Home

Search / Login

Quick Links:
Latest Releases
Browse by Artist
Love and Rockets Guide
Peanuts books
Disney books
More browsing options under "Browse Shop" above


Search: All Titles

Advanced Search
Login / Free Registration
Detail Search
Download Area
Show Cart
Your Cart is currently empty.

Subscribe

Sign up for our email newsletters for updates on new releases, events, special deals and more.


Category >> Love and Rockets

Daily OCD: 11/19/10
Written by Mike Baehr | Filed under Tony MillionairereviewsMaakiesLove and RocketsJacques TardiGilbert HernandezDestroy All MoviesDaily OCD 19 Nov 2010 6:25 PM

Today's Online Commentary & Diversions:

The Extraordinary Adventures of Adèle Blanc-Sec Vol. 1: Pterror Over Paris and The Eiffel Tower Demon [Pre-Order]

Review: "...The Extraordinary Adventures of Adele Blanc-Sec Vol. 1 is finally seeing a U.S. release, and it’s long overdue. [...] The stories are romping adventures that would appeal to a young-adult crowd, but have plenty of edge and playfulness for grown readers; they function both as an evocation and sly satire of classic adventure stories like Tintin. The clever stories, with hidden meaning always skirting around their simplicity, are perfectly complemented by Tardi’s art; readers familiar with one of the greatest names in French comics will need no introduction, but newcomers will be blown away by his mixture of clean lines and rough edges, and his absolute mastery of mood as he delivers some of the finest illustrations of Paris ever crafted. [Grade] A" – The A.V. Club

Little Maakies on the Prairie

Review: "Little Maakies on the Prairie is... glorious filth rendered in high style, with frequent nods to E.C. Segar and George Herriman. It’s beautiful, it’s disgusting, it boasts a sentient goiter running amok, and it features a handsome landscape layout courtesy of Chip Kidd. Ultimately, it occupies some hinterland between hyper-repetitive and constantly surprising — not bad for a cartoon that began life scrawled on a barroom napkin. [Grade] A-" – The A.V. Club

Destroy All Movies!!!: The Complete Guide to Punks on Film [Pre-Order]

Review: "If Michael Weldon’s Psychotronic Guide To Film (and its follow-up) still sits on your shelf being of use, or at least making you smile, then Carlson and Connolly’s Destroy All Movies is the book for you. If these words mean nothing to you, then listen up: A world of film and a way of looking at them is about to open up that will change everything for you. [...] What it all adds up to is a wonderful, personal bizarre alterna-history of cinema. [...] This is a great book that will live with you for a long, long time." – John Mitchell, North Adams Transcript

Interview: At Interview, Hunter Stephenson writes of Destroy All Movies!!!, "Like an algorithm zapped across a smoggy landscape of wastoid cinema and blown-out amps — from the sleaze of 42nd Street to Malcom McLaren's London — no suspect VHS or DVD was left unturned in the hunt for liberty spikes, rebellious acts, and agape mouths of paled normies. ...[E]ach film is allotted a paragraph to several pages for reviews, supplemental interviews, and analysis that range from wittily divisive (Todd Phillips's Hated) to impassioned reconsideration (Valley Girl), all written in a fluid, knowledgeable manner and laid out in the clean and smart design expected of Fantagraphics, the book's publisher," and talks to editors Bryan Connolly & Zack Carlson, who says "Penelope Spheeris's Suburbia... is actually my favorite film of all time, and it inspired the entire book on the deepest levels. Spheeris wanted to tell a story about believable kids and a horrible struggle, so she cast real kids to play those parts. It's almost entirely non-actors, and that movie is the wildest for me. Punk or not, it's the best movie I ever saw."

Plug: Brazilian site A Criação features Destroy All Movies!!!

