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Category >> Peanuts

Things to see: 7/8/10
Written by Mike Baehr | Filed under videoTim LaneThings to seeT Edward BakSteve BrodnerRosebud ArchivesRobert GoodinRenee FrenchPeanutsNoah Van SciverMark KalesnikoMarco CoronaLilli CarréKevin HuizengaJosh SimmonsJon AdamsJohnny RyanJohn HankiewiczJim FloraHans RickheitGary PanterFrank SantoroEleanor DavisDrew WeingDerek Van GiesonDebbie DrechslerDash ShawCharles M SchulzAnders Nilsen 7 Jul 2010 11:06 PM

Periodic clips & strips (normal posting schedule returns next week, probably) — click for improved/additional viewing at the sources:

Peanuts promotion

On the Rosebud Archives blog, a rare Peanuts promotional flyer (Rosebud Archives at Fantagraphics)

A video from Dash Shaw... some kind of teaser or something? Even if it's just a joke, it's pretty funny

prints - T. Edward Bak

print - Lilli Carré

print - John Hankiewicz

T. Edward Bak, Lilli Carré and John Hankiewicz (top to bottom) all have pieces in Pony Club Gallery's current print show The Great Outdoors (available for purchase here)

New Earthly Screenprint - Eleanor Davis

• This is one part of a three-piece screenprint by Eleanor Davis for a print show at GRNY

Frank Santoro

• A painting (background?) and collage by Frank Santoro

Fight or Run? - Kevin Huizenga

• From Kevin Huizenga: Burier vs. Exer at Fight or Run

"The doleful sirens are beginning to wail over on the ziggarat. Feeding time."

• Another short story from Gary Panter

Set to Sea - Drew Weing

Drew Weing's Set to Sea, pages 106 & 107

sketch - Marco Corona

• A whole bunch of watercolor portrait sketches by Marco Corona

Belligerent Piano - Tim Lane

• This week's Belligerent Piano by Tim Lane introduces a new character

detail - Jim Flora

• Mid-1950s magazine and record cover details by Jim Flora

Keep Smurf Alive - Johnny Ryan

• New Johnny Ryan art for sale on Comic Art Collective's recent additions page

chickadee - Debbie Drechsler

• New bird sketches by Debbie Drechsler here, here and here

Girl in Orange Stripes - Mark Kalesniko

• "Girl in Orange Stripes" by Mark Kalesniko

Noah Van Sciver Hates All Ghosts

• From Noah Van Sciver, a "homeless comic" and some old Blammo pages

Druid Bunny - Josh Simmons

• From Josh Simmons & Co., numerous Quackers and Randy Gander updates

giant blind worm - Renee French

• From Renee French: bird, dog, iPhone sketch (?), worm, woolyman, bird

Bush - Steve Brodner

• From Steve Brodner, birthday greetings to Calvin Coolidge & George W. Bush, plus Yankee Stadium sketches

things to consider - Anders Nilsen

• A few more things to consider from Anders Nilsen

Ectopiary page 31 - Hans Rickheit

Page 31 of Hans Rickheit's Ectopiary; also, this is NSFW

Fantastic Four - Robert Goodin

Robert Goodin draws the Fantastic Four — more please!

As a father... - Derek Van Gieson

• A bunch of new drawings by Derek Van Gieson

Truth Serum - Jon Adams

• This week's Truth Serum by Jon Adams

First Look: The Complete Peanuts 1977-1978
Written by Mike Baehr | Filed under previewsPeanutsComing AttractionsCharles M Schulz 7 Jul 2010 1:34 PM

The Complete Peanuts 1977-1978 by Charles M. Schulz

The Complete Peanuts 1977-1978 by Charles M. Schulz

Look what arrived on our doorstep today: advance copies of The Complete Peanuts 1977-1978! This new volume will be debuting at Comic-Con and should hit stores in August.

Charles Schulz at Comic-Con, 1974
Written by Mike Baehr | Filed under PeanutsCharles M Schulz 7 Jul 2010 11:06 AM

Charles M. Schulz at San Diego Comic-Con, 1974

A set of photos from the 1974 San Diego Comic-Con at the Comic-Convention Memories blog has been making the rounds. Of particluar interest at the end of this batch: photos of Charles M. Schulz on stage talking and sketching, joined by Peanuts animation director Bill Melendez. Oh, to have been in that audience!

