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Category >> Peanuts

One-week Sale on Classic Strip Collections
Written by Mike Baehr | Filed under sales specialsRoy CranePrince ValiantPopeyePeanutsNell BrinkleyMort WalkerKrazy KatJerry DumasJack ColeHal FosterGeorge HerrimanEC SegarDennis the MenaceCharles M Schulz 18 Jun 2010 11:30 PM

Dennis the Menace

We're celebrating Father's Day with a one-week-only, first-time-ever sale on our collections of classic comic strips! Save at least 20% on volumes of The Complete Peanuts, Dennis the Menace, Krazy & Ignatz, Popeye, Prince Valiant, and much more, including one-off collections of rarities like Betsy and Me, The Brinkley Girls, Red Barry, Sam's Strip and more. The sale even includes the brand-new Captain Easy Vol. 1! Browse all sale items here. Order online now or by phone Monday-Friday 9 AM - 6 PM at 800-657-1100 (206-524-1967 outside the U.S.). Sale prices not effective at Fantagraphics Bookstore & Gallery. Sale runs through next Friday, June 25, 2010.

Daily OCD: 6/7/10
Written by Mike Baehr | Filed under The Comics JournalRoy CranereviewsPeanutsMegan KelsoKim DeitchJim WoodringJeremy EatonGene DeitchDrew FriedmanDaily OCDCarol TylerBen SchwartzAl Columbia 7 Jun 2010 5:41 PM

Catching up with Online Commentary & Diversions:

Weathercraft

Review: "Over the last few decades, Jim Wood­ring has been drawing a series of wordless, blissfully cruel slapstick fables, set in a world of grotesque entities and psychedelic minarets: half unshakable nightmare, half Chuck Jones cartoon filtered through the Bhagavad Gita. Weathercraft... flows so smoothly and delightfully from each image to the next that it’s easy to ignore that it has its own idea of sense, which may not jibe with anybody else’s." – Douglas Wolk, The New York Times

Review: "For those who find the work involving enough, Weathercraft will resonate with them on some emotional level — there's moments that unnerve, moments that touch — and while it is an immersive experience, the comic, especially in its hardcover form, operates most like a testimony of events. It's a comic, through and through, but it hews closer to a religious tome than it does a Love & Rockets installment." – Tucker Stone, comiXology

Review: "It’s better to experience Woodring’s work than to try and understand it. Weathercraft focuses on Frank’s frequent nemesis Manhog — a representative of humanity at its morally weakest — as he goes through multiple stages of degradation on his way to almost achieving a higher consciousness. The humanoid mongrel Frank hangs around the edges of the story with his loyal pets, but Weathercraft is mainly about how Manhog — and by extension the reader — sees how sick, freaky, and beautiful the world can be… [Grade] A-" – The A.V. Club

Artichoke Tales [Pre-Order]

Review: "Megan Kelso is best known for elegant, small-scale comics... with a historical or memoiristic bent. So it’s surprising and wonderful that Artichoke Tales, her first novel-length work, is the sort of world-­building fantasy story that comes with a family tree and a map on its endpapers. ... Kelso’s ligne claire artwork is consistently sweet and airy, depicting blobby, dot-eyed characters whose body language says as much as their words. The approach provides a likable surface for a story with much darker and stickier depths, about a land whose cultural heritage is rotting away in the aftermath of a civil war." – Douglas Wolk, The New York Times

Dungeon Quest, Book 1  [Pre-Order]

Review: "South African comic book writer/artist Joe Daly’s Dungeon Quest: Book One takes a hilariously askew look at the madness of fantasy quest games. ...[R]eaders with a high tolerance for absurdity and a healthy sense of humor about the subject matter will probably love what's on offer here." – Matt Staggs, Suvudu

Wally Gropius

Review: "Watching [Wally] and his equally gangly, geometric cohorts stretch and sprint and smash their way across Hensley's brighly colored backgrounds and block-lettered sound effects is like reading your favorite poem — or even... Wally Gropius itself — as translated into a language with a totally different alphabet. ... And wonder of wonders, the book finds its own way to be really funny amid all these highfalutin hijinks..." – Sean T. Collins, Attentiondeficitdisorderly