Plug: "Destroy All Movies!!! The Complete Guide to Punks on Film is an exhaustive reference work that is every bit as brash and entertaining as its subject matter." – Notcot

Plug: Maximum Rocknroll plugs the Destroy All Movies!!! tour: "If you live near SF or LA and love punxploitation movies like I do, you’re in for a treat this weekend. Brush your long hair into a mohawk, get some sushi and don’t pay, then head to the movie theater for some bad dialog and pointless violence…"

Love and Rockets Book 23: Luba: Three Daughters

Review: "The inescapable ripples of long-ago events over which the characters we love had no control, and the ripples their own shitty actions send out, ensnaring others: That’s what hit me so hard about Three Daughters. Luba, Fritz, and Petra can have all the wacky sex adventures they can stand — they’re still paying for someone else’s sins in a way that can just clear the decks of their lives at a moment’s notice." – Sean T. Collins, Attentiondeficitdisorderly

Daily OCD: 11/17/10
Written by Mike Baehr | Filed under Ray FenwickMoto HagiomangaLove and RocketsJaime HernandezGilbert HernandezFantagraphics BookstoreDrew WeingDestroy All MoviesDaily OCDBest of 2010audio 17 Nov 2010 5:51 PM

Today's Online Commentary & Diversions:

A Drunken  Dream and Other Stories [Pre-Order]

List: Deb Aoki of About.com: Manga names A Drunken Dream and Other Stories by Moto Hagio the Best New Manga of 2010: "Conjoined twins who share a painful co-existence. A young girl rejected by her mother who can only see her as an iguana. Ill-fated lovers who are doomed to be separated in several lifetimes. These characters came to life in this collection of smart, sensitive and thought-provoking short stories created by master storyteller Moto Hagio."

Set to Sea

List: Drew Weing's Set to Sea is on YALSA's long-list of 2011 Great Graphic Novels for Teens Nominations: "A massive lug, who also happens to be an aspiring poet, is kidnapped and set to sea and discovers hardship and wisdom he never imagined." (via The Comics Reporter)

Love and Rockets Book 21: Luba: The Book of Ofelia

Review: "It makes my job as a critic a lot harder when I’ve spent nearly an entire book composing its review in my head only for the final few pages to smash it to smithereens. In that sense, reviewing Luba: The Book of Ofelia is hard work." – Sean T. Collins, Attentiondeficitdisorderly

Destroy All Movies!!!: The Complete Guide to Punks on Film [Pre-Order]

Interview (Audio): Destroy All Movies!!! editors Zack Carlson and Bryan Connolly appeared on KBOO-FM Community Radio out of Olympia WA on Monday for an interview with host Erin Yanke — listen here

Profile: John Beaton of Seattle University's The Spectator profiles Fantagraphics Bookstore & Gallery and its curator Larry Reid

Mascots

Plug: Public School's Will Bryant spotlights Ray Fenwick's Mascots

Love and Rockets: New Stories #3 [with FREE Signed Bookplate]

Commentary: At The Wright Opinion, Brendan Wright shares his thoughts about the longevity of Las Locas: "I’m as excited as anyone that the graphic novel is gradually becoming the standard model of the modern comic book, but among its many virtues, the fact that Love and Rockets has always been presented as a series is important. This is the comic book that elevated the serial format of comics from soap opera to serialized literature. It’s hard to wait between the annual installments, but it’s worth it to check in with old friends, and whatever else he does with the rest of his creativity, I’m happy that Hernandez always finds time to keep up with the 'Locas' world."

Daily OCD: 11/15/10
Written by Mike Baehr | Filed under Usagi YojimboStan SakaireviewsLove and RocketsJacques TardiGilbert HernandezDestroy All MoviesDaily OCD 15 Nov 2010 3:40 PM

Today's Online Commentary & Diversions:

 Usagi Yojimbo: The Special Edition [Pre-Order]

Gift Guide: Bleeding Cool's "Twenty Fat Expensive Comic Gifts for Christmas" includes Usagi Yojimbo: The Special Edition ("1200 pages folks. That’s sixty issues worth in one book") and The Extraordinary Adventures of Adèle Blanc-Sec Vol. 1 which we should note is neither very fat nor very expensive ("Now a major French motion picture. But always a great comic book")

Destroy All Movies!!!: The Complete Guide to Punks on Film [Pre-Order]

