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Category >> OCD

Weekly OCD 9.17.14
Written by Sonia Lei | Filed under Wandering SonSimon HanselmannShimura TakakoOCDMark FertigEleanor DavisEd PiskorDrew Friedman 17 Sep 2014 12:30 PM

This week's bone-crunchingly, lip-smackingly tasty platter of Online Commentaries and Diversions:

Heroes of the Comics: Portraits of the Legends of Comic Books by Drew Friedman - CoverReview: Heroes of the Comics: Portraits of the Legends of Comic Books by Drew Friedman

"Shirt-sleeves rolled up, bent over drawing boards, puffing on cigarettes, the heroes of the remarkable artist Drew Friedman’s new book aren’t super ones, they’re the (mostly) guys who created Batman, Spider-Man, Plastic Man, and many others." – Ken Tucker, Playboy

Interview: Gil Roth interviews Drew Friedman and Sara Lippmann in his podcast.

 

Hip Hop Family Tree Vol. 2: 1981-1983 by Ed Piskor - Cover Review: Hip Hop Family Tree Vol. 2: 1981-1983 by Ed Piskor

"Every name comes with a face attached, and Piskor’s nimble, deceptively goofy artwork imbues those faces with emotional life — hope, enthusiasm, fuming rage, determination." – Alex Pappademas, Grantland

"Using his compelling artistry — which builds on Mr. Piskor’s love of superhero comic artists as well as famed independent artists like Robert Crumb — he shows us how characters like Fab Five Freddy, a graffiti artist who early on sees the links between hip-hop, break-dancing and graffiti, and helps foster hip-hop’s growth." – Sean D. Hamill, Pittsburgh News

"Combining two decidedly-American art forms: the comic book and hip-hop into one cohesive work seems like a no-brainer. Maybe it just took a cartoonist as passionate and talented as Piskor to pull it off." – Louie Pearlman, REBEAT

Interview: Hillary Brown over at Paste Magazine chats with Ed Piskor.

Interview: Comics Alternative's 100th podcast episode features Hip Hop Family Tree Vol. 2.

Interview: On their podcast, "Tell Me Something I Don't Know," BoingBoing sits down with Ed Piskor and Tom Scioli to talk about being professional comic book artists.

 

Megahex by Simon HanselmannInterview: Megahex by Simon Hanselmann

"Simon Hanselmann is the prolific artist behind the sensational Megg and Mogg. The series has taken off, with much of his work now translated into French and Spanish, and more languages under way." – Sophie Yanow, The Comics Journal

 

Wandering Son Vol. 7 by Shimura TakakoReview: Wandering Son Vol. 7 by Shimura Takako

"The realism and authenticity of the characterization in Wandering Son is one of the manga’s greatest strengths." – Ash Brown, Experiments in Manga

 

Film Noir 101: The 101 Best Film Noir Posters from the 1940s-1950s by Mark FertigReview: Film Noir 101: The 101 Best Film Noir Posters from the 1940s-1950s by Mark Fertig

"Fertig pays appropriate and articulate tribute to these films in his introduction and summarizes the appeal of each one in tightly-written tributes at the back of the book. This would make a great gift for any movie lover." – Leonard Maltin, IndieWire

 

How to Be Happy by Eleanor DavisInterview: How To Be Happy by Eleanor Davis

"In this [podcast] episode, Thien and Rina talk to amazing cartoonist and illustrator, Eleanor Davis about her new book How to Be Happy." – Rina Ayuyang and Thien Pham, Comix Claptrap

 

Weekly OCD 9.10.14
Written by Sonia Lei | Filed under Will ElderOCDLucy KnisleyJohn SeverinJim WoodringHarvey KurtzmanEleanor DavisEd PiskorDisneyDash ShawChuck ForsmanCarl BarksAn Age of License 9 Sep 2014 1:00 PM

This week's delicious figgy pudding of Online Commentaries and Diversions:

Hip Hop Family Tree Vol. 2: 1981-1983 by Ed Piskor - CoverInterview: Hip Hop Family Tree Vol. 2: by Ed Piskor

"These bite-sized biographies of hip hop’s biggest names and slice-of-life reflections on its defining moments are routinely featured at Boing Boing, but to really experience these beautifully stylized vignettes in all their throwback glory you really need to check out the collected editions." – Geek Dad

Review: "In this volume, you see the evolution from club following to recording industry. Names you recognize are put in a different light—Melle Mel, Kool Herc, Dr. Dre, DJ Yella, Ice T, Run-DMC, Rick Rubin, Russell Simmons." – Ebony

