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Category >> Lucy Knisley

Lucy Knisley's New and Improved Website!
Written by Jen Vaughn | Filed under webcomicsLucy Knisleyart 7 Oct 2014 1:09 PM
Age of license
Fantagraphics' cartoonist Lucy Knisley just unveiled a new website and it is a thang of beauty! It comes to your computer via wifi complete with some quality photos of her comics like *coughcough* An Age of License and some peaks at pages from Displacement from your favorite comics publisher. Really, you need to go see the photos on her site, we can only handle 450 pixels-wide and gosh-darn-it, nice photos of watercolor chips are like artist porn. Still on the fence about her books? Read some original webcomics there or read a short preview on our website. 
 
You can also see examples of her work for hire and commissions, should you yourself want to snag an original drawing or watercolor. Just a word to the wise from Knisley herself, "Just, uh, don't look at it on your mobile platform yet. Ahem. Still working on that part." 
YUMMO 
CHICAGO: Lucy Knisley at Challengers
Written by Jen Vaughn | Filed under Lucy Knisleyevents 25 Sep 2014 11:51 AM

An Age of License
Lucy Knisley is appearing at her first big event since the debut at SDCC! Starting Friday, September 26th at 7pm at Challengers Lucy will be signing and customizing your copy of her newest book from us, An Age of License. This travelogue follows recounts the artist's charming (and romantic!) adventures on a book tour in Europe. The comic store has even gone to the kitchen to whip up some of her sweet and savory treats found in a previous graphic novel, Relish. Challengers was also awarded the 2013 Will Eisner Spirit Award so roam the stacks with ease and feel free to ask the staff any questions, they can fire an answer right back 'atcha!

Get there early before the books sells out or else we highly suspect you'll have to fight crowds, zombies and possible commit a misdemeanor. Glimpse into the future provided by Lucy herself here:

 zombs
Challengers Comics + Conversation
1845 N. Western Ave
Chicago, IL
773.278.0155




Weekly OCD 9.10.14
Written by Sonia Lei | Filed under Will ElderOCDLucy KnisleyJohn SeverinJim WoodringHarvey KurtzmanEleanor DavisEd PiskorDisneyDash ShawChuck ForsmanCarl Barks 9 Sep 2014 1:00 PM

This week's delicious figgy pudding of Online Commentaries and Diversions:

Hip Hop Family Tree Vol. 2: 1981-1983 by Ed Piskor - CoverInterview: Hip Hop Family Tree Vol. 2: by Ed Piskor

"These bite-sized biographies of hip hop’s biggest names and slice-of-life reflections on its defining moments are routinely featured at Boing Boing, but to really experience these beautifully stylized vignettes in all their throwback glory you really need to check out the collected editions." – Geek Dad

Review: "In this volume, you see the evolution from club following to recording industry. Names you recognize are put in a different light—Melle Mel, Kool Herc, Dr. Dre, DJ Yella, Ice T, Run-DMC, Rick Rubin, Russell Simmons." – Ebony

 

Jim by Jim Woodring - CoverReview: Jim by Jim Woodring

"Woodring’s great talent, apart from his beautiful artwork, is his ability to make these absurd and almost nonsensical stories enthralling." – Mark Frauenfelder, BoingBoing

 

An Age of License by Lucy Knisley - CoverReview: An Age of License by Lucy Knisley

"This book is more thought-provoking than her other works, demonstrating growth and a challenge to readers to think about these things in their own lives." – Johanna Draper Carlson, Comics Worth Reading

 

How to Be Happy by Eleanor Davis - CoverReview: How to Be Happy by Eleanor Davis

"…her stories often feature tremendous longing and sadness, but they also lushly suggest what a blessing it is to be alive and in the world. She presents, in short, a more realistic picture of what it means to be a human, with our ever-present mind/body tug-of-war, than almost anyone else out there making art." – Hillary Brown, BoingBoing

 

Bomb Run and Other Stories by Harvey Kurtzman, John Severin, Will Elder et al. - CoverReview: Bomb Run and Other Stories by John Severin, Harvey Kurtzman, Will Elder, et al.

"John Severin was a master at drawing in a very meticulous, detailed and old-school style, with beautiful depth and texture added in Elder’s ink-work. Severin was also known as being a stickler for historical accuracy, something that will be greatly appreciated by modern readers interested in history and historical wargaming." – Mark Frauenfelder, BoingBoing

 

Celebrated Summer by Charles Forsman - CoverReview: Celebrated Summer by Charles Forsman

"Forsman captures the simplicity of youth in Mike and Wolf’s interactions, as they freely flee and are more drawn to boardwalk video games than of the region’s infamous sinful escapes." – Stephanie Trott, Cleaver Magazine

 

New Comics Day 9.3.14
Written by Jen Vaughn | Filed under New Comics DayLucy KnisleyDon Rosa 3 Sep 2014 4:17 PM

This week's comic shop shipment is slated to include the following new titles. Read on to see what comics-blog commentators and web-savvy comic shops are saying about them (more to be added as they appear), check out our previews at the links, and contact your local shop to confirm availability.