Review: "Most film books are dry academic treatises whose ultimate destiny is to sit unused on a college library shelf. Destroy All Movies!!! A Complete Guide to Punks on Film is the antithesis of this musty stereotype. This massive punk rock movie encyclopedia is totally alive. [...] Hardliners might not appreciate the mix of bona fide punk rock movies and pop culture detritus, but the idiosyncratic choices are part of the book's appeal. [...] Finally, it would be dumb not to discuss how great Destroy All Movies looks. Designer Jacob Covey did an excellent job here." – Rodney Perkins, Ain't It Cool News

Love and Rockets Book 19: Luba in America

Review: "A series of observations on the first volume of the Luba trilogy [Luba in America]: [...] Find me another comic where... the cartoonist has struck this precise balance of creating characters who are totally plausible and also totally ridiculous, riddled with mysterious voids and yet so well-defined that you just know you can fill in the blanks if you try hard enough – and I’ll eat my hat." – Sean T. Collins, Attentiondeficitdisorderly

Daily OCD: 11/11/10
Written by Mike Baehr | Filed under Robert CrumbreviewsLove and RocketsLos Bros HernandezJacques TardiDaily OCD 11 Nov 2010 5:44 PM

Today's Online Commentary & Diversions:

The Extraordinary Adventures of Adèle Blanc-Sec Vol. 1: Pterror Over Paris and The Eiffel Tower Demon [Pre-Order]

Review: "First off: a round of applause to Kim Thompson for his translation of The Extraordinary Adventures of Adele Blanc-Sec. The French title of the first volume translates literally as 'Adele and the Beast,' and that was the title of the previous American version (20 years or so ago) — but 'Pterror over Paris' is way funnier, and in line with the overheated, not entirely serious style of this book. ...[T]his is really charming stuff... and it's super-fun." – Douglas Wolk, TIME/Techland

The Sanctuary

Review: "This is a powerful tale about creativity, morality, verity and above all, responsibility which demands that the reader work for his reward. As an exploration of imagination it is subtly enticing, but as an examination of Mankind’s unchanging primal nature The Sanctuary is pitilessly honest. Abstract, symbolic, metaphorical yet gloriously approachable, this devastatingly clever saga is a 'must-see' for any serious fan of comics and every student of the human condition." – Win Wiacek, Now Read This!

Love and Rockets Library (Short Stories): Amor Y Cohetes [with FREE Signed Bookplate]

Review: "In collecting all the (mostly) non-Locas, non-Palomar odds’n'ends from the initial run of Love and Rockets from both Gilbert and Jaime — and Mario too, the 'sometimes Y' to Beto and Xaime’s AEIOU — Amor y Cohetes reinforces [a particular] conception of the brothers’ working relationship. It’s not one-upsmanship, it’s not trading eights, it’s more a matter of pulling from a collective pool of ideas about comics." – Sean T. Collins, Attentiondeficitdisorderly

The Complete Crumb Comics Vol. 4 [Sold Out]

Interview: For the L.A. Times Hero Complex blog, Deborah Vankin talks to Robert Crumb (actually an outtake from a slightly longer Crumb interview done for a feature on Joyce Farmer running in the print version of the Times soon): "Maybe I’m less angry. I don’t know. Actually, I’m not less angry. When I go back to America, after a few days I am once again filled with this kind of angry alienation and disgust with this thing there that America has got — you have no idea how pervasive it is there. The public relations and propaganda put out by the corporate mono-culture there is so pervasive."

Daily OCD: 11/8/10
Written by Mike Baehr | Filed under Steve DitkoreviewsLove and RocketsLos Bros HernandezJaime HernandezGilbert HernandezFour Color FearDestroy All MoviesDaily OCDCarol TylerBlake Bell 8 Nov 2010 6:20 PM

Today's Online Commentary & Diversions:

Unexplored Worlds: The Steve Ditko Archives Vol. 2 [Pre-Order]

Review: "This week I read Unexplored Worlds, the second collection of pre-Spider-Man comics drawn by Steve Ditko. This handsomely designed volume mainly collects work Ditko did for Charlton, a mix of sci-fi, western and post-code horror stories. Ditko is in fine form here...; he seems more sure of himself here, full of verve, dramatic angles and odd hand gestures. In some stories, you can see the groundwork being laid down for what was to come in a few years — there’s a sequence where a guy travels to another dimension where you can see the beginnings of Dr. Strange." – Chris Mautner, Robot 6