Daily OCD: 7/6/10
Written by Mike Baehr | Filed under Tony MillionaireTim LaneTim HensleyPeter BaggePeanutsJoyce FarmerJim WoodringJasonDave CooperDaily OCDCharles M Schulzaudio 6 Jul 2010 5:19 PM

Online Commentary & Diversions:

Special Exits [October 2010]

Review: "This graphic memoir chronicles the author’s struggle with the aging of her father and stepmother. The subject matter isn’t pretty. Still, [Special Exits] is intriguing, well-written and thought-provoking."  – Nick Smith, ICv2

Billy Hazelnuts and the Crazy Bird

Reviews: The new episode of Easy Rider, the radio show for "rock, punk rock, country, power pop, garage and comics" from Radio PFM out of Arras in northern France, features Billy Hazelnuts and the Crazy Bird by Tony Millionaire, Abandoned Cars by Tim Lane, and Hate Annual #8 by Peter Bagge among their Comics of the Week

Review: "You have to be a real expert in Jason-character physiognomy to even be able to tell that the lonely expat main character in Werewolves of Montpellier is sometimes wearing a werewolf mask. After all, the guy's an anthropomorphized dog at the best of times. In the end, that ends up being the gag. You're not some uniquely unlovable monster, you're just a guy with problems, like anyone else..." – Sean T. Collins, Attentiondeficitdisorderly

The Complete Peanuts 1975-1976 (Vol. 13) [NORTH AMERICA ONLY]

Review: "I have always had a soft spot in my heart for the Peanuts comic strip. I grew up on the old paperback collections and it was always a great day when my mom bought me a new one. Now, thanks to Fantagraphics, the entire run of Peanuts is available to fans in their beautiful, year-by-year collections of Charles Schulz’ masterful and hilarious comic strip. This collection puts us into the years of 1975 - 1976 and includes all of the daily and Sunday strips for the period. ... Thank you Fantagraphics! Grade A" – Tim Janson, Mania

Hate Annual #8

Review: "The most recent issue is probably the strongest [Hate] Annual to date, 36 pages of concentrated hilarity, including the longest Buddy Bradley story in quite some time. Just as impressive are his one-page strips about scientists from Discover Magazine..." – Rob Clough, The Comics Journal

Weathercraft

Analysis: "For the first time, this hapless figure, this half-man, half-animal is a picture of heroism and nobility, his metamorphosis achieved not through cosmic dances or tops but by cruelties inflicted on him by that creature of many masks and tricks, Whim. Earlier in Weathercraft , an infernal creature plucked from the pig-man’s gullet sanctions enlightenment. He who once resembled the demons surrounding the decapitated Ravana becomes whole and fully clothed, now cognizant of his true nature." – Ng Suat Tong, The Hooded Utilitarian

Wally Gropius

Interview: From last Friday, Chris Mautner's revealing conversation with Tim Hensley at Robot 6: "Sometimes it's infuriating to read about a bunch of attractive saccharine pupils in the suburbs. Maybe [Archie] could add a brain damaged character. Maybe Moose, but more likely he never learned to read — have they already done that? Somewhere off-panel there's a convalescent hospital with all the rejects in it. But I wasn't attempting a Dark Knight makeover where everyone has stubble and never prevaricates."

Dave Cooper

Scene: Arrested Motion reports from the opening of Dave Cooper's Mangle exhibit at Jonathan LeVine Gallery, with copious photos

Daily OCD: 7/1/10
Written by Mike Baehr | Filed under videoreviewsPeanutsJasonJacques TardiDaily OCDCharles M SchulzaudioAnders Nilsen 1 Jul 2010 2:52 PM

Online Commentary & Diversions:

Review: "In plot terms, Werewolves of Montpellier is about an art student/thief who dresses up as a werewolf before he goes out to break into people’s homes at night, which a society of actual werewolves is not amused about. What that boils down to on the page, though, are scenes of people sitting next to each other at the laundromat, looking at each other in silence or talking about French actresses while playing chess — and each time, it’s utterly fascinating, and the scene draws you in almost immediately and you don’t want to stop. Jason tells stories with comics in ways that never occur to a lot of people who make comics." – Marc-Oliver Frisch, The Beat