An Age of License

An Age of License
by Lucy Knisley

196-page black & white with color 5.5" x 7.5" softcover • $19.99
ISBN: 978-1-60699-768-0

"Like the best travelogues, An Age of License shows you what it would be like to visit a place while reminding you that you can never have the same experience...This book is more thought-provoking than her other works, demonstrating growth and a challenge to readers to think about these things in their own lives." –Johanna Carlson-Draper, Comics Worth Reading

"Knisley is a pleasurable picture-maker and there are hooks here in that she talks in forthright fashion about an affair she had while over there (a forthcoming book is about her marriage, which has to imminent) and she engages directly with the issue of privilege as it pertains to her ability to take trips like this one." –Tom Spurgeon, Comics Reporter

Don Rosa  

Walt Disney's Uncle Scrooge and Donald Duck: The Son of the Sun
by Don Rosa

208-page full color 8.5" x 11" hardcover • $29.99
ISBN: 978-1-60699-742-0

"Rosa's comics may be the best comics ever done in the voice of another creator. They're very funny, satisfying yarns, and this presentation -- particularly the color -- is super-handsome." –Tom Spurgeon, Comics Reporter














Now in Stock: An Age of License by Lucy Knisley
Written by Sonia Lei | Filed under new releasesLucy Knisley 3 Sep 2014 12:30 PM

Just arrived and shipping now from our mail-order department:

An Age of License by Lucy Knisley - Cover

An Age of License
by Lucy Knisley

196-page black & white with color 5.5" x 7.5" softcover • $19.99
ISBN: 978-1-60699-768-0

See Previews / Order Now

Acclaimed cartoonist Lucy Knisley (French Milk, Relish) got an opportunity that most only dream of: a travel-expenses-paid trip to Europe and Scandinavia, thanks to a book tour. An Age of License is Knisley's comics travel memoir recounting her charming (and romantic!) adventures. It’s punctuated by whimsical visual devices (such as a "new experiences" funnel); peppered with the cute cats she meets along the way; and, of course, features her hallmark — drawings and descriptions of food that will make your mouth water. But it’s not all kittens and raclette crêpes: Knisley's experiences are colored by anxieties, introspective self-inquiries, and quotidian revelations — about traveling alone in unfamiliar countries, and about her life and career — that many young adults will relate to. An Age of License — which takes its name from a French saying — is an Eat, Pray, Love for the alternative comics fan.

OCD Extra: Fall Booklist Reviews
Written by Jen Vaughn | Filed under OCDLucy KnisleyJim WoodringEleanor Davis 27 Aug 2014 3:45 PM
The current and next month's issue of Booklist will include reviews of recent releases by Fantagraphics creators, excerpted below:
How to Be Happy
"What's most noticeable when the stories are laid up against one another is her varied visual approach, adapting her style to best fit the material...The success of this collection suggests that short pieces are likely Davis' métier, but what's here is so accomplished that it's natural to hope for a book-length work next time out." –Gordon Flagg
Jim Woodring  
"Woodring launched his comics career in the mid-1980s with Jim, a magazine featuring surreal stories based on his disturbingly bizarre dreams...What these stories also share with the Frank-related comics is Woodring's lush but expressively cartoonish drawing style...Woodring's Frank comics subtly burrow their way into your subconscious, but the Jim stories work a similar magic in an-only slightly-more straightforward and accessible fashion." –Gordon Flagg
An Age of License
by Lucy Knisley
"In her classic travelogue style and interspersed with lovely, contemplative watercolor sketches, she offers glimpses of her journey-feeling...as she observes her life from the distance of travel, and her simple lines, lively illustrations, and patchwork of moments she chooses to include artfully capture her introspective mood. Fans of Knisley's earlier works, particularly older teens or young adults, will appreciate this honest, charming, and gently paced travel journal." –Candice Mack



Weekly OCD 8.19.14
Written by Sonia Lei | Filed under Roberta GregoryOCDMegan Kelsomary fleenerLucy KnisleyJessica AbelEllen ForneyEleanor DavisCarol TylerCarol Swain 19 Aug 2014 11:30 AM

This week's hen's egg clutch of Online Commentaries and Diversions:

Gast by Carol Swain - CoverReview: Gast by Carol Swain

"What’s most impressive about Swain’s story is its quiet nature, and its delicate portrayal of darkness. Instead of going for the obvious and imposing gruesome imagery to match the backdrop of macabre, Swain portrays the setting as a far more subtle place to contain unease, at time bucolic even with the fog of despair that sometimes hangs there." – John Seven, Vermicious

 

How to Be Happy by Eleanor Davis - CoverReview: How to Be Happy by Eleanor Davis

"That's Davis' sensibility. In her roundabout way, she dramatizes not the prospect of happiness, but the promise of it. Her natural territory is found in all the funny and tragic effects of that promise." – Etelka Lehoczky, NPR

Plug: Look who's sitting pretty at number 10 on the NY Times' Best Sellers List this week!

 

Weekly OCD 8.12.14
Written by Sonia Lei | Filed under Roberta GregoryOCDMegan Kelsomary fleenerLucy KnisleyLane MilburnKim ThompsonJoe OrlandoJessica AbelJacques TardiInio AsanoGabrielle BellEsther Pearl WatsonEllen ForneyEleanor DavisDrew FriedmanCarol TylerAl Jaffee 12 Aug 2014 8:30 AM

This week's summery, sun-warmed collection of Online Commentaries and Diversions:

Unloveable Vol. 3 by Esther Pearl WatsonReview: Unlovable Vol. 3 by Esther Pearl Watson

"Though Watson illustrates Tammy’s life in excruciating, embarrassing detail to often-hilarious effect, her clear affection and empathy for her subject shines through. She universalizes Tammy’s experiences, taking us back to relive our own tortured, giddy, deadly serious, horny, boring, and horribly self-conscious teenage years." – Robert Kirby, The Comics Journal

 

Twelve Gems by Lane MilburnReview: Twelve Gems by Lane Milburn

"This is exactly what summer blockbusters should be, only Milburn’s is a singular vision. He exploits clichés by embracing them, and he busily captures hyperspace hilarity, while the black and white pages never feel overwhelmed by the dark backdrops or Milburn’s detailed designs." – Alex Carr, Broken Frontier

 

It Was the War of the Trenches by Jacques TardiReview: It Was the War of the Trenches by Jacques Tardi

"Tardi is unremitting in his focus on the small, human details of the catastrophe—not just the look of uniforms and weaponry, but the way one soldier advances in an awkward, stiff-armed posture, 'protecting my belly with the butt of the rifle,' and the way another makes sculptures and rings from discarded shells, to sell to his comrades." – Gabriel Winslow-Yost, The New York Review of Books

 

How to Be Happy by Eleanor DavisReview: How to Be Happy by Eleanor Davis

"Many of Davis’ stories here explore the way people live with each other and try to find themselves in the modern world. They are funny, surprising, touching, and insightful. Some have a sci-fi slant to them, some are fantasy, and some are just about real people." – Rich Barrett, Mental Floss

 

Judgment Day and Other Stories by Joe Orlando, Al Feldstein, et alReview: Judgment Day and Other Stories by Joe Orlando, Al Feldstein, et al.

"The title story might be the best known in the entire EC comics oeuvre… EC tales often sported morals reinforcing decency and forward-thinking that were decades ahead of their time. 'Judgment Day' is one such story, an O. Henry type of tale about an Earthling astronaut who visits a robot-inhabited planet that is strictly divided along color lines…When the twist ending comes, it carries a surprise even today; sadly, this reflects as much on our own time as the era in which the story was produced." – David Maine, Spectrum Culture

 

Heroes of the Comics: Portraits of the Legends of Comic Books by Drew FriedmanReview: Heroes of the Comics: Portraits of the Legends of Comic Books by Drew Friedman

"I was amazed to find that many of these people were born in the late 1800s and that most of them have military service as part of their illustrious resumes. These weren’t hoity-toity art students born with silver spoons in their mouths; these were hard-working American mutts that, against nearly impossible odds – using only their imaginations, a lot of blood, sweat and tears (and apparently a huge amount of cigarette smoke) – managed to craft a uniquely American artistic medium that would influence countless generations to come." – Bob Leeper, Nerdvana

 

Nijigahara Holograph by Inio AsanoReview: Nijigahara Holograph by Inio Asano

"The story unfolds asynchronously, creating a sense of mystery. Why does the kids’ teacher, Miss Sakaki, have bandages on her face? Why is the class bully so affected by what happened to Arié? Why is the new kid at school, Amahiko, willing to jump out of his classroom’s window? And why are there glowing butterflies everywhere?" – Unshelved

 

