American market." – Eric Henrickson, The Detroit News - Geek Watch

Review: "Wandering Son by Shimura Takako is a heartfelt story of two people who I desperately feel for and for their families and friends.... The main thing that drew me to this book was the fact that unlike a lot of western media that plays off the fact that a transgender teenager would have to deal with their friends and peers ostracising or bullying them for being different, Wandering Son goes straight for the heart, tackling the more important idea of how the person in the story feels. Reading the first volume, I can feel their awkwardness at them coming to the decision that they are different from other people and that they need to do something about it.... I want to be alongside these characters as they discover who and how they are. I want to see them triumph in ways that many of us never get to. Most of all, I want to be there at the end even if it ends in failure." – Eeeper's Choice

Review (Audio): Phillip of Eeper's Choice, Erica Friedman, and David Welsh (The Manga Curmudgeon) discuss Wandering Son Vol. 1 with hosts Ed Sizemore and Johanna Draper Carlson on the Manga Out Loud podcast. At Manga Worth Reading, Carlson notes "We talk about the value of translation/cultural end notes (which inspired a followup post by David) and the pacing of the series in light of Takako Shimura’s career. It’s a wonderful read that we all enjoyed and recommend."

Captain Easy, Soldier of Fortune: The Complete Sunday Newspaper Strips Vol. 2 (1936-1937)

Review: "Collected in oversize hardbacks that present the pages at their original size, these beautiful books restore one of the original adventure heroes of the strips -- the affable (albeit two-fisted) mercenary who was much more interested in excitement than money or women, which is what he was supposedly after. [Captain] Easy moved through a more innocent — and largely unexplored — world, and there's no better word for this adventure strip than 'charming.'" – Andrew A. Smith, Scripps Howard News

Eye of the Majestic Creature

Review: "...Leslie Stein is a young lady out of Brooklyn, NY who has been crafting literary/illustrative dub versions of her tastes and trials and laying them out in meticulously crafted yet still oodles-of-eye-fun anecdotes and tall tales. Fanta has collected them all into Eye of the Majestic Creature, a big-sized anthology of her work, with color covers and B&W insides and a whole lot of heart reproduced superbly for proper long-term keeping.... Stein's easy-on-the-eyes drawing style shows an affinity for the same greatly defined, goofy universe Pete Bagge's youthful wanderers once trolled though Seattle in... I found it irresistible, and will come back to its gentle humor and delightful glimpses into woozy alt-country gal delights again and again." – Chris Estey, Three Imaginary Girls

Taking Punk to the Masses: From Nowhere to Nevermind - A Visual History from the Permanent Collection of Experience Music Project

Review: "Growing up to this era of punk rock, I feel an initial offense taken to McMurray’s collection of punk rock relics. It seems strange and kitschy to run across a book like Taking Punk to the Masses when you lived it. My first reaction was that we are not a novelty, punk was defined from a purpose and we are that purpose, not an exploitation. But the curious person that I am, I skimmed through it. Then I skimmed through it again. Then I read it. And then I fell in love with it." – Andrew Duncan, ZapTown

The Squirrel Machine

Commentary: At Robot 6, Sean T. Collins comments on the Jim Woodring letter to Hans Rickheit we shared here yesterday: "Woodring, an intrepid chronicler of the underbrain in his own right, clearly recognized a kindred spirit in Rickheit when the younger cartoonist sent him a copy of his elaborate and powerful Fantagraphics graphic novel The Squirrel Machine."

Mome Vol. 19 - Summer 2010

Interview: The Daily Cross Hatch's Brian Heater continues his conversation with Mome editor Eric Reynolds: "My two passions in comics are old strips like Popeye and the great cartoonists that I came of age reading, like Clowes and Charles Burns and the Hernandez Brothers. But, as much as that’s the stuff I dearly love, it’s the new stuff we’re publishing, the new artists, the sort of unexpected things that, on a day to day basis, keep me motivated and keep my interest in publishing, from day to day."