Four Color Fear: Forgotten Horror Comics of the 1950s [Pre-Order]

Review: "Each story is weird and wonderful in its own way, even when the writers and artists aren’t as skilled as others. Even better is a 32-page cover gallery in the middle, printed on glossy paper, each suitable for framing. I could stare at such covers all day. [Four Color Fear is an] excellent book..., expertly designed and popping with flaws-and-all color. At more than 300 pages..., [its] heft is welcome. For serious comics scholars or just those seeking a nostalgic kick, [it comes] highly recommended as [a] strong year’s-best contender..." – Rod Lott, Bookgasm

Interview: At The Faster Times, Ryan Joe goes behind the scenes of Four Color Fear with the book's co-editor Greg Sadowski: "The quality of the writing was [the] number one [consideration] — each story had to be a compelling read. The art came second, though I think every story we chose has interesting art."

Destroy All Movies!!!: The Complete Guide to Punks on Film [Pre-Order]

Review: "Consider this a warning. If you fail to immediately purchase a copy of Destroy All Movies a swarm of post-apocalyptic punk rock bikers will kick your door down and ram their fists down your throat. [...] This is an exhaustive reference work that is every bit as brash and entertaining as its subject matter. It's well written, exhaustively researched and laid out in a gorgeous, colorful package that'll make it a coffee table discussion piece in geek homes around the globe." – Todd Brown, Twitch

Interview: Joe Gross of the Austin American-Statesman, who says "Packed with stills from movies both cult and mainstream, filled with reviews of 1,100 films, and featuring interviews with crucial actors and directors, Destroy All Movies is everything one could hope for from a project this esoteric," talks to the book's editors, Zack Carlson and Bryan Connolly, who says: "It's not like a Leonard Maltin guide where you can just go down to the store and be like, 'Oh, I want this movie.' You're gonna really have to fight to find a lot of the stuff in there. Like some of it isn't even available in this country."

Love and Rockets: New Stories #3 [with FREE Signed Bookplate]

Review: "I just sat down and re-read thru the new Love and Rockets issue. Shame on you, True Believer, if you haven’t already dog-eared this one. Please, please order this one today and thank me for urging you to do so. ... Jaime Hernandez has outdone himself. I mean, I’m a cynical super fan at times who often believes he’s 'seen it all' and then something like L ‘n R New Stories #3 comes out and just slays me." – Frank Santoro (who goes on to examine Jaime's panel layouts and compare L&R to Rocky and Bullwinkle), Comics Comics

Interview: At The Daily Cross Hatch, Brian Heater's chat with Jaime Hernandez continues: "Maggie’s just got so much more going on than the other characters, for me. I like doing the other characters, but I’ll always go back to Maggie and the joy of creating her life. There’s just something about the character that I enjoy playing with and finding out where she’s going and who she is."

Birdland [Expanded Edition - Sold Out]

Review: Did you think Sean T. Collins was going to omit Birdland in his "Love and Rocktober" series at Attentiondeficitdisorderly? "Doing a straight-up porn comic that borrows the Palomar-verse characters Fritz and Petra gives Beto the freedom to be as silly and utopian as he wants, something he couldn’t get away with in the naturalist, politically aware world of Palomar and Love and Rockets proper."

You'll Never Know Book 2: Collateral Damage [Pre-Order]

Plug: Corey Blake spotlights Carol Tyler's You'll Never Know books as good examples of comics in print format

Daily OCD: 11/5/10
Written by Mike Baehr | Filed under RIP MDreviewsLove and RocketsJohnny RyanJoe SaccoGilbert HernandezDaily OCD 5 Nov 2010 3:35 PM

Today's Online Commentary & Diversions:

RIP, M.D. [Pre-Order]

Review: "Angry Beavers creator Schauer displays a knowledge and fondness for the old-school culture of monster movies, and the art [in Rip M.D.] has a nice balance between the macabre and the absurd." – Publishers Weekly (link is temporary)