Roundtable: The critics at TIME.com's Techland (Douglas Wolk, Evan Narcisse, Mike Williams and Graeme McMillan) discuss Werewolves of Montpellier: "I pretty much have a love/love relationship with Jason's books. ... It's true that you have to pay attention to catch the details: the fact that Jason draws everyone with animal heads makes it a little bit harder to read some of the characters' interactions. But maybe Jason's central joke is that you have to take extreme measures to create certain kinds of drama when a lot of the time people aren't feeling anything in particular." – Wolk

The Complete Peanuts 1975-1976 (Vol. 13) [NORTH AMERICA ONLY]

Review: "The 13th volume in Fantagraphics' republishing of the complete Peanuts, The Complete Peanuts 1975-1976, could also be subtitled 'The Peanuts of the Absurd.' In the past Schulz had toyed with some absurdist plotlines, e.g. the talking school building. However, between 1975-1976, Schulz took those ideas to a whole new level. ... It's a must for any Peanuts fan or anyone who is a serious fan of comic strips." – Tom Varner, The Real TV Land

It Was the War of the Trenches

Interview: The Comic Geek Speak podcast discusses It Was the War of the Trenches and other Tardi topics with editor/translator Kim Thompson for their Book of the Month Club

Explainers: The Complete Village Voice Strips (1956-66) [2nd   Ed.]

Interview: At Comic Book Resources, Alex Dueben talks to Jules Feiffer: "The point wasn't to make a living, the point was to express myself. I figured, as I say in the book, that given a shot at expressing myself, everything else would fall into place. It turns out I was right about that."

Interview: The latest Royal Jelly Magazine video interview is with Anders Nilsen

Daily OCD: 6/22/10
Written by Mike Baehr | Filed under Tim HensleySignificant ObjectsreviewsPeanutsMegan KelsoJacques TardiGilbert HernandezDaily OCDCharles M Schulz 22 Jun 2010 3:06 PM

Online Commentary & Diversions:

It Was the War of the Trenches

Review: "Yes, [It Was the War of the Trenches] is an unpleasant book (even extending to the art, which does its job as well as everything else in making the war look ugly, muddy, dirty, and bloody; defining each character well but making sure to show the awfulness of their circumstances), but one that everyone should read, not only for a sense of history, but to see the horror of death and the suffering of those forced to partake in it." – Matthew J. Brady, Warren Peace Sings the Blues

Review: "In terms of its writing and its art, [It Was the War of the] Trenches is a masterful work. The stories are elegantly and convincingly told. The images show, at once, deep horror and real beauty — though the one is often so visceral that the other becomes abstract. But the book’s true victory is a moral one. For it shows us, clearly and terribly, the thorough destruction of values inherent in modern war." – Kristian Williams, The Comics Journal

New Tales of Old Palomar #3

Review: "Episodes such as [New Tales of Old Palomar] are the pieces that complete a puzzle, apparently, full of questions and constantly growing. Each answer calls for a new mystery." – Little Nemo's Kat (translated from Spanish)

The Complete Peanuts 1969-1970 (Vol. 10) [NORTH AMERICA ONLY]

Review: "At the end of its second decade, Peanuts was still one of the best things on the comics page, and as likely to be concerned with loss, pain, and depression as it ever was. As others have said many times before, it really is astonishing how one of the best and most popular works in a very popular medium was almost entirely about loss and failure." – Andrew Wheeler, The Antick Musings of G.B.H. Hornswoggler, Gent.

Artichoke Tales [Pre-Order]

Interview: At Comic Book Resources, Alex Dueben talks to Megan Kelso about her new graphic novel Artichoke Tales: "That was just on my mind. That it's a whole subset of comics and storytelling, making up your own world and playing inside of it. I just thought this would be a really fun world to do a whole involved family saga. I planned out the skeleton of the story pretty much right from the beginning. At first, I thought it was going to be a three chapter thing, and then it got more complicated, but always I had this idea of this family and these generations."

Wally Gropius

Interview: Newsarama's J. Caleb Mozzocco talks to Tim Hensley about his new graphic novel Wally Gropius: "Well, it's not like those trapped in derivative mortgages are turning to Carl Barks and Harvey artist Ernie Colon for succor. When I started the story in 2005, I was reacting more to Bush's war money siphon, not predicting the bank collapse/executive bonus siphon we have now. And actually none of the few rich people I know are anything like Wally; they have much different problems as far as I can tell." (At his own blog, Mozzocco adds "if you're wondering, 'Hey Caleb, is this book any good? Should I read it?' Then I would answer, 'Yes, yes that book is very good, and you should totally read it.'")