Review: "[Wally Gropius] has quickly become one of my favorite graphic novels. ... The comic is too odd to be described as 'commentary.' It seems far more synthetic than parodic: it blends recognizable influences into something truly new... The plot of Wally Gropius has been described as surreal or random, but it’s coherent and far more complex than I first thought... The book is an encyclopedia of cartoony facial expressions and bodily gestures, and should be studied at the CCS as such. WG radiates a real sense of joy, of 'cartooning unfettered.' ... Hensley is one of the best, and most idiosyncratic, writers of text in comics." – Ken Parille, Blog Flume

Review: "[Daniel] Clowes isn’t as zany as he used to be, so there’s a void to be filled here, and Wally Gropius does that ably: The hardcover collects Hensley’s Gropius stories from the anthology series Mome (with a little extra material thrown in), and his immaculate, vaguely ’50s style owes as much to Mort Walker, Archie Comics, and other vintage teen-humor strips as it does to Clowes. ... [Grade] B" – The A.V. Club

Captain Easy, Soldier of  Fortune: The Complete Sunday Newspaper  Strips Vol. 1 (1933-1935)

Review: "...Captain Easy follows a mysterious agent-for-hire as he travels exotic lands, battling bad guys. ...Crane’s art is stunning, combining simple cartoony figures with richly detailed backgrounds in clever, colorful layouts. It isn’t even necessary to read the dialogue or captions to follow the action; just scan Crane’s dynamic lines, which make every panel look like a unique work of pop art… [Grade] A-" – The A.V. Club

The Best American Comics Criticism

Review: "I was pretty excited when I found out that Fantagraphics was publishing an anthology of The Best American Comics Criticism. ... Editor Ben Schwartz did a great job selecting pieces that comprise a vibrant narrative of the industry. From graphic novels with literary aspirations to comics about capes, the breadth of content in here is really fantastic. ... But of all the essays in the book, only one is written by a woman. That’s a big let down." – Erin Polgreen, Attackerman

Too Soon? - Drew Friedman

Plug: "Drew Friedman is the master American caricaturist of our time. Not only are his portraits of the famous so realistic, they induce double takes, but he also captures truths about personality and draws out (pun intended) the funny in everyone." – Michael Simmons, LA Weekly

The Complete Peanuts 1969-1970 (Vol. 10) [NORTH AMERICA ONLY]

Plug: G4 drops a nice mention of "the ongoing and lovingly assembled Complete Peanuts series" in their review of the Snoopy Flying Ace game for Xbox 360

Pim & Francie: The Golden Bear Days

Interview: Comics Comics' Nicole Rudick sat Al Columbia down for his most candid and revealing interview ever: "So, yeah, I can still draw Pim and Francie. They’re a lot of fun to draw. Almost too much fun. You start to get intoxicated working on them. It’s like, 'This is too much fun. This shouldn’t be allowed. This shouldn’t be legal.' I always put it aside because it just gets me too . . . they’re very intense and fun and maybe fun upsets me."

Jeremy Eaton

Interview: David-Wasting-Paper subjects Jeremy Eaton to his Cartoonist Survey

Gene Deitch

Interview: The Daily Cross Hatch's Brian Heater concludes his conversation with Gene Deitch: "I hate the term '2D.' That’s bullshit. They put us in that category. They say they’re making 3D. They’re not 3D. What Pixar does is not 3D because it’s shaded. The screen is flat. It’s a flat picture. It’s just an illusion."

C. Tyler - photo by Justin Tepe, The News Record

Profile: Taylor Dungjen of University of Cincinnati student newspaper The News Record profiles U of C faculty member C. Tyler: "You might say Tyler is a proud American. You might even call her a patriot. She says she is a liberal hippie chick who supports American troops."