Love and Rockets Library (Palomar Book 3): Beyond Palomar

Review: "...[I]t’s the combination of form and content, style and substance that makes Poison River – the graphic novel-length 'origin of Luba' story that comprises [Beyond Palomar]’s first two-thirds – one of the most singular, potent, unforgettable comics ever made by anyone, ever. ...[I]n a way, [Love and Rockets X] feels like a riff on the same ideas that drive Poison River, simply filtered through the American/urban/musical milieu normally occupied by Jaime. [...] There aren’t very many comics this affecting, that much I can tell you. You can probably count them on two hands with fingers to spare. I would say I envy the people who still get to read this for the first time, but I just re-read it, and here I sit, knocked on my ass." – Sean T. Collins, Attentiondeficitdisorderly

Safe Area Gorazde [Softcover - with FREE Signed Bookplate]

Review: As part of his "Comics of the Decade" series, The Metabunker's Matthias Wivel re-presents his 2000 examination of Joe Sacco's Safe Area Gorazde

Prison Pit: Book 2  [Pre-Order]

Interview: Vice's Nick Gazin talks to Johnny Ryan, prompting answers like "I have no idea. How the fuck would I know? You're a horrible interviewer."

 

Daily OCD: 11/3/10
Written by Mike Baehr | Filed under SupermenMomeLove and RocketsJaime HernandezDaily OCDaudio 3 Nov 2010 3:09 PM

Today's Online Commentary & Diversions:

Mome Vol. 20 - Fall 2010

Review: "So, big shit poppin’ in Mome 20. Good thing it’s also pretty good! ...[W]hat works works really well thanks mostly to bravura cartooning. [...] Here’s to 20 more volumes of this occasionally frustrating, occasionally fascinating, always worth reading series." – Sean T. Collins, Attentiondeficitdisorderly

Supermen! The First Wave of Comic Book Heroes 1936-1941

Review: "Time travel is impossible but a good anthology can sometimes be ordered in such a way that we can get a better sense of how works of art looked to their earliest audience. That’s something Supermen! achieves, so it’s a book I’m holding on to." – Jeet Heer, Comics Comics

Love and Rockets: New Stories #3 [with FREE Signed Bookplate]

Interview: The Daily Cross Hatch's Brian Heater talked to Jaime Hernandez at SPX — from Part 1: "I guess I was pretty good at copying. When I got older, I thought it was bad to copy, because you weren’t a real artist. That’s bull, because I found that when I would copy something, I could draw it for the rest of my life. Let’s say I copied a car or a cart or a certain kind of chair. If I copied it, I could say, 'oh, hey, that turned out pretty good, and, oh hey, I know how to draw it for the next twenty years.'"

Interview (Audio): Mark E. Hayes of the Passing Notes radio show/podcast talks to Jaime Hernandez "about the latest Love and Rockets, comics-to-movies, and Archie. Yes, that Archie."

Daily OCD: 11/2/10
Written by Mike Baehr | Filed under Stephen DeStefanoreviewsLove and RocketsLos Bros HernandezJasonJaime HernandezFour Color FearDaily OCD 2 Nov 2010 4:24 PM

Today's Online Commentary & Diversions:

Lucky in Love Book 1: A Poor Man's History [with FREE Signed Bookplate]

[The following reviews of Lucky in Love Book 1: A Poor Man's History come via artist Stephen DeStefano, who posts the links along with some unpublished Lucky artwork as a nice bonus.]

Review: "Lucky in Love is an oddly charming book. It takes the tradition of immigrant fiction and wartime stories and channels them through archetypal cartooning styles, crafting a book that looks lighthearted but is actually darker in tone and theme than it might appear on the face of it. [...] My rating: 4 of 5 stars." – Jamie S. Rich, Confessions of a Pop Fan

Review: "In stunning black ink on gloriously evocative sepia pages... comes a light-hearted, heavy-hitting barbed-edged faux autobiography that is a moving testament to the life of the average Joe. [...] Drawn in a wild and captivating pastiche of Zoot-Suit era animated styles and frenetically Jitterbugging teen movies; marrying Milt Gross’ He Done Her Wrong and Count Screwloose to Milton Knight’s Hugo and Midnight the Rebel Skunk the bold, broadly Bigfoot cartooning style used imparts a seductive gaiety to the folksy monologue and completely disguises the subtle landmines this tale conceals in the narrative. [...] Lucky in Love is utterly absorbing, purely cartoon entertainment, strictly for adults and immensely enjoyable." – Win Wiacek, Now Read This!