Significant Objects

Preview: "It's cool to see that those behind the Significant Objects projects are still trying to do more with the concept. The auctions apparently are still going on, but now they're trying something different as well. They're taking those stories and compiling them into a book (scarce). In fact, the story behind the book (infinite) makes the physical book more valuable as well. To make it even more 'valuable,' they've brought on some top artists to illustrate the stories — so even if you read them for free online, there's now more value in buying the physical book to have the physical artwork as well." – Mike Masnick, Techdirt

One-week Sale on Classic Strip Collections
Written by Mike Baehr | Filed under sales specialsRoy CranePrince ValiantPopeyePeanutsNell BrinkleyMort WalkerKrazy KatJerry DumasJack ColeHal FosterGeorge HerrimanEC SegarDennis the MenaceCharles M Schulz 18 Jun 2010 11:30 PM

Dennis the Menace

We're celebrating Father's Day with a one-week-only, first-time-ever sale on our collections of classic comic strips! Save at least 20% on volumes of The Complete Peanuts, Dennis the Menace, Krazy & Ignatz, Popeye, Prince Valiant, and much more, including one-off collections of rarities like Betsy and Me, The Brinkley Girls, Red Barry, Sam's Strip and more. The sale even includes the brand-new Captain Easy Vol. 1! Browse all sale items here. Order online now or by phone Monday-Friday 9 AM - 6 PM at 800-657-1100 (206-524-1967 outside the U.S.). Sale prices not effective at Fantagraphics Bookstore & Gallery. Sale runs through next Friday, June 25, 2010.

Daily OCD: 6/7/10
Written by Mike Baehr | Filed under The Comics JournalRoy CranereviewsPeanutsMegan KelsoKim DeitchJim WoodringJeremy EatonGene DeitchDrew FriedmanDaily OCDCarol TylerBen SchwartzAl Columbia 7 Jun 2010 5:41 PM

Catching up with Online Commentary & Diversions:

Weathercraft

Review: "Over the last few decades, Jim Wood­ring has been drawing a series of wordless, blissfully cruel slapstick fables, set in a world of grotesque entities and psychedelic minarets: half unshakable nightmare, half Chuck Jones cartoon filtered through the Bhagavad Gita. Weathercraft... flows so smoothly and delightfully from each image to the next that it’s easy to ignore that it has its own idea of sense, which may not jibe with anybody else’s." – Douglas Wolk, The New York Times

Review: "For those who find the work involving enough, Weathercraft will resonate with them on some emotional level — there's moments that unnerve, moments that touch — and while it is an immersive experience, the comic, especially in its hardcover form, operates most like a testimony of events. It's a comic, through and through, but it hews closer to a religious tome than it does a Love & Rockets installment." – Tucker Stone, comiXology

Review: "It’s better to experience Woodring’s work than to try and understand it. Weathercraft focuses on Frank’s frequent nemesis Manhog — a representative of humanity at its morally weakest — as he goes through multiple stages of degradation on his way to almost achieving a higher consciousness. The humanoid mongrel Frank hangs around the edges of the story with his loyal pets, but Weathercraft is mainly about how Manhog — and by extension the reader — sees how sick, freaky, and beautiful the world can be… [Grade] A-" – The A.V. Club

Artichoke Tales [Pre-Order]

Review: "Megan Kelso is best known for elegant, small-scale comics... with a historical or memoiristic bent. So it’s surprising and wonderful that Artichoke Tales, her first novel-length work, is the sort of world-­building fantasy story that comes with a family tree and a map on its endpapers. ... Kelso’s ligne claire artwork is consistently sweet and airy, depicting blobby, dot-eyed characters whose body language says as much as their words. The approach provides a likable surface for a story with much darker and stickier depths, about a land whose cultural heritage is rotting away in the aftermath of a civil war." – Douglas Wolk, The New York Times

Dungeon Quest, Book 1  [Pre-Order]

Review: "South African comic book writer/artist Joe Daly’s Dungeon Quest: Book One takes a hilariously askew look at the madness of fantasy quest games. ...[R]eaders with a high tolerance for absurdity and a healthy sense of humor about the subject matter will probably love what's on offer here." – Matt Staggs, Suvudu