Johnny Ryan

Interview (Audio): Listen to Johnny Ryan's appearance today on the Sara Tea Time podcast

Safe Area Gorazde: The Special Edition

Scene: At El Estupendo Grouchomarxista, Tiago Soares reports (in Portuguese) from a recent São Paolo bookstore appearance by Joe Sacco

Things to See: 7/11/11 Roundup
Written by Mike Baehr | Filed under Wilfred SantiagoThings to seeSteven WeissmanSteve BrodnerSophie CrumbSergio PonchioneRichard SalaRenee FrenchPaul HornschemeierOriginal ArtMichael KuppermanMatthias LehmannMark KalesnikoLilli CarréLeslie SteinKevin HuizengaJosh SimmonsJohnny RyanJim BlanchardJasonHans RickheitGilbert HernandezEleanor DavisDerek Van GiesonDame DarcyAnders Nilsen 12 Jul 2011 3:42 AM

Another marathon 2-week update:

Michael Kupperman for The New Yorker - The Hangover Part II

Horrible Bosses - Michael Kupperman for The New Yorker

Michael Kupperman did a couple of movie illustrations for The New Yorker over the last couple of weeks: The Hangover Part II (love his Galifianakis) and Horrible Bosses

I, Anonymous - Steven Weissman

Steven Weissman's latest "I, Anonymous" spots and more at his Chewing Gum in Church blog, and new and cheap original art to buy on his Comic Art Collective page

Dame Darcy painting

• The latest artwork and happenings from Dame Darcy in her new blog update

http://www.fantagraphics.com/images/flog/mike/201107/shirley%204web%20copy.jpg

Shirley Partridge by Jim Blanchard

Eleanor Davis for The New York Times

• Another Eleanor Davis spot for The New York Times

http://www.fantagraphics.com/images/flog/mike/201107/z3.jpg

Richard Sala presents original art for the 1994 "R.I.P." Paranormal Trading Cards from Kitchen Sink (man I want those), an author bio illo from 1995, and some Evil Eye back cover art

http://www.fantagraphics.com/images/flog/mike/201107/bearpal_lores.jpg

Paul Hornschemeier's art for the Crazy 4 Cult art show at Gallery 1988; also, daily drawings at The Daily Forlorn

Eye of the Majestic Creature #5 - original cover art - Leslie Stein

• It's the original cover art (pre-color) for Leslie Stein's Eye of the Majestic Creature #5, coming soon (and picking up where the book leaves off)

Click - Sergio Ponchione

Sergio Ponchione's latest strip for Linus starring Grotesque's Professor Hackensack

Focus - Kevin Huizenga

Kevin Huizenga is looking for some focus

Mrs. Wessman - Renee French

Mrs. Wessman and zombies and other subjects by Renee French

sketchbook - Sophie Crumb

Sketchbook comics & drawings by Sophie Crumb

Newt Gingrich - Steve Brodner

Steve Brodner does Newt for the New York Times Sunday Magazine

custom globe - Josh Simmons

• Here's something completely different (and neat): Josh Simmons hand-painted a custom globe as a commission

sketchbook - Anders Nilsen

Sketchbook drawings by Anders Nilsen

Roberto Clemente portrait - Wilfred Santiago

Wilfred Santiago shares the final stages of his portrait of 21, Roberto Clemente

• Another Johnny Ryan poster image for Cinefamily

Love and Rockets #27 covered by Sarah Blum

• At Covered, a de-Cubized version of Gilbert Hernandez's cover of Love and Rockets #27 by Sarah Blum

And more Things to See from the past week:

This illustration by Matthias Lehmann regarding the situation in Greece is very funny

• Sketches and illustrations old and new by Jason at his Cats Without Dogs blog, and more drawings from his youth at The Old Cat and the Dog

Images from an animation in progress by Lilli Carré

A new sketch by Mark Kalesniko

Photos and drawings for a new book project with the band The Lovely Sparrows by Derek Van Gieson

• Another batch of old sketches of medical deformities by Hans Rickheit

Things to See: 6/27/11 Roundup
Written by Mike Baehr | Filed under Tim LaneThings to seeSteven WeissmanSteve BrodnerSergio PonchioneRichard SalaRenee FrenchNoah Van SciverMomeMark NewgardenLorenzo MattottiLilli CarréLeslie SteinJasonEleanor DavisDrew FriedmananimationAnders NilsenAl Floogleman 27 Jun 2011 10:53 PM