 

Jim by Jim Woodring - CoverReview: Jim by Jim Woodring

"Woodring’s great talent, apart from his beautiful artwork, is his ability to make these absurd and almost nonsensical stories enthralling." – Mark Frauenfelder, BoingBoing

 

An Age of License by Lucy Knisley - CoverReview: An Age of License by Lucy Knisley

"This book is more thought-provoking than her other works, demonstrating growth and a challenge to readers to think about these things in their own lives." – Johanna Draper Carlson, Comics Worth Reading

 

How to Be Happy by Eleanor Davis - CoverReview: How to Be Happy by Eleanor Davis

"…her stories often feature tremendous longing and sadness, but they also lushly suggest what a blessing it is to be alive and in the world. She presents, in short, a more realistic picture of what it means to be a human, with our ever-present mind/body tug-of-war, than almost anyone else out there making art." – Hillary Brown, BoingBoing

 

Bomb Run and Other Stories by Harvey Kurtzman, John Severin, Will Elder et al. - CoverReview: Bomb Run and Other Stories by John Severin, Harvey Kurtzman, Will Elder, et al.

"John Severin was a master at drawing in a very meticulous, detailed and old-school style, with beautiful depth and texture added in Elder’s ink-work. Severin was also known as being a stickler for historical accuracy, something that will be greatly appreciated by modern readers interested in history and historical wargaming." – Mark Frauenfelder, BoingBoing

 

Celebrated Summer by Charles Forsman - CoverReview: Celebrated Summer by Charles Forsman

"Forsman captures the simplicity of youth in Mike and Wolf’s interactions, as they freely flee and are more drawn to boardwalk video games than of the region’s infamous sinful escapes." – Stephanie Trott, Cleaver Magazine

 

OCD Extra: Fall Booklist Reviews
Written by Jen Vaughn | Filed under OCDLucy KnisleyJim WoodringEleanor Davis 27 Aug 2014 3:45 PM
The current and next month's issue of Booklist will include reviews of recent releases by Fantagraphics creators, excerpted below:
How to Be Happy
"What's most noticeable when the stories are laid up against one another is her varied visual approach, adapting her style to best fit the material...The success of this collection suggests that short pieces are likely Davis' métier, but what's here is so accomplished that it's natural to hope for a book-length work next time out." –Gordon Flagg
Jim Woodring  
"Woodring launched his comics career in the mid-1980s with Jim, a magazine featuring surreal stories based on his disturbingly bizarre dreams...What these stories also share with the Frank-related comics is Woodring's lush but expressively cartoonish drawing style...Woodring's Frank comics subtly burrow their way into your subconscious, but the Jim stories work a similar magic in an-only slightly-more straightforward and accessible fashion." –Gordon Flagg
An Age of License
by Lucy Knisley
"In her classic travelogue style and interspersed with lovely, contemplative watercolor sketches, she offers glimpses of her journey-feeling...as she observes her life from the distance of travel, and her simple lines, lively illustrations, and patchwork of moments she chooses to include artfully capture her introspective mood. Fans of Knisley's earlier works, particularly older teens or young adults, will appreciate this honest, charming, and gently paced travel journal." –Candice Mack



Weekly OCD 8.19.14
Written by Sonia Lei | Filed under Roberta GregoryOCDMegan Kelsomary fleenerLucy KnisleyJessica AbelEllen ForneyEleanor DavisCarol TylerCarol Swain 19 Aug 2014 11:30 AM

This week's hen's egg clutch of Online Commentaries and Diversions:

Gast by Carol Swain - CoverReview: Gast by Carol Swain

"What’s most impressive about Swain’s story is its quiet nature, and its delicate portrayal of darkness. Instead of going for the obvious and imposing gruesome imagery to match the backdrop of macabre, Swain portrays the setting as a far more subtle place to contain unease, at time bucolic even with the fog of despair that sometimes hangs there." – John Seven, Vermicious

 

How to Be Happy by Eleanor Davis - CoverReview: How to Be Happy by Eleanor Davis

"That's Davis' sensibility. In her roundabout way, she dramatizes not the prospect of happiness, but the promise of it. Her natural territory is found in all the funny and tragic effects of that promise." – Etelka Lehoczky, NPR

Plug: Look who's sitting pretty at number 10 on the NY Times' Best Sellers List this week!