Wally Gropius

Review: "Watching [Wally] and his equally gangly, geometric cohorts stretch and sprint and smash their way across Hensley's brighly colored backgrounds and block-lettered sound effects is like reading your favorite poem — or even... Wally Gropius itself — as translated into a language with a totally different alphabet. ... And wonder of wonders, the book finds its own way to be really funny amid all these highfalutin hijinks..." – Sean T. Collins, Attentiondeficitdisorderly

Review: "[Wally Gropius] has quickly become one of my favorite graphic novels. ... The comic is too odd to be described as 'commentary.' It seems far more synthetic than parodic: it blends recognizable influences into something truly new... The plot of Wally Gropius has been described as surreal or random, but it’s coherent and far more complex than I first thought... The book is an encyclopedia of cartoony facial expressions and bodily gestures, and should be studied at the CCS as such. WG radiates a real sense of joy, of 'cartooning unfettered.' ... Hensley is one of the best, and most idiosyncratic, writers of text in comics." – Ken Parille, Blog Flume

Review: "[Daniel] Clowes isn’t as zany as he used to be, so there’s a void to be filled here, and Wally Gropius does that ably: The hardcover collects Hensley’s Gropius stories from the anthology series Mome (with a little extra material thrown in), and his immaculate, vaguely ’50s style owes as much to Mort Walker, Archie Comics, and other vintage teen-humor strips as it does to Clowes. ... [Grade] B" – The A.V. Club

Captain Easy, Soldier of  Fortune: The Complete Sunday Newspaper  Strips Vol. 1 (1933-1935)

Review: "...Captain Easy follows a mysterious agent-for-hire as he travels exotic lands, battling bad guys. ...Crane’s art is stunning, combining simple cartoony figures with richly detailed backgrounds in clever, colorful layouts. It isn’t even necessary to read the dialogue or captions to follow the action; just scan Crane’s dynamic lines, which make every panel look like a unique work of pop art… [Grade] A-" – The A.V. Club

The Best American Comics Criticism

Review: "I was pretty excited when I found out that Fantagraphics was publishing an anthology of The Best American Comics Criticism. ... Editor Ben Schwartz did a great job selecting pieces that comprise a vibrant narrative of the industry. From graphic novels with literary aspirations to comics about capes, the breadth of content in here is really fantastic. ... But of all the essays in the book, only one is written by a woman. That’s a big let down." – Erin Polgreen, Attackerman

Too Soon? - Drew Friedman

Plug: "Drew Friedman is the master American caricaturist of our time. Not only are his portraits of the famous so realistic, they induce double takes, but he also captures truths about personality and draws out (pun intended) the funny in everyone." – Michael Simmons, LA Weekly

The Complete Peanuts 1969-1970 (Vol. 10) [NORTH AMERICA ONLY]

Plug: G4 drops a nice mention of "the ongoing and lovingly assembled Complete Peanuts series" in their review of the Snoopy Flying Ace game for Xbox 360

Pim & Francie: The Golden Bear Days

Interview: Comics Comics' Nicole Rudick sat Al Columbia down for his most candid and revealing interview ever: "So, yeah, I can still draw Pim and Francie. They’re a lot of fun to draw. Almost too much fun. You start to get intoxicated working on them. It’s like, 'This is too much fun. This shouldn’t be allowed. This shouldn’t be legal.' I always put it aside because it just gets me too . . . they’re very intense and fun and maybe fun upsets me."

Jeremy Eaton

Interview: David-Wasting-Paper subjects Jeremy Eaton to his Cartoonist Survey

Gene Deitch

Interview: The Daily Cross Hatch's Brian Heater concludes his conversation with Gene Deitch: "I hate the term '2D.' That’s bullshit. They put us in that category. They say they’re making 3D. They’re not 3D. What Pixar does is not 3D because it’s shaded. The screen is flat. It’s a flat picture. It’s just an illusion."

C. Tyler - photo by Justin Tepe, The News Record

Profile: Taylor Dungjen of University of Cincinnati student newspaper The News Record profiles U of C faculty member C. Tyler: "You might say Tyler is a proud American. You might even call her a patriot. She says she is a liberal hippie chick who supports American troops."

Kim Deitch & Bill Kartalopoulos at Desert Island

Scene: Flickr user Essrog posts a photo and brief report from Kim Deitch 's recent appearance at Desert Island in Brooklyn

It Was the War of the Trenches

Roundtable: The Comics Journal presents parts two