Internazionale - Lorenzo Mattotti

• A gallery of Lorenzo Mattotti's recent cover illustrations for Internazionale's annual fiction (I think) issue

Renee French

Renee French's cute guy with awful infestation and cute guy with jaunty hat

fashion - Eleanor Davis

Recent sketches by Eleanor Davis

sketch - Sergio Ponchione

Sergio Ponchione sure does great dedication sketches — here's a recent batch

Barfo Family concept art - Drew Friedman

Drew Friedman presents the history of the Barfo Family, complete with concept art by himself, Art Spiegelman and Mark Newgarden

Tim Lane illustration

• Illos by Tim Lane for The New York Times and The Progressive

Steve Brodner for The New Yorker

Steve Brodner's illustration for a New Yorker article on racial tensions in the UK

Babes on Broadway - Richard Sala

Richard Sala's newlyweds and Babes on Broadway

Jason - pinup

Jason gets sexy with his lone attempt at cheesecake circa 1988 and a Prince illustration from the same time period — plus more teenage sketches at The Old Cat and the Dog

http://www.fantagraphics.com/images/flog/mike/201106/dancer.jpg

• Watch Lilli Carré's dancing lady in animated-GIF action

http://www.fantagraphics.com/images/flog/mike/201106/eotmc5-panel.jpg

Leslie Stein wraps up the last page of Eye of the Majestic Creature issue 5, which picks up where the book leaves off

Tiny Joe & Junior - Steven Weissman

• It's the return of Steven Weissman's Tiny Joe & Junior! Plus his latest "I, Anonymous " spot

 The Denver Spider Man - Noah Van Sciver

Noah Van Sciver presents "The True Tale of the Denver Spider Man," his story from Mome Vol. 15

sketchbook - Anders Nilsen

Sketchbook drawings & comics by Anders Nilsen

Things to See: 6/13/11 Roundup
Written by Mike Baehr | Filed under Things to seeSteven WeissmanSteve BrodnerSophie CrumbSergio PonchioneSammy HarkhamRichard SalaRenee FrenchRay FenwickPaul HornschemeierLeslie SteinLaura ParkJasonHans RickheitDerek Van GiesonDame DarcyAnders Nilsen 13 Jun 2011 8:05 PM

Elvis Costello - Jason

Spidey - Jason

• Surely you're already following Jason's Cats Without Dogs blog where he posts artwork old and new (like his 1989 Elvis Costello illustration above), as well as concise and often very funny film reviews; now he's also posting his juvenilia at The Old Cat and the Dog where you can see his teenage takes on the Punisher, Lucky Luke, the Silver Surfer, Spidey etc.

The Grave Robber's Daughter - original cover art by Richard Sala

Richard Sala gives you a behind-the-scenes look at the creation of the cover artwork for The Grave Robber's Daughter and posts a bunch of fantastic full-color concept art for as-yet unrealized story ideas

Leslie Stein

Leslie Stein presents a short sequence from the upcoming Eye of the Majestic Creature #6 (our book collects #1-4) and another short sequence from something-or-other

Professor Hackensack - Sergio Ponchione

Sergio Ponchione spotlights his contributions to the new issue of Linus

Black Dahlia Laura Park

• For reasons she can't explain, Laura Park drew this self-portrait modeled after the "black dahlia" autopsy photo

Sophie Crumb - sketchbook

• Some recent updates of sketchbook and other drawings by Sophie Crumb at her blog

National Journal - cover by Steve Brodner

Steve Brodner presents his cover illustration for the new issue of the National Journal (with his studies for the caricatures)

http://www.fantagraphics.com/images/flog/mike/201106/crick4-orig.jpg

Sammy Harkham uploaded some mostly-new stuff to his Flickr page , including the original uncropped art from the Crickets #4 cover

And more Things to See from the past week:

Steven Weissman's latest "I, Anonymous" spot on his Chewing Gum in Church blog

• Daily drawings by Paul Hornschemeier at The Daily Forlorn

• All the latest artwork and news from Dame Darcy in her new blog update

• New drawings from Renee French on her blog

• A new sketchbook strip and more collaborations with Sonnenzimmer from Anders Nilsen