Review: "It was hard to resist when I looked at Chieffet (script) and DeStefano's (artwork) comic book Lucky in Love which came out the other day. DeStefano's drawing is damn inviting in its retro style, and Fantagraphics has succeeded exceptionally well with the design of the book... The only real problem is that DeStefano is such a lively artist, while the story is more dramatic." – Simon Wigzell, Serienytt.se (translated from Swedish)

Review: "Lucky in Love is both a humorous and often naïve look at our past as a country and as sex-obsessed teenagers. It is a deadly serious story about the fantasy and the reality of war and heroism. It’s drawn in a unique style that it reminiscent of classic Disney or Golden Age comic strips and is filled with hopes, dreams, fantasies and often unfortunate realities. It’s a great coming-of-age story and history lesson that shouldn’t be missed. Grade: A-" – Chad Derdowski, Mania

Love and Rockets: New Stories #3 [with FREE Signed Bookplate]

Review: "There's already a lot of reviews out about how amazing Jaime's stories are in this issue [of Love and Rockets: New Stories]. I don't really have anything to add. It's all true. It's very touching, truly a masterpiece. But let me also say how much I love the cover illustration. I keep looking at it — the perfect composition, the colours, the weird, blue sun, the small details (like the baby held by the woman in the background), the boy being separated from the others, not looking at the viewer the way the girls do. It means even more when you've read the story. Jaime has already created a lot of iconic covers, but this might be the best one." – Jason (the cartoonist), Cats Without Dogs

Four Color Fear: Forgotten Horror Comics of the 1950s [Pre-Order]

Review: "That Greg Sadowski has gathered up 40 or so mostly forgotten non-EC Comics is cause for celebration... Sadowski does an excellent job of providing historical information for the talent and studios producing each story here... The book ends up being just about right. Good scholarship to put the stories into context, a glossy gallery in the middle of covers of the horror comics magazines of the day, and a highly entertaining selection of material from some of the better talents of the era. ...[Four Color Fear] is a solid primer and should be an entertaining one for years to come..." – Christopher Allen, Trouble With Comics

Review: "Four Color Fear: Forgotten Horror Comics of the 1950s... will be intoxicating to comics fans, and just a hoot for casual readers. ...[T]his book... contains the crème de la blood from the wacky, unrestrained Halloween party that was pre-code horror comics." – Andrew A. Smith, Scripps Howard News Service

Daily OCD: 11/1/10
Written by Mike Baehr | Filed under reviewsLove and RocketsLos Bros HernandezJasonJaime HernandezJacques TardiGilbert HernandezFour Color FearDrew WeingDaily OCDCarol Tyleraudio 1 Nov 2010 4:38 PM

Today's Online Commentary & Diversions:

The Extraordinary Adventures of Adèle Blanc-Sec Vol. 1: Pterror Over Paris and The Eiffel Tower Demon [Pre-Order]

Review: "I enjoyed Tardi’s art, which made me feel as though I was visiting 1911 Paris. [...] The stories are dense and packed with outrageous events, providing a sense of adventure. The recaps, as characters explain what’s going on to each other, were both a help... and a satire, reinforcing just how much Tardi is playing with the conventions of the genre and layering event upon event, a kitchen-sink approach to plotting that keeps the reader interested in a world that seems so sedate but where anything can happen. [... The Extraordinary Adventures of Adele Blanc-Sec Vol. 1] is fun, but with the knowing remove of self-awareness and satire." – Johanna Draper Carlson, Comics Worth Reading

