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Category >> Paul Hornschemeier

Things to See: The Smear from Paul Hornschemeier's Forlorn Funnies #1
Written by Mike Baehr | Filed under Things to seePaul HornschemeierComing Attractions 21 Dec 2011 1:29 PM

The Smear! - Paul Hornschemeier

If I'm not mistaken, this is the first look we've had at a completed page from Paul Hornschemeier's next joint, Forlorn Funnies #1, which is a'comin' sometime next year.

[Follow our Tumblr blog for lots more Things to See every day.]

Daily OCD: 11/23/11
Written by Mike Baehr | Filed under Walt KellyVictor MoscosoSteve DuinShannon WheelerreviewsPaul HornschemeierOil and WaterMomeMichael KuppermanLove and RocketsLos Bros HernandezJaime HernandezinterviewsGilbert HernandezFBI MINIsDaily OCDBest of 2011Alexander Theroux 23 Nov 2011 9:56 PM

Today's Online Commentary & Diversions:

Pogo Vol. 1 Love and Rockets: New Stories #4

List: After appearing on Amazon.com's Best Books of 2011 — Comics and Graphic Novels top 10, Love and Rockets: New Stories #4 and Pogo Vol. 1 show up on Amazon.ca's list of the same name, in the #5 and #4 positions respectively

Plug: At NPR's Monkey See, Glen Weldon recommends Pogo Vol. 1 as a "tryptophan-tastic tome" for your turkey-coma reading enjoyment: "Walt Kelly's seminal, satirical, exquisitely rendered, hugely influential (and, not for nothing, actually funny) comic strip is getting a deluxe treatment by Fantagraphics. Crisply reproduced at a generous size that makes it easier than ever to marvel over Kelly's marvelous linework, this book is everything fans and comics historians were hoping for."

Tales Designed to Thrizzle #7

Review: "...[Tales Designed to] Thrizzle returns to form with lucky number seven — and of all things, it seems like Christopher Nolan’s Inception provided the catalyst.... I’ve described director Christopher Nolan’s movies as what stupid people think smart movies look like; Michael Kupperman’s comics are the opposite, stupid comics made by a smart person for smart people, so perhaps there’s some yin-yang resonance there. Regardless, Kupperman recognized Inception‘s Russian-nesting-doll structure of dreams within dreams within dreams as natural connective tissue for his stream-of-consciousness comedy... It’s nice to hold documentary evidence of Kupperman’s comic genius in my hands again." – Sean T. Collins, The Comics Journal

Oil and Water

Review: "The authors [of Oil and Water] show admirable self-awareness in portraying their semifictional companions (and by implication, themselves) as naive voyeurs whose presence mostly irritates their subjects. 'Lemme get this straight,' says one character. 'They white. We black. They blue. We red. They rich…and I got $53 to buy a week’s worth of groceries. And they gonna tell our stories?' Actually, they do a fine job." – Ruth Brown, Willamette Week

Estonia

Review: "Full of endnotes, translating many phrases he quotes in their original languages, and graced by a few of the couple’s photos and Sarah’s plein air oil paintings, [Estonia: A Ramble Through the Periphery] provides a suitably quirky introduction to Theroux as an essayist and critic.... As the author of two Fantagraphics short studies on Al Capp and Edward Gorey, Theroux’s elliptical style and elongated perspective delineates an American tradition of satire that connects him to Thomas Nast’s political and cultural caricatures of a century and a half ago.... Catch the wit and the venom, the depth and the breadth, of this honest account of 'a strange, unlooked-for place at the back of beyond' where 'the fascination of its strangeness' renders it a fitting subject for a curious report by a memorably talented, ever off-kilter, chronicler of oddity. [Rating] 8/10" – John L. Murphy, PopMatters

FBI•MINIs

Plugs: Our FBI•MINIs have garnered attention from Tom Spurgeon at The Comics Reporter ("I want as many as I can get my hands on"), J.K. Parkin at Robot 6 ("The big chain stores might have cheap TVs this weekend, but how many of them come with a Tony Millionaire mini-comic? Not nearly enough, I tell ya"), Alan Gardner at The Daily Cartoonist ("If you're already planning on picking out some titles for the holidays, might as well get the rare or unpublished work as well"), Paul Constant at The Stranger ("These books are a great idea; a special gift for your special comics fan")

The Girl from HOPPERS

Scene: At The HeroesOnline Blog, read a recap of the Love and Rockets discussion group which we previously spotlighted here

Mome Vol. 17

Interview: "I talked on the phone with Adam Witt of Comics Will Break Your Heart about the early days of the Mome anthology, serializing work, collaboration with other artists, film, and my inability to remember the dates of anything. I apologize in advance for the mumbling bits," says Paul Hornschemeier on his blog

Sex, Rock & Optical Illusions

Analysis: At Robot 6, Matt Seneca examines the sequential imagery in a poster by Victor Moscoso: "The poster Moscoso created for SF-based motion picture company Pablo Ferro Films... is a watershed moment in the artist’s oeuvre, the place where his works in comics and posters unify with perfect elegance. It’s also a fascinating, formally audacious piece of comics, one that breaks rules and innovates furiously without giving up an iota of visual beauty."

Things to See: Carl Barks by Paul Hornschemeier
Written by Mike Baehr | Filed under Things to seePaul HornschemeierCarl Barks 20 Nov 2011 10:24 PM

Carl Barks by Paul Hornschemeier

This sketchbook portrait of Carl Barks by Paul Hornschemeier is the most recent entry on Paul's sketch blog The Daily Forlorn.

[Follow our Tumblr blog for lots more Things to See every day.]

Things to See: 10/3/11 Roundup
Written by Mike Baehr | Filed under Victor KerlowTim LaneTim KreiderThings to seeSteven WeissmanSteve BrodnerStephen DeStefanoSergio PonchioneRichard SalaRenee FrenchRay FenwickPaul KarasikPaul HornschemeierNoah Van SciverNick DrnasoMichael KuppermanMaxLilli CarréLewis TrondheimKevin HuizengaJordan CraneJohnny RyanJim WoodringJim FloraJasonFrank SantoroFantagraphics Bookstorefan artEleanor DavisDave CooperChuck ForsmanBob Fingerman 4 Oct 2011 3:37 AM

Frank caught in the loving tendrils of the sun by Jim Woodring

• Frank "caught in the loving tendrils of the sun" by Jim Woodring; also "Hopelessly outclassed" and "The descent into wealth"

Grotesque - Sergio Ponchione

A Grotesque "family portrait" and Mr. O'Blique postcards that Sergio Ponchione will be giving away to lucky attendees (I think? the autotranslation's a little iffy) at an upcoming festival in Italy

Totem - Jason/Lewis Trondheim

• Ooh, a Jason/Lewis Trondheim exquisite-corpse wraparound cover for a 2004 issue of Belgian comics fanzine Totem; this and film review potpourri at Jason's Cats Without Dogs blog

From Forlorn Funnies no. 1, Huge Suit and The Sea - Paul Hornschemeier

• Sketches and process peeks at Forlorn Funnies #1 at Paul Hornschemeier's The Daily Forlorn

Focus - Kevin Huizenga

Focus book by Kevin Huizenga

http://www.fantagraphics.com/images/flog/mike/201110/art-pope-nyr.jpg

Steve Brodner's portrait of Art Pope for The New Yorker (with process sketches); plus sketches of Lamar Alexander and Chris Christie; all of the above with Steve's commentary

Paul Karasik New Yorker cartoon

• Speaking of The New Yorker, Paul Karasik got a cartoon in there! Congrats Paul! (via Facebook)

Mega-Nerd - Stephen DeStefano

• A whole buncha Stephen DeStefano animation artwork for various projects here, here, here, here, here, here, and here, plus Sea Hag

page from Blammo - Noah Van Sciver

Noah Van Sciver presents a spooky story from the latest issue of Blammo

Richard Sala

Movie night Richard Sala-style (year unknown); also some cozy reading and The 7 Deadly Sins

Tim Lane - St. Louis International Film Festival poster

Tim Lane's poster for the St. Louis International Film Festival (along with its conceptual inspiration)

Great Pumpkin Festival

Steven Weissman and Jordan Crane are putting together an elementary school haunted house for some LUCKY KIDS and here's Steven's flyer for it with Jordan's logo for the school (from Steven via email); also from Steven, his latest "I, Anonymous" spot and Stincker sketchin'

Dave Cooper gig poster

• A fun Dave Cooper gig poster for his friend's band (via Facebook)

http://www.fantagraphics.com/images/flog/mike/201109/forsman-downbylaw.jpg

This comic cover by Chuck Forsman is a fake, but I wish it wasn't

http://www.fantagraphics.com/images/flog/mike/201110/star-trek-retardedness.jpg

A buncha silly Star Trek doodles by Tim Kreider

Ernest

Jim Varney smiles down from heaven on Johnny Ryan

Prison Pit fan art by Sergio Zuniga

Prison Pit fan art by Sergio Zuniga (at Johnny Ryan's blog, along with one previously posted here)

http://www.fantagraphics.com/images/flog/mike/201109/cf-fleury.jpg

Prison Pit fan art by Fréderic Fleury via Twitter

Twain in the Membrane - Dyna Moe

• Mark Twain-via-Michael Kupperman fan art by Dyna Moe (via Facebook, where the artist's profile pic was taken in front of Fantagraphics Bookstore & Gallery)

comic panel by Csaba Mester

• Speaking of Fantagraphics Bookstore and Facebook, here's a panel from a comic in progress by Csaba Mester featuring the former location posted at the latter location

Plus:

• Another Bob Fingerman character design

• Speaking of Facebook yet again, a Victor Kerlow illustration on the subject

Jupiter and Saturn by Frank Santoro

• Many recent illustrations by Max at his El Hombre Duerme, el Fantasma No blog

Recently discovered previously unseen woodblock prints circa 1939 by Jim Flora

Lilli Carré's new looping animated logo for the Eyeworks animation fest is pretty great (tee hee, the "W" is boobs)

A portrait by Nick Drnaso

• A whole ton of stuff from Ray Fenwick's website popped up in my RSS reader and I'm not sure how much of it is new but why not go check it all out anyway

Straw dog on a bed by Renee French

Computer sketches (that is, sketches done on the computer) by Eleanor Davis

Trubble Club is always fun even if we can't tell who drew what

Megan Kelso & Paul Hornschemeier art for Dylan Williams
Written by Mike Baehr | Filed under Paul HornschemeierOriginal ArtMegan Kelsogood deeds 4 Oct 2011 12:49 AM

My Little Piece of Kurt - Megan Kelso

Two more great pieces of artwork up now in the benefit auctions for the family of Dylan Williams & Sparkplug Comic Books: above, Megan Kelso's one-page story about Nirvana, "My Little Piece of Kurt," from 1994 (as recently seen in the Quiet Rrriot exhibit at Fantagraphics Bookstore & Gallery); below, an original page from Paul Hornschemeier's Life with Mr. Dangerous, as seen in Mome Vol. 17. Click each image to go to the respective eBay auctions, and see additional contributions at The Divine Invasion and Profanity Hill.

Life with Mr. Dangerous original art - Paul Hornschemeier

Doodleganza with Paul Hornschemeier Tomorrow!
Written by janice headley | Filed under Paul Hornschemeierevents 3 Oct 2011 9:13 AM

Paul Hornschemeier at Emerald City Comic-Con, 2009
Paul at the Emerald City Comic-Con, 2009 [ credit: Fantagraphics Flickr ]

Hey Chicago! Guess who's hosting this month's Doodleganza: The Drawing Extravaganza at the Museum of Contemporary Art? GIVE UP?

Yes, it's Paul Hornschemeier! Join him tomorrow Tuesday, October 4th from 6:00-8:00 PM as he runs "through the paces of drawing experiments." Will it involve Smurfs? I'm gonna guess, no

Doodleganza is free with museum admission, and is sure to be a blast! The Museum of Contemporary Art is located at 220 East Chicago Avenue. Will Tony Danza be at Doodleganza?  I'm gonna guess... no.

Daily OCD: 9/30/11
Written by Mike Baehr | Filed under reviewsPaul HornschemeierMichael KuppermanJacques TardiinterviewsDaily OCD 1 Oct 2011 1:24 AM

Today's Online Commentary & Diversions:

Mark Twain's Autobiography 1910-2010

Profile: CT.com's Alan Bisbort talks to Michael Kupperman in advance of his appearance at Hartford's Mark Twain House tomorrow: "Kupperman, to be clear and fair, is quite fond of Twain, so his own caricatures are done with the affection one has for an eccentric uncle. His portrayals of Twain are interchangeable with his equally affectionate depictions of Albert Einstein — Twain and Einstein have, in fact, regularly appeared together in Kupperman's comic strips over the years — so he was pleasantly surprised by a recent serendipitous Internet purchase. 'I ordered a Twain wig and mustache from the official Twain website,' he says. 'And the label said "Twain/Einstein" so I must be on the right track.'"

Paul Hornschemeier

Interview: Paul Hornschemeier has a brief chat with MSN Postbox: "I think both my stories’ trajectories and my [philosophy] degree are both symptoms of a central disease. While I tend to gravitate toward comedy and joking around in a social context, I think that I’ve always been pretty introspective when I’m sitting around by myself. Which you tend to do a lot as a cartoonist — as in all of the time."

The Arctic Marauder

Review: "Fantagraphics keeps the hits rolling throughout 2011 and The Arctic Marauder is the latest in their Jacques Tardi translations line.... The art is wonderful. Tardi has this rounded style that is unique and easily identifiable, all at once his signature. The level of detail is astounding, in the background and mechanical details as rendered faux woodcuts. The 9×11.75″ pages present the art in gloriously large detail: be sure to drink in every inch of this black and white work.... At $17 for a sixty-four page oversized hardcover this is a great value: while the vintage prose was lost on me it stands as a great period work with wonderfully detailed art." – eBabble

Paul Hornschemeier's The Daily Forlorn, the book
Written by Mike Baehr | Filed under Paul Hornschemeier 30 Sep 2011 4:05 PM

The Daily Forlorn - Paul Hornschemeier

As if you need another reason to go to the Alternative Press Expo in San Francisco this weekend, publisher Chance Press will be offering The Daily Forlorn, a collection of artwork from Paul Hornschemeier's sketch blog of the same name in a limited-edition and fancy-sounding package. Deets chez Paul.

Daily OCD: 9/29/11
Written by Mike Baehr | Filed under videoRichard SalareviewsPaul HornschemeierMomeMichael KuppermanJesse MoynihaninterviewsGreg SadowskiGahan WilsonFrank SantoroDavid BDaily OCDAlex Toth 29 Sep 2011 7:39 PM

Today's Online Commentary & Diversions:

The Hidden

Review: "Sala creates stories in which brightly colored, cartoony art and characters who speak in casual idiom tell of events that aren’t so much humorous or casual as provocative and scary. In [The Hidden], he combines motifs of a postapocalyptic landscape, wanderers, some vampiric businessmen, and, ultimately, Dr. Frankenstein. The stew works perfectly: readers have no chance to engage in incredulity... Characters are introduced at a steady but manageable pace, and it is only at story’s end that the opening pages become horrifyingly clear. Sala works with a full palette of beautiful, gemlike hues held in generous panels. Even the monsters have individuated faces, which only ramps up the horror." – Francisca Goldsmith, School Library Journal

Interview: Comic Book Resources' Shaun Manning talks to Richard Sala about The Hidden: "It's a story about consequences. It's about what happens when you set wheels in motion that maybe you can't control, that in fact spin completely out of control. What do you do? Do you take responsibility for what comes next or, or do you run away and distance yourself from what you've caused and try to pretend it doesn't matter. And it's about what happens when you finally realize that it's up to you to stop what you started. Is that vague enough?! It's not exactly a 'high concept' description, I'm afraid."

Setting the Standard: Comics by Alex Toth 1952-1954

Review: "A dark horse contender for comics creator of the year can be found in the unlikely personage of the late artist Alex Toth... Setting the Standard aims at... a conceptually sound and compelling [goal]: the publication of Toth's work between 1952 and 1954 for the long-defunct comics publisher Standard... The work is in a variety of sturdy, popular genres. The presentation of the comics themselves proves crisp and strong. The manner in which the increasingly valuable Sadowski and his publisher chose to present the supporting material is even better." – Tom Spurgeon, The Comics Reporter

Mark Twain's Autobiography 1910-2010

Review: "I think the most important thing you need to know about [Mark Twain's Autobiography 1910-2010] is that it made me laugh out loud not once, but close to a dozen times. At one point, during an exchange with a famous cartoon strip writer, I think I laughed for a solid minute. It might have been longer, except the neighbors threatened to shoot me. And if they'd done me in, I'd never have gotten a chance to review this and tell you that this is one of the best books -- if not *the* best book -- I've read all year." – Rob McMonigal, Panel Patter

Nuts

Interview: Comic Book Resources' Alex Dueben chats with Gahan Wilson about Nuts: "On the whole, [the comic] was mostly autobiographical. It just rolled out and it was and continues to be very satisfying to me. It helped me see kids better, too. They're just wonderful. The creativity of children is kind of frightening. They all do these drawings which are just gorgeous and profound, and they'll do poetry. They're brilliant.... I think they're very encouraging because they give you a peek at what we could be if we grew up right. I think there's hope for us all, and kids are evidence of that."

Mome Vol. 22: Fall 2011 - Jesse Moynihan

Interview: At The Comics Journal it's a Mome dude tête-à-tête as Frank Santoro quizzes Jesse Moynihan: "I did some color guides with Photoshop for a piece called Simon Magus (MOME 22). That was helpful but not usually how I do things. Since I’m using a medium that can build layers, it’s not difficult to go back in and edit the color scheme to an extent. For the most part I trust that my eye can decide what needs to happen on the fly."

The Armed Garden and Other Stories

Interview (Audio): On the latest episode of the Panel Borders podcast, Alex Fitch talks to David B. about his new book Black Paths (audio in multiple formats at the link)

Interview (Video): At SPX, Paul Hornschemeier sat down for an on-camera chat with Joe Mochove and Rusty Rowley. "We discuss all of the important topics of the day: Earnest Borgnine, mobility scooters, terrorism, and delicious orange juice," says Paul at his blog. (What is it with the Borgnine?)

What a Great F***ing Duck Indeed
Written by janice headley | Filed under Paul Hornschemeiermerchgood deedsfashion 27 Sep 2011 12:42 PM

Quaxelrod by Paul Hornschemeier

Here's a fine-feathered one for the Fantagraphics Fashion Files: a mustachioed duck tee from Paul Hornschemeier.

Read that again. A mustachioed duck tee.

Apparently, it's a character from somebody else's book. But I don't really care. 'Cause it's a duck. With a mustache. And a portion of the t-shirt sales go to Young Chicago Authors.