• Oh god, more sketches of medical deformities by Hans Rickheit

New drawings and watercolors by Derek Van Gieson

• Recent illustrations by Ray Fenwick on his Flickr page

Daily OCD: 6/8/11
Written by Mike Baehr | Filed under reviewsPeter BaggeMark KalesnikoLove and RocketsLeslie SteinJack DavisGilbert HernandezDaily OCDaudio 9 Jun 2011 1:17 AM

Today's Online Commentary & Diversions:

Love from the Shadows

Review: "Gilbert Hernandez is one of the great craftsmen of modern comics... Hernandez’s new Fritz book, Love from the Shadows, is as bracing as a slug of bottom-shelf rotgut.... Hernandez artfully approximates the broad, thrilling badness of late-night movies and their inept special effects, and uses it as an excuse to show off some of his gifts: spacious compositions built around texture as well as forms, pauses heavy with foreboding, a sense of body language and facial expressions so acute that we can recognize both the story’s characters and the 'actors' playing those characters." – Douglas Wolk, The New York Times Sunday Book Review

Review: At CBR's Comics Should Be Good, Sonia Harris looks at Gilbert Hernandez's trilogy (so far) of "Fritz Films" graphic novels: "Filled with the longing of unfulfilled desire and lost innocence, these stories are the kind of schlock film that is accidentally life-alteringly great and I suspect Hernandez might have missed his calling as a screenwriter in the early ’60′s… That’s the thing, this kind of movie doesn’t really happen any more which is why Hernandez’ use of the comic book medium to tell Fritz’ movie roles is particularly delightful."

Eye of the Majestic Creature

Review: "In her debut release, Leslie Stein proves that comic strips are so much more than those old Cathy cartoons you'd read around the kitchen table on Sunday mornings. Instead, this semi-autobiographical tale, Eye of the Majestic Creature, follows protagonist Larrybear on a trippy journey throughout Chicago, San Francisco, and NYC in hopes of figuring out her life.... Drawn in a totally out-there Surrealist style, this quick page-turner is proof that while you might be too old for Garfield and Friends, there are cartoons you can still relate to...and love." – Liza Darwin, Nylon

Review: "...Eye of the Majestic Creature... blend[s] autobiographical self-discovery, surreal free-association, philosophical ruminations, nostalgic reminiscences and devastatingly dry wit to describe life filtered through a seductive meta-fictional interior landscape. This lady laconically tans under vastly different suns and the results are enchanting and entrancing." – Win Wiacek, Now Read This!

Yeah!

Review: "There’s precious little around for kids and especially girl readers in American funnybooks... so this intriguing and wildly imaginative series [Yeah!] which seamlessly combined fantasy, science fiction, fashion, pop and school cultures in a wild blend of frantic fun and thoroughly deserves another chance to shine." – Win Wiacek, Now Read This!

Commentary: The anecdote and photo of a little girl and Yeah! that lead off Sonia Harris's latest "Committed" column for Comic Book Resources' Comics Should Be Good are beyond adorable

Alex

Review: "Alex’s days are punctuated by alcoholic constipation, artist’s block, trashing his flat and avoiding childhood friends and his favourite teacher from high school, now a raving dipsomaniac surrounded by cats. He is also tormented by a rather good expressionist painting he apparently produced during a bender, and impure thoughts about his Asian neighbour and a beautiful former classmate... In short, a very good but not at all cheerful study of the consequences of achieving your ambitions when you’re a self-loathing dog-headed cartoonist." – Grant Buist, The Name of this Cartoon Is Brunswick

 

Freeway

Interview (Audio): Inkstuds host Robin McConnell and his cohort Colin Upton talk with fellow British Columbian Mark Kalesniko about his new graphic novel Freeway

Jack Davis: Drawing American Pop Culture: A Career Retrospective

Commentary: Our own Eric Reynolds has become ESPN.com's go-to expert on baseball cartooning — the article also discusses Jack Davis's work for Topps

Daily OCD: 6/2/11
Written by Mike Baehr | Filed under reviewsLeslie SteinDaily OCD 2 Jun 2011 7:55 PM