  • Plug: Paul Gravett has a feature on French artist Jacques Tardi: "The exhibition and much of Tardi’s work reveals his strong anti-war feeling. It’s an obsession that goes back to his childhood, part of it spent in post-War Germany."
  • Commentary: MTV.com on social issues being discussed and dissected at Comic-Con. Trina Robbins "described the underground comics world being like a boys' club she wasn't invited into. So she and other women made their own comics. 'I produced the very first all-woman comic book in the world, in 1970,' she said. Her new book, 'Pretty in Ink,' is about women cartoonists, and only the latest book by this herstorian of women in comics."
  • Commentary: Several Fantagraphics artists are included in Buzzfeed's "23 Female Cartoonists On Drawing Their Bodies"
Age of License - Video/Photo Slideshow
Written by Sonia Lei | Filed under videopreviewsLucy KnisleyComing Attractions 7 Aug 2014 9:00 AM

An Age of License
by Lucy Knisley

196-page black & white/color 5.5" x 7.5" softcover • $19.99
ISBN: 978-1-60699-768-0

Ships in: September 2014 (subject to change) — Pre-Order Now

Acclaimed cartoonist Lucy Knisley (French Milk, Relish) got an opportunity that most only dream of: a travel-expenses-paid trip to Europe and Scandinavia, thanks to a book tour. An Age of License is Knisley's comics travel memoir recounting her charming (and romantic!) adventures. It’s punctuated by whimsical visual devices (such as a "new experiences" funnel); peppered with the cute cats she meets along the way; and, of course, features her hallmark — drawings and descriptions of food that will make your mouth water. But it’s not all kittens and raclette crêpes: Knisley's experiences are colored by anxieties, introspective self-inquiries, and quotidian revelations — about traveling alone in unfamiliar countries, and about her life and career — that many young adults will relate to. An Age of License — which takes its name from a French saying — is an Eat, Pray, Love for the alternative comics fan.

View Video & Photo Slideshow in New Window



Weekly OCD 8.05.14
Written by Sonia Lei | Filed under OCDLucy KnisleyinterviewsGlenn BrayEleanor DavisDrew FriedmanCCICarol Swain 5 Aug 2014 11:00 AM

This week's summery, sun-warmed collection of Online Commentaries and Diversions:

Gast by Carol SwainReview: Gast by Carol Swain

"Woven through the pages, impressing lightly on Helen’s still child-like mind, are issues such as transgenderism and isolation, appearance and identity, the harsh truths surrounding the commercialisation of nature and the issue of suicide among struggling farmers." – Tom Murphy, Broken Frontier

 

How To Be Happy by Eleanor DavisReview: How To Be Happy by Eleanor Davis

"Davis notes in the book's opening pages that 'this is not a book about how to be happy,' and I agree. How to Be Happy is a book that shows people living with despair, grief, and unhappiness. It is a book about how people fail and sometimes succeed in calming the harsh storm inside ourselves." – Sequential State

Interview: Scout Books profiles Eleanor Davis: "Initially I think I tried to water down my stuff too much, which was a mistake. Now I try to be as much of my own voice as I can get away with. The art directors tell me when it’s too much. What I’ve found is that if I enjoy myself making a piece, people will respond to it. If I’m bored making a piece folks won’t like looking at it either."

 

Heroes of the Comics: Portraits of the Legends of Comic Books by Drew FriedmanReview: Heroes of the Comics: Portraits of the Legends of Comic Books by Drew Friedman

"Friedman is known for adroitly capturing gesture, mood, and psychological nuance in vivid portraits somehow combining elements of caricature and realism…Each of his portraits feels so alive, it is like being welcomed into each artist’s private world." – Steven Heller, The Atlantic

 

The Blighted Eye: Original Comic Art from the Glenn Bray CollectionReview: The Blighted Eye: Original Comic Art from the Glenn Bray Collection by various artists

"I knew that [Glenn Bray] was the first person to seek out and collect the work of the great Donald Duck comic book artist writer Carl Barks back in the 1960s, that he published some small books about grotesque-artist Basil Wolverton, and that he was the champion of forgotten genius Stanislav Szukalski…He was probably the first real comic book art collector, buying original work in an era when everyone else considered it to be worthless." – Mark Frauenfelder, Wink

 

  • Plug: Lucy Knisley's An Age of License made Publishers Weekly's list of Most Anticipated Books of Fall 2014!
  • Commentary: Comic Book Resources recaps Fantagraphics' SDCC Panel, "Fantagraphics Forward": "Groth said that what sets Fantagraphics apart from other comics publishers is the fact that 'almost everything we publish is written and drawn by the same person,' an approach which has contributed to defining the Fantagraphics aesthetic."
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