 

Weekly OCD 8.12.14
Written by Sonia Lei | Filed under UNLOVABLERoberta GregoryOCDNijigahara HolographMegan Kelsomary fleenerLucy KnisleyLane MilburnKim ThompsonJoe OrlandoJessica AbelJacques TardiInio AsanoGabrielle BellEsther Pearl WatsonEllen ForneyEleanor DavisDrew FriedmanCarol TylerAl Jaffee 12 Aug 2014 8:30 AM

This week's summery, sun-warmed collection of Online Commentaries and Diversions:

Unloveable Vol. 3 by Esther Pearl WatsonReview: Unlovable Vol. 3 by Esther Pearl Watson

"Though Watson illustrates Tammy’s life in excruciating, embarrassing detail to often-hilarious effect, her clear affection and empathy for her subject shines through. She universalizes Tammy’s experiences, taking us back to relive our own tortured, giddy, deadly serious, horny, boring, and horribly self-conscious teenage years." – Robert Kirby, The Comics Journal

 

Twelve Gems by Lane MilburnReview: Twelve Gems by Lane Milburn

"This is exactly what summer blockbusters should be, only Milburn’s is a singular vision. He exploits clichés by embracing them, and he busily captures hyperspace hilarity, while the black and white pages never feel overwhelmed by the dark backdrops or Milburn’s detailed designs." – Alex Carr, Broken Frontier

 

It Was the War of the Trenches by Jacques TardiReview: It Was the War of the Trenches by Jacques Tardi

"Tardi is unremitting in his focus on the small, human details of the catastrophe—not just the look of uniforms and weaponry, but the way one soldier advances in an awkward, stiff-armed posture, 'protecting my belly with the butt of the rifle,' and the way another makes sculptures and rings from discarded shells, to sell to his comrades." – Gabriel Winslow-Yost, The New York Review of Books

 

How to Be Happy by Eleanor DavisReview: How to Be Happy by Eleanor Davis

"Many of Davis’ stories here explore the way people live with each other and try to find themselves in the modern world. They are funny, surprising, touching, and insightful. Some have a sci-fi slant to them, some are fantasy, and some are just about real people." – Rich Barrett, Mental Floss

 

Judgment Day and Other Stories by Joe Orlando, Al Feldstein, et alReview: Judgment Day and Other Stories by Joe Orlando, Al Feldstein, et al.

"The title story might be the best known in the entire EC comics oeuvre… EC tales often sported morals reinforcing decency and forward-thinking that were decades ahead of their time. 'Judgment Day' is one such story, an O. Henry type of tale about an Earthling astronaut who visits a robot-inhabited planet that is strictly divided along color lines…When the twist ending comes, it carries a surprise even today; sadly, this reflects as much on our own time as the era in which the story was produced." – David Maine, Spectrum Culture

 

Heroes of the Comics: Portraits of the Legends of Comic Books by Drew FriedmanReview: Heroes of the Comics: Portraits of the Legends of Comic Books by Drew Friedman

"I was amazed to find that many of these people were born in the late 1800s and that most of them have military service as part of their illustrious resumes. These weren’t hoity-toity art students born with silver spoons in their mouths; these were hard-working American mutts that, against nearly impossible odds – using only their imaginations, a lot of blood, sweat and tears (and apparently a huge amount of cigarette smoke) – managed to craft a uniquely American artistic medium that would influence countless generations to come." – Bob Leeper, Nerdvana

 

Nijigahara Holograph by Inio AsanoReview: Nijigahara Holograph by Inio Asano

"The story unfolds asynchronously, creating a sense of mystery. Why does the kids’ teacher, Miss Sakaki, have bandages on her face? Why is the class bully so affected by what happened to Arié? Why is the new kid at school, Amahiko, willing to jump out of his classroom’s window? And why are there glowing butterflies everywhere?" – Unshelved

 

  • Plug: Paul Gravett has a feature on French artist Jacques Tardi: "The exhibition and much of Tardi’s work reveals his strong anti-war feeling. It’s an obsession that goes back to his childhood, part of it spent in post-War Germany."
  • Commentary: MTV.com on social issues being discussed and dissected at Comic-Con. Trina Robbins "described the underground comics world being like a boys' club she wasn't invited into. So she and other women made their own comics. 'I produced the very first all-woman comic book in the world, in 1970,' she said. Her new book, 'Pretty in Ink,' is about women cartoonists, and only the latest book by this herstorian of women in comics."
  • Commentary: Several Fantagraphics artists are included in Buzzfeed's "23 Female Cartoonists On Drawing Their Bodies"
Weekly OCD 8.05.14
Written by Sonia Lei | Filed under OCDLucy KnisleyinterviewsGlenn BrayEleanor DavisDrew FriedmanCCICarol SwainAn Age of License 5 Aug 2014 11:00 AM

This week's summery, sun-warmed collection of Online Commentaries and Diversions:

Gast by Carol SwainReview: Gast by Carol Swain

"Woven through the pages, impressing lightly on Helen’s still child-like mind, are issues such as transgenderism and isolation, appearance and identity, the harsh truths surrounding the commercialisation of nature and the issue of suicide among struggling farmers." – Tom Murphy, Broken Frontier

 

How To Be Happy by Eleanor DavisReview: How To Be Happy by Eleanor Davis

"Davis notes in the book's opening pages that 'this is not a book about how to be happy,' and I agree. How to Be Happy is a book that shows people living with despair, grief, and unhappiness. It is a book about how people fail and sometimes succeed in calming the harsh storm inside ourselves." – Sequential State

Interview: Scout Books profiles Eleanor Davis: "Initially I think I tried to water down my stuff too much, which was a mistake. Now I try to be as much of my own voice as I can get away with. The art directors tell me when it’s too much. What I’ve found is that if I enjoy myself making a piece, people will respond to it. If I’m bored making a piece folks won’t like looking at it either."

 

Heroes of the Comics: Portraits of the Legends of Comic Books by Drew FriedmanReview: Heroes of the Comics: Portraits of the Legends of Comic Books by Drew Friedman

"Friedman is known for adroitly capturing gesture, mood, and psychological nuance in vivid portraits somehow combining elements of caricature and realism…Each of his portraits feels so alive, it is like being welcomed into each artist’s private world." – Steven Heller, The Atlantic

 

The Blighted Eye: Original Comic Art from the Glenn Bray CollectionReview: The Blighted Eye: Original Comic Art from the Glenn Bray Collection by various artists

"I knew that [Glenn Bray] was the first person to seek out and collect the work of the great Donald Duck comic book artist writer Carl Barks back in the 1960s, that he published some small books about grotesque-artist Basil Wolverton, and that he was the champion of forgotten genius Stanislav Szukalski…He was probably the first real comic book art collector, buying original work in an era when everyone else considered it to be worthless." – Mark Frauenfelder, Wink

 

  • Plug: Lucy Knisley's An Age of License made Publishers Weekly's list of Most Anticipated Books of Fall 2014!
  • Commentary: Comic Book Resources recaps Fantagraphics' SDCC Panel, "Fantagraphics Forward": "Groth said that what sets Fantagraphics apart from other comics publishers is the fact that 'almost everything we publish is written and drawn by the same person,' an approach which has contributed to defining the Fantagraphics aesthetic."
Weekly OCD 7.28.14
Written by Sonia Lei | Filed under Peter BaggeOCDLucy KnisleyLane MilburnGraham IngelsAn Age of LicenseAl Feldstein 29 Jul 2014 10:15 AM

This week's of Online Commentaries and Diversions:

An Age of License by Lucy KnisleyReview: An Age of License by Lucy Knisley

"…the in-process method of writing and drawing her adventures as they happen gives a vibrant immediacy to situations and sensations. Belying her relatively simple but charming cartooning style, Knisley pages are a cornucopia of information and detail: oversized seagulls, bilingual schoolchildren, and lying sat-navs populate her travels." – Publishers Weekly

 

Twelve Gems by Lane MilburnReview: Twelve Gems by Lane Milburn

"In Twelve Gems, Milburn has created a playful homage to the genre that also incorporates some of the “Marvel-isms” that were injected into the form in the '60s and '70s by Jack Kirby (primarily in The Fantastic Four and Thor) and Jim Starlin (during his stints on Captain Marvel and Warlock). The result is a work that can be enjoyed by a diverse body of comics readers, ranging from old school fans of the form all the way through to newbies who just saw the Guardians of the Galaxy movie." – Bill Boichel, Comics Workbook

 

Sucker Bait and Other Stories (The EC Comics Library)Review: Sucker Bait and Other Stories (The EC Comics Library) by Graham Ingels, Al Feldstein, et al.

"Graham Ingels is the poet laureate of the EC horror comics. His stories are some of the most iconic of the entire line, full of newly revived corpses, horrific villains and some of the scariest moments that have ever been put down on the comics page." – Jason Sacks, Comics Bulletin

 

Buddy Buys a Dump by Peter BaggeReview: Buddy Buys a Dump by Peter Bagge

"Buddy’s life paralleled my own in some sense (crap jobs, weirdo roommates), but essentially I am not, nor will I ever be like Buddy Bradley. I certainly know the type, however, and therein lies the appeal of Buddy as a main character. The revolving cast of nut jobs that Buddy attracts to himself, and is attracted by, doesn’t hurt the appeal or comic potential either, nor does the sharp wit, great dialogue and Bagge’s unique style of rubbery, quavering limbs, popping eyes and massive pie holes shouting and swearing off the pages." – Chris Auman, Sound on Sight

Weekly OCD 7.22.14
Written by Sonia Lei | Filed under Will ElderS Clay WilsonPatrick RosenkranzOCDMoto HagioLane MilburnJohn SeverinJaime HernandezHarvey KurtzmanGilbert HernandezEleanor DavisEd PiskorEC Comics 22 Jul 2014 1:00 PM

This week's pre-Comic-Con warmup of Online Commentaries and Diversions:

How to Be Happy by Eleanor DavisReview: How to Be Happy by Eleanor Davis

"This collection of short stories about people desperately trying to suppress or embrace or just somehow deal with all the difficult emotions careening around in their brain just underscores what those who have seen Davis’ work in scattered anthologies already suspected: that she is a tremendous talent, and one of the smartest voices working in comics today." – Chris Mautner, Robot 6

 

Pirates in the Heartland: The Mythology of S. Clay Wilson Vol. 1 edited by Patrick Rosenkranz - CoverReview: Pirates in the Heartland: The Mythology of S. Clay Wilson edited by Patrick Rosenkranz

"Ultimately, Wilson is a perfect representative of the dark side of the '60s. His work crackles with the viciousness that was the flip side of flower power. If he has any message to convey, it's that the world is falling apart: that (to quote Yeats by way of Joan Didion) 'the center cannot hold.'" – Etelka Lehoczky, NPR

 

Bomb Run and Other Stories (The EC Comics Library)Review: Bomb Run and Other Stories by John Severin, Will Elder, Harvey Kurtzman, et al.

"What's striking about these 34 stories, written by Harvey Kutzman and illustrated with bold, deft confidence by Severin, is their range of tone. Sure, there are the expected heroics of American soldiers fighting in the relatively contemporary war zones of WWII and Korea; there are strong-jawed sergeants, good-natured grunts and daredevil flying aces. But there is also plenty of cowardice, irony, shame and sheer wastefulness–elements that must surely be part of any large-scale conflict, yet are often excised from their comic-book portrayals." – David Maine, Spectrum Culture

 

The Heart of Thomas by Moto HagioReview: The Heart of Thomas by Moto Hagio et al.

"The Heart of Thomas works in several different themes, many revolving around the concept of love. It asks the questions, what does it mean to love or be loved? What will we do to be loved or to help the one we love? Is it okay to accept another’s love? While asking all these questions, Hagio doesn’t put any conditions on them… The feelings are portrayed so genuinely that gender becomes meaningless, and just seeing the characters happy are all that's important in the end." – Lori Henderson, School Library Journal

 

Weekly OCD 7.15.14
Written by Sonia Lei | Filed under Wally WoodSergio PonchioneOCDMichael J VassalloLos Bros HernandezLane MilburnEleanor DavisCharles BurnsBlake Bellawards 15 Jul 2014 11:30 AM

This week's pink cotton candy goodness of Online Commentaries and Diversions:

How to Be Happy by Eleanor DavisReview: How to Be Happy by Eleanor Davis

"A mix of evocative, geometric watercolors and fluid pen-and-ink cartoons, How to Be Happy tells stories of sad people, lonely people, strong people, confident people, all trying to find a tiny bit of happiness in life…Davis’ clever and sometimes jaw-droppingly beautiful artwork makes those stories feel real." – Dan Kois, Slate Book Review

"The use of Adam and Eve’s human bodies to communicate to one another, to seek the bliss that’s coming, to lift that weight, is the image Davis wants us to leave with. No moral, no punchline, no muted epiphany — discarded along with all the other distractions, they leave only Edenic bliss behind." – Sean T. Collins, The Comics Journal

 

Twelve Gems by Lane MilburnReview: Twelve Gems by Lane Milburn et al.

"A valuable gem to add to any collection focusing on independent comics and alternative storytelling with its avant-garde narrative voice, classical art style, and brilliantly paced sense of adventure" – Alger C. Newberry III, Library Journal

 

DKW by Sergio PonchioneReview: DKW by Sergio Ponchione

"It's a lovely piece of work, and a nice introduction to these important cartoonists. You will probably like and appreciate this comic more than I did." – Jason Sacks, Comics Bulletin

 

Witzend by Wallace Wood et al.Review: Witzend by Wallace Wood et al.

"Wood (1927-1981) conceived of witzend as a haven where he and his peers could publish personal work and burst the chains of mainstream comics. Though 'personal,' it must be said, often meant drawing generously endowed women flaunting bared breasts." – Dana Jennings, The New York Times

"It felt like a fan publication, but was produced by professionals. It appeared at the dawn of underground comix, but featured standard genre material, including a (great) Wood jungle hero named "Animan." And, most significantly, it had a philosophy that proved problematic, though intriguing." – Jake Austen, Chicago Tribune

 

The Secret History of Marvel Comics: Jack Kirby and the Moonlighting Artists at Martin Goodman's EmpireCommentary: The Secret History of Marvel Comics by Blake Bell and Dr. Michael J. Vassallo won Favorite Comics-Related Book at the 2014 True Believers Comic Awards, handed out at this year's London Film and Comic Con.

 

Weekly OCD 7.08.14
Written by Sonia Lei | Filed under OCDLove and RocketsLewis TrondheimLane MilburnJaime HernandezEric ReynoldsEleanor DavisEd PiskorEC ComicsDame Darcy 8 Jul 2014 11:00 AM

This week's tasty jubilee of Online Commentaries and Diversions:

Twelve Gems by Lane Milburn - CoverReview: Twelve Gems by Lane Milburn

"This excellent, retro space opera reads like a funny, alternative Infinity Gauntlet meets Guardians of the Galaxy - but way cooler than both." – Benn Ray, Largehearted Boy

"The story — involving a winged genius dog, a pig monster, a sultry space warrior in leather lingerie, a mad scientist, a quest for a dozen mystic rocks and the cyber-future of sex dolls — is dumb, convoluted and perfect! " – Jake Austen, Chicago Tribune

 

How to Be Happy by Eleanor DavisInterview: How to Be Happy by Eleanor Davis

"I tried to lump stories together that felt thematically similar to me — it starts with stories about people searching for utopia, then searching for love, then searching for their best self — wanting to be strong, or to be good…And the last couple stories are about how hard it is to be fully alive – the pain of it, and the bravery of it." – Tim O'Shea, Robot 6

 

The Love Bunglers by Jaime HernandezReview: The Love Bunglers by Jaime Hernandez

"This book represents Jamie's [sic] best work, and is one of the best comics I've ever read…if "The Love Bunglers" is the end, then it is a satisfying conclusion to the Maggie and Hopey stories." – Colleen Frakes, Los Angeles Review of Books

 

Hip Hop Family Tree Vols 1-2 Slipcase by Ed PiskorReview: Hip Hop Family Tree by Ed Piskor

"A superhero-riffing, world-building, toe-tapping, beat-hitting story of a whole lot of people, some brilliant, some lucky, some crazy, and some all of the above. And if you like hip-hop, and nice things, go buy the cased edition because there’s a special secret ‘zine in it about Rob Liefeld and Easy E that is just super fabulous." – Alex de Campi, 12th Dimension

"Even if you are not a fan of Hip Hop or Rap per se, one cannot deny its pervasive influence on the world at large. If nothing else, this first volume covering the years 1975 through 1981, demonstrates the nonstop merging of style and culture that is part and particle of the American experience." – Gregg Reese, Our Weekly

 

Ralph Azham Vol. 1: Why Would You Lie to Someone You Love?Review: Ralph Azham Vol. 1: Why Would You Lie to Someone You Love? by Lewis Trondheim

"It's just so fucking funny and sad at the same time; Trondheim nails the measurements of humour, pathos, drama – all of it, perfectly here." – Zainab Akhtar, Comics & Cola

 

  • Commentary: Paprika Southern features Dame Darcy in an article on her life and work, including her upcoming series, Meat Cake Presents The Voyage of Temptress.
  • Commentary: Over a the SDCC blog, Toucan, Maggie Thompson discusses the history and evolution of books about comic books, with particular emphasis on EC Comics and the historians who've worked to document these artists' lives and work.
  • Commentary: Amongst discussions of consent and policy changes at San Diego Comic-Con, Publishers Weekly discusses the past year at Fantagraphics with associate publisher Eric Reynolds.
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