Today's Online Commentary & Diversions:

Eye of the Majestic Creature

Review/Interview: "When Leslie Stein’s Eye of the Majestic Creature is summarized, it sounds too precious and odd for human consumption, like some horrible blend of Ziggy and Zippy. That’s far from the case, however. The first four issues of Eye, now collected in book form by Fantagraphics, never tip over into cutesy treacle or become mired in faux hipsterism. Far from it — there’s a sense of melancholy and awareness that, while never overwhelming the book, grounds it in a recognizable reality. Adopting a simple, rubbery style, Stein manages to create both a likeable, sympathetic main character and maintain a tone of reflected grace. It’s a surprisingly strong and self-assured comic for such a relatively young creator." – Chris Mautner, The Comics Journal

"I try not to consciously draw upon any artist or movement in the creation of my work, I do not want to be derivative of anyone or thing in particular. I’m influenced by almost everything, though. I love music and film and literature and art. I take it all in and try to forget about it, knowing that some of it will come out unconsciously." – Leslie Stein, interviewed by Mautner

Review/Interview: "With a meandering tone and structure reminiscent of Eddie Campbell's Alec stories, Stein depicts a relatable (but not necessarily realistic) slice of life tale, and the fact that the stranger, more colorful elements of her story — from a female protagonist named Larrybear to anthropomorphic musical instruments to characters drawn as animals — never overwhelm the realistic elements. It's a fun and thoughtful book that has its own tone and rhythm in a way that's a triumph for the talented, young cartoonist." – Alex Dueben, Comic Book Resources

"I think the unfortunate thing with a lot of autobiographical comics is that they're all done by the same kind of people with the same kind of mentality. For me, what would be interesting would be to get an autobiographical comic done by the popular girl in high school. What her comic would be like would be way interesting to me." – Leslie Stein, interviewed by Dueben

Daily OCD: 6/1/11
Written by Mike Baehr | Filed under reviewsPeter BaggeMickey MouseLilli CarréLeslie SteinFloyd GottfredsonEleanor DavisDisneyDaily OCDBill Mauldin 2 Jun 2011 1:50 AM

Today's Online Commentary & Diversions:

Eye of the Majestic Creature

Review: "Stein's cartooning is broad and trippy, and if she occasionally becomes intoxicated with her own gimlet-eyed sensibility, she's never afraid to turn that dark wit on herself. Eye of the Majestic Creature... is ultimately the tale of a young woman rejecting the things that shaped her and attempting to figure out what comes next for her. Thanks to Stein's loose, amiable approach, you'll want to know that, too." – Glen Weldon, NPR Monkey See

Hate Annual #9

Review: "Readers needing their Peter Bagge and/or Hate fix will always get it, to some degree, in the Hate Annual. Hate Annual #9, however, is one of the better editions, and that’s probably because of what Bagge presents here. 'Heaven' and 'Hell' appeases by giving us a peek at what’s going on in Buddy’s life right now, but we also get a hefty narrative that gives us something akin to the classic madness that was Buddy and Lisa’s life in Seattle." – Leroy Douresseaux, I Reads You

Walt Disney's Mickey Mouse Vol. 1: Race to Death Valley

Plug: Los Angeles magazine spotlights Walt Disney's Mickey Mouse Vol. 1: Race to Death Valley by Floyd Gottfredson in their monthly "Reading List": "Reacquaint yourself with the real Mickey as Fantagraphics launches its effort to reprint the entire strip by the famous L.A. cartoonist."

Willie & Joe: The WWII Years

Profile: Brian Hoag of the McCook Daily Gazette has a Memorial Day tribute to Bill Mauldin: "During WWII, Bill Mauldin's cartoons appeared in the military Stars and Stripes newpaper, and showed a sarcastic humor side of war that the combat troops could relate to. Not one to shy away from pointing a finger at the top brass, General Patton tried to get Mauldin censored as George thought the 'humor' wasn't so funny." (Via Mike Lynch)

The Lagoon - Lilli Carré

Feature: Mint spotlights the work of Lilli Carré

Mome Vol. 8 - Summer 2007

Feature: Eleanor Davis got the Meathaus spotlight treatment