Kim Deitch & Bill Kartalopoulos at Desert Island

Scene: Flickr user Essrog posts a photo and brief report from Kim Deitch 's recent appearance at Desert Island in Brooklyn

It Was the War of the Trenches

Roundtable: The Comics Journal presents parts two and three of their roundtable discussion on comics translation featuring our own multilingualist Kim Thompson

Things to see: 5/28/10
Written by Mike Baehr | Filed under Things to seeSteven WeissmanSteve BrodnerPeanutsNoah Van SciverDebbie DrechslerDash ShawCharles M SchulzBob Fingerman 28 May 2010 2:32 PM

Daily clips & strips -- click for improved/additional viewing at the sources:

Snoopy

• A Snoopy sketch accompanied by a great Sparky anecdote from Greg Hoffman (via The Comics Reporter via Bob Levin)

Hamburger Boy - Bob Fingerman

• More of Bob Fingerman's kid stuff

storyboards - Dash Shaw

Dash Shaw's storyboards for (presumably) a scene from The Ruined Cast

20 dollars - Steven Weissman

• Hey, there's another Post-it Show coming up at GRNY next month, and here's one from Steven Weissman

sketchbook - Steven Weissman

• Also from Steven, more sketchbook

birds - Debbie Drechsler

• I'm partial to Debbie Drechsler's birds

page - Noah Van Sciver

Noah Van Sciver keeps working on his book

beyond pathetic - Steve Brodner

Steve Brodner's take on Sen. James Inhofe (R, Okla.)

Things to see: 5/17/10
Written by Mike Baehr | Filed under Things to seeSteve BrodnerSophie CrumbRenee FrenchPeanutsMark KalesnikoLilli CarréJohnny RyanJim FloraHotwireHans RickheitGabrielle BellCharles M SchulzAnders Nilsen 17 May 2010 4:09 PM

Daily clips & strips — click for improved/additional viewing at the sources:

Fat! by Johnny Ryan

Vice presents personal training, Johnny Ryan style

The Folio Club Two - Onsmith

Hotwire contributor Onsmith contributes ths wraparound cover and interior illustrations to the second issue of the literary zone The Folio Club

The Complete Peanuts covered by Aviv Itzcovitz

• On Covered,  Aviv Itzcovitz takes on The Complete Peanuts Vol. 1

Woody Herman - Jim Flora

• A 1946 Jim Flora rendition of Woody Herman in celebration of Herman's birthday yesterday

Perched - Lilli Carré

Cut-paper art by Lilli Carré

Lucky - Gabrielle Bell

• A new Lucky strip from Gabrielle Bell

Jonah in Green - Mark Kalesniko

• "Jonah in Green," a 1997 portrait by Mark Kalesniko

Wasp No. 04 - Renee French

Wasp No. 04 by Renee French

Sophie Crumb

Sophie Crumb - wedding invitation

4 new postcard-sized drawings by Sophie Crumb, plus her wedding invitation

Arlen Specter - Steve Brodner

• Midterm election color commentary from Steve Brodner

Sleazy Slice 4 centerfold piece - Josh Simmons

Josh Simmons teases his contributions to the new issues of Sleazy Slice and Cinema Sewer

gray shape - Anders Nilsen

Some shapes and a warning from Anders Nilsen

Ectopiary page 24 - Hans Rickheit

Page 24 of Hans Rickheit's Ectopiary

Daily OCD: 5/17/10
Written by Mike Baehr | Filed under Walt KellyRoberta GregoryreviewsPeanutsMiss Lasko-GrossLove and RocketsLos Bros HernandezJoe SaccoJim WoodringJasonHans RickheitDaniel ClowesCharles M SchulzCarol TylerBen SchwartzAlexander TherouxAl ColumbiaAbstract Comics 17 May 2010 4:07 PM

Online Commentary & Diversions:

Ghost World [Softcover Edition]

List: Graphic Novel Reporter's "2010 Core Graphic Novels List" includes Ghost World, Safe Area Gorazde, and You'll Never Know; the "Expanded List" includes Abstract Comics, The Complete Peanuts , I Killed Adolf Hitler, It Was the War of the Trenches, Love and Rockets, Pim and Francie, Pogo, The Squirrel Machine, West Coast Blues, and You Are There

It Was the War of the Trenches

Review: "Many books have been written about World War I, but few can truly worm their way into your head like Jacques Tardi’s It Was the War of the Trenches. … The tales here are devastating and heartbreaking, and often disturbing, but readers will nonetheless have a hard time putting it down." – Holly Scudero, Sacramento Book Review  