Review: "Some of the conversations are amusing and the awkward silences of real life relationships are nicely portrayed by silent panels and the characters body language. The eight panel grids are the same on every page but that's not a bad thing. [Werewolves of Montpellier] is not the kind of tale that calls for spectacular graphics." – Eamonn Murphy, SF Crowsnest

Set to Sea

Review: "Set to Sea by Drew Weing... is about 150 pages long, but only has one illustration per page. It is always a good illustration, and this story of a would-be writer who’s shanghaied into being a pirate is great fun. Weing’s art is cartoony, but that helps lessen the violence of ship to ship battles with boarding parties hacking at each other with cutlasses. Weing is a young cartoonist to watch." – Mike Rhode, Washington City Paper

Love and Rockets: New Stories #3 [with FREE Signed Bookplate]

Review: "...[T]he most recent installment in the annual [Love and Rockets] series features a couple of moments that are as technically brilliant and as profoundly moving as anything the series has seen in the past. It’s not easy to get to that level of emotion without collapsing under the weight of your own portentousness, but the Hernandez brothers have managed it." – Bob Temuka, The Tearoom of Despair [Spoiler warning!]

Review: "As soon as I finished reading the new Love and Rockets, I could only think about how much I want to read further. Definitely it will be some time before the next issue and possibly when it is released I'll admit that it is worth waiting every day, but fortunately for the moment I can always go back to previous work by the brothers Hernandez, and read their latest project again and again." – Aristedes Kotsis, Comicdom (translated from Greek)

Love and Rockets Library (Palomar Part 2): Human Diastrophism [with FREE Signed Bookplate]

Review: "I know I just got finished explaining that biology is destiny in the Palomar stories. But what struck me upon rereading the material collected in this volume, dominated by the titular story of a serial killer’s stay in the town, is the power of ideas. Not emotional or sexual drives, even, like the web of lust and unrequited love surround Luba’s mother Maria in the suite of stories that forms the second half of the collection, but actual honest-to-god ideas. [...] If Heartbreak Soup showed us Gilbert the literary comics stylist, Human Diastrophism shows us Gilbert the mindfucker — the Gilbert who’s still with us today." – Sean T. Collins, Attentiondeficitdisorderly (a continuation of the "Love and Rocktober" series)

You'll Never Know Book 2: Collateral Damage [Pre-Order]

Interview (audio): Guest co-host Dan Zettwoch gets in on the Carol Tyler interview action in the new episode of The Comix Claptrap podcast — two of my faves together!

The Portable Frank [with FREE Signed Bookplate]

Commentary: "'Frank in the Ruse Garden,' like all the Frank stories, like most of Jim Woodring’s work, is one hundred percent unadulterated Uncanny. Like Jim Woodring saw fever dreams we’d forgotten ages ago, and put them down on paper to remind us. [...] The Unifactor is an animistic world of spirits and strange forces. Time and again, Frank comes in contact with numinous wonders, and fail to rise to the occasion. Frank comes upon a field of floating souls, and grabs one to use as a flying horse. Frank dives into a well ringed with eyes, and emerges mutated and warped. Frank wanders into the House of the Dead wearing a party hat, and it’s, like, awkward." – Wesley Osam, Super Doomed Planet

Four Color Fear: Forgotten Horror Comics of the 1950s [Pre-Order]

Plug: "How could it be Halloween without some horror comics? I’ve been enjoying Four Color Fear, ed. Greg Sadowski, an anthology of ‘50s horror comics from publishers other than EC. I’m only a couple of stories in and, while none have actually scared me, the oversized, full-color book looks to be a wonderful primer on horror-comics history." – guest columnist Sam Costello, Robot 6

Daily OCD: 10/27-28/10
Written by Mike Baehr | Filed under Stephane BlanquetreviewsMoto HagiomangaLove and RocketsJosh SimmonsJasonGilbert HernandezFour Color FearDrew WeingDestroy All MoviesDavid BDaily OCDBlake BellBill Everett 28 Oct 2010 7:47 PM

Another two-day Online Commentary & Diversions (running a little off schedule, sorry):

Destroy All Movies!!!: The Complete Guide to Punks on Film [Pre-Order]

Review: "Hollywood is probably the most likely to misrepresent any culture, but their casting of punks as Neolithic, abusive, drug addicts with candy-colored hair and an inexplicable amount of chains is far too amusing to turn away from. [Destroy All Movies!!!] editors Zack Carlson and Bryan Connolly seem to have noticed this trend, and their commentary about each of these films borders on hilarious at several points. [...] In the end, you get both a compendium of thoughtful ruminations on punk culture and a hilarious collection of movie missteps..." – Thorin Klosowski, Denver Westword

Review: "[Jason] is without immediate peer, and perhaps the closest I can get to him is Jim Jarmusch, the indie film director... Werewolves of Montpellier is less about the grand sweep of its pseudo-horror set-up (which is utterly demolished by a delicious final page denouement), and more about its mundane aspects, which resonate further than the book's forty-odd pages. ★★★★ [out of 5]" – Michael Leader, Den of Geek

Fire & Water: Bill Everett, the Sub-Mariner and the Birth of Marvel Comics [with FREE Signed Bookplate]

Review: ‎"...Blake Bell has crafted an excellent look at one of comics' most underappreciated creators: compelling, well paced and entertaining. [...] Bell kept Fire & Water moving at an excellent pace, never dwelling too long on any details but giving us Everett's life in relation to his comic career. And that's the key: Bell is a comic fan and knows his audience is as well so that's the focus. [...] While the tale of Everett's life held my attention the art is the real star. Covering everything from early doodles to his last published page we get to see thirty plus years of material. [...] The fit and finish for Fire & Water is exceptional. A heavy matt paper is used that really shows off the material and gives it an almost period feel. The size is perfect for admiring the art and is easy to read; a new perfect package. I can't get enough of the dust jacket image and its design is stunning: a real eye catcher. At $40 it's a great value." – Scott VanderPloeg, Comic Book Daily

A Drunken  Dream and Other Stories [Pre-Order]

Review: At The Hooded Utilitarian, Noah Berlatsky's story-by-story examination of Moto Hagio's A Drunken Dream and Other Stories moves on to "Iguana Girl"

Love and Rockets Library (Palomar Book 1): Heartbreak Soup [with FREE Signed Bookplate]

Review: Sean T. Collins's "Love and Rocktober" review series at Attentiondeficitdisorderly moves on to Gilbert Hernandez's oeuvre, starting with Heartbreak Soup: "Whether in terms of family, sexuality, physicality, or deformity, biology is destiny for the people of Palomar... And although biology is obviously among Beto's primary concerns, destiny is the operative word. I don't think the Palomarians have the ability to escape the way the Locas do. Not all of them need to escape, mind you — there's a lot of really warm and adorable and hilarious and awesome stuff going down in Palomar — but whatever walks alongside them in their lives is gonna walk alongside them till the very end."

House [with FREE Signed Bookplate]

List: At Robot 6, guest contributor Van Jensen names Josh Simmons's House as one of his "six favorite horror comics & movies" (and, by reduction, one of his three favorite horror comics): "Simmons uses no words through the entire story, but his real accomplishment is utilizing the design of the pages to deliver an increasingly claustrophobic, disorienting and terrifying story."

The Littlest Pirate King + Toys in the Basement [Pre-Order]

Plug: At Robot 6, Sean T. Collins highlights our duo of creepy all-ages releases, David B.'s The Littlest Pirate King and Stéphane Blanquet's Toys in the Basement

Set to Sea

Interview: The Daily Cross Hatch's Brian Heater concludes his 3-part chat with Drew Weing: "What’s funny is, I’ve got Google Alerts for my name, so if somebody says it on the Internet, I show up like Beetlejuice. I click on it, like, 'ooh, this guy just dissed me.'" [Hi, Drew.]

Four Color Fear: Forgotten Horror Comics of the 1950s [Pre-Order]

Analysis: At Comics Comics, Timothy Hodler compares the reproduction/restoration style of Four Color Fear: Forgotten Horror Comics of the 1950s with another, similar book which also came out recently, also noting that "Greg Sadowski’s [text] is preferable by a wide margin." (There's plenty of discussion in the comments, and from Alan David Doane at Comic Book Galaxy.)