The Complete Peanuts 1950-1952 (Vol. 1) [NORTH AMERICA ONLY]

Review: "Perhaps there is something in Charlie Brown, that the longer I read his adventures, the more I become a fatalist. I look at the history of Europe and I know that there are frequent periods of relative peace, such as the past 60 years in Poland. And since they are rare, sooner or later they can suddenly end." – Konrad Hildebrand, Motyw Drogi (translated from Polish)

Love and Rockets Book 06: Duck Feet [Softcover]

Review: "This, then, was my introduction to the idiosyncratic and fantastically imagined worlds of Jaime and Gilbert Hernandez. ... While the stories and art of each Hernandez brother is unique, they shine extra bright by being juxtaposed, one to the other. Altogether: these rambling, lingering tales are bewitching." – Anna Clark, Isak

A Mess of Everything

Review: "...[In A Mess of Everything, Miss] Lasko-Gross covers the usual Holden Caulfield territory with brevity and an eye for detail. Her cartooning is very expressive and the book is coloured in subdued wash-like tones of brown, grey and blue that enhance the emotional impact of her cringe-worthy struggles for independence and individuality." – Bryan Munn, Sequential

Life's a Bitch

Plug: "[Roberta] Gregory is the cartoonist responsible for the comic series Naughty Bits, which is one of the best comic series I've ever read. Seriously, Life's a Bitch is one of my favorite comics ever. It's basically a biography of one normal — albeit kinda hateful — woman, and it's insightful, funny, and true." – Paul Constant, The Stranger (previewing an event on Saturday that, alas, we didn't know about in advance)

Weathercraft

Plug: Ragged Claws Network gives you a heads-up about Weathercraft by Jim Woodring

The Best American Comics Criticism

Contributor notes: Bob Andelman, whose interview with Howard Chaykin about Will Eisner is included in The Best American Comics Criticism, talks about the book

Reviewer: Laura Warholic author Alexander Theroux looks at a new biography of Jack London for The Wall Street Journal: "Readers can be pardoned for thinking it seems not improbable that London, given the chance, would punch Mr. Haley in the nose."

Things to see: 5/14/10
Written by Mike Baehr | Filed under Things to seeRenee FrenchPeanutsCharles M Schulz 14 May 2010 3:13 PM

Daily clips & strips — click for improved/additional viewing at the sources:

unfinished Peanuts art - Charles M. Schulz

• Rare unfinished Peanuts art by Charles M. Schulz (via The Comics Reporter)

rock12sm - Renee French

Another hair-rock thingy from Renee French

Daily OCD: 5/10/10
Written by Mike Baehr | Filed under reviewsPeanutsMomeMichael KuppermanMark KalesnikoLove and RocketsJoe DalyJim WoodringJacques TardiDaily OCDComing AttractionsBen SchwartzBasil Wolverton 10 May 2010 5:23 PM

Online Commentary & Diversions (through yesterday; we're a bit behind):

The Culture Corner

Review: "...[E]ven [Basil Wolverton]'s throwaway work — in this case, half-page gag strips (emphasis on the 'gag') that appeared in Fawcett's Captain Marvel titles during and after World War II — is fully worthy of rediscovery. Like a Bizarro Dr. Seuss, Wolverton packs each Culture Corner with goofy, rhyming advice... While silly and inconsequential, these strips revel in the subversive, surrealist glee that would develop more fully in Wolverton's later output for Mad and others, a style that would help unlock the inner cretin inside everyone from Robert Crumb to Peter Bagge. ...Fantagraphics has to be applauded for tenaciously keeping Wolverton and his eye-gouging, subliminally influential work from slipping through the cracks of comics history. [Grade] B+" — The A.V. Club

It Was the War of the Trenches

Review: "...Tardi’s [It Was the] War of the Trenches is the most powerful comic I’ve read on World War One since Charley’s War... The black and white art is perfectly suited to the era being covered... while Tardi, not for the first time, proves himself a master of expression, the looks on the faces of the men caught up in the war speaking absolute volumes... It’s a hugely powerful work, both moving and horrific and filled with anger for the suffering and injustices one group of ‘civilised’ humans can visit upon another... [A]s the last voices of those who were actually there are fading into silence works like this are needed to remind us of the monstrous acts we can be capable of in service to the beasts of jingoism and nationalism and hubris, that we should read them and take cautionary lessons from them. Never forget." – Joe Gordon, The Forbidden Planet International Blog Log

Dungeon Quest, Book 1  [Pre-Order]

Interview: Avoid the Future has an illuminating talk with Joe Daly: "The environment is surreal, in that it combines the fantastical with the urbane. I try to meld these two sides together into a continuum that supports both the phantasmagoric  and the banal, in a naturalistic kind of way. On a conceptual level, I’m also interested in combining extreme stupidity with a bit of cleverness (which the title ‘Dungeon Quest’ is supposed to invoke)." There's also a glimpse of Dungeon Quest Book 2!

The Best  American Comics Criticism [Pre-Order]

Interview: The Comics Reporter's Tom Spurgeon grills Ben Schwartz, editor of The Best American Comics Criticism, saying "It's the kind of volume that starts fights... but that's okay and it's part of the fun. There's a lot of good work in the book and one or two absolutely inspired choices. Anyone with an interest in comics should at least give it a flip-through, and anyone with an interest in writing about the medium should use it as a springboard to discover a host of excellent new favorites." Schwartz on pitching the book: "Gary was the most skeptical. Early on he asked me if I seriously thought I could fill a whole book with good writing on comics. He sent me his essay 'The Death of Criticism.' Nice to know that's on your publisher's mind!"

Weathercraft

Interview: Canada's National Post has a Q&A with TCAF special guest Jim Woodring: "My name is Jim Woodring and I’m a cartoonist. I’m going to TCAF by invitation, with an assist from Fantagraphics Books, my publisher. I have a new book out called Weathercraft and I’m going to answer questions about it.

Mome Vol. 12 - Fall 2008

Plugs: At The Cool Kids Table, Rickey Purdin runs down some recent acquisitions, including a couple volumes of Mome ("constantly entertaining") and the Weathercraft and Other Unusual Tales free comic ("...this free sample is PROBABLY about to set me on a path of Woodring fanaticism. Well played, Fantagraphics.")

Tales Designed to Thrizzle #6

Plug: "Michael Kupperman's Tales Designed to Thrizzle is that rarest of comic books: It's actually, genuinely a comic experience, with several guaranteed laugh-out-loud moments per issue." – Paul Constant, The Stranger

Freeway - Mark Kalesniko

Plug: Comics Worth Reading's Johanna Draper Carlson spotlights Mark Kalesniko's Freeway in a roundup of upcoming graphic novels

Love and Rockets

Links: Love & Maggie present a "monster-sized" edition of their exhaustive Love and Rockets link roundups

Police blotter: "Man dressed as Snoopy in 'worst attempted jail-break ever'" (via our own Eric Reynolds)

Snoopy license plates in California for a good cause
Written by Mike Baehr | Filed under Peanutsgood deedsCharles M Schulz 5 May 2010 7:43 AM

California license plate - Snoopy

Residents of California will soon be able to have a beagle doing a happy dance on their bumpers. The State of California, United Media, the Charles M. Schulz Museum and the California Association of Museums have teamed up to create this Snoopy license plate, with proceeds going toward supporting California museums. You can get more info, and California drivers can pre-register, at snoopyplate.com.

Daily OCD: 4/30/10
Written by Mike Baehr | Filed under reviewsPeanutsNewaveLewis TrondheimJacques TardiDaniel ClowesDaily OCDCharles M SchulzCarol Tyler 30 Apr 2010 5:11 PM

Online Commentary & Diversions:

The Complete Peanuts 1975-1976 (Vol. 13) [NORTH AMERICA ONLY]

Review: "The latest (13th) volume of Fantagraphics Books The Complete Peanuts: 1975 - 1976 is a delightful visit with that 'round headed kid' and his friends. ... The cartoons Schulz produced in 1975 and 1976 feature more lighthearted and sillier touches than usual; we are even privy to the thoughts of inanimate objects such as the school building and the pitcher’s mound. Some highlights include Charlie Brown meeting his idol, Joe Shlabotnik; sister Sally’s trials in the classroom; Peppermint Patty enrolling in a private school (not knowing it’s a dog obedience school); and the gang’s continuing efforts to play a baseball game. ... Fantagraphics has won numerous awards for this series and they deserve them all for creating such a wonderful archive of this American treasure. This series is a must have for any Peanuts fan and can be enjoyed by the whole family. I wouldn’t miss a volume." – Rich Clabaugh, The Christian Science Monitor

Newave! The Underground Mini Comix of the 1980s

Review: Avoid the Future compiles parts 41-50 of their Twitter mini-reviews of the contents of Newave! The Underground Mini Comix of the 1980s: "Continue on for Krazy Kat tributes, adolescent scarification, penis missiles, comics in the dark and a double helping of Mary Fleener."

You Are There

Review: "Despite a slow start through [You Are There] grows in absurd outcomes of the last chapters, and the script of Forest serves as a humorous critique the excessive attachment to material things of people. Jacques Tardi draws so realistic objects and scenes while portraying the characters so cartoonish and fun. This combination of caricature and realism, though not anything groundbreaking, is executed with great talent by Tardi." – Gustavo Guimarães, Top Comics (forgive the slightly awkward autotranslation)

Harum Scarum: McConey Vol. 1

Plugs: At Robot 6 Chris Mautner takes you to "Comics College" and schools you on the comics oeuvre of the prolific Lewis Trondheim, saying "both Harum Scarum and The Hoodoodad remain supremely entertaining tales featuring McConey, Trondheim's shy, nonplussed, anthropomorphic rabbit and his friends," and saying of The Nimrod "It's a great hodge-podge of some classic Trondheim material... including autobio stories, McConey tales and the great wordless piece, Diablotus (found in issue #2). The back issues are available at dirt cheap prices too."

Justin Green & C. Tyler

Reviewer: Your must-read of the day: Guest writer C. Tyler reviews her husband Justin Green's seminal comic Binky Brown Meets the Holy Virgin Mary for Comic Book Galaxy

Interview: Talking to Allen Brooks at DCist, Daniel Clowes explains the influence of The Complete Peanuts on his new graphic novel Wilson: "So I thought, what if you took that conceit of these kind of daily moments, daily jokes or just kind of emotional moments and put them together in a sequence that actually had a narrative implied. As you say, in-between the strips, that's where the story's told."

Things to see: 4/28/10
Written by Mike Baehr | Filed under Things to seeSteve BrodnerPeanutsPaul HornschemeierNewaveMatthias LehmannLaura ParkJon AdamsJim FloraJaime HernandezFrank SantoroDerek Van GiesonAnders Nilsen 28 Apr 2010 9:52 PM

Daily clips & strips — click for improved/additional viewing at the sources:

The Ghoul Man - Jaime Hernandez

• At What Things Do, the concluding half of Jaime Hernandez's amazing "The Ghoul Man"

Tarot - Michael Dowers

Newave! editor Michael Dowers has been working on a Tarot deck — here's the 6 of Wands, as posted on Facebook

Matthias Lehmann

Matthias Lehmann emerges to reveal some recent illustration and comics work

Cold Heat layout - Frank Santoro

• Looks like Frank Santoro's working out some Cold Heat layouts

Lidsville - Paul Hornschemeier

Paul Hornschemeier Kroffts it up at Covered (and comments on his blog)

Isaac - Anders Nilsen

Anders Nilsen gets biblical on us

Coda - March 1944 - Jim Flora

• "The Rite of Spring" by Jim Flora on the cover of the March 1944 issue of Coda

Snoopy

Mike Sterling catches Snoopy making a grammatical error in The Complete Peanuts 1973-1974

Geek Love - Laura Park

• Two new Geek Love illustrations by Laura Park for Picture Book Report — the other one's even more NSFW than this one

Lloyd Blankfein - Steve Brodner

• Lloyd Blankfein introduces you to his little friend, courtesy of Steve Brodner

Nun - Derek Van Gieson

Derek Van Gieson is busy

Truth Serum - Jon Adams

• This week's Truth Serum by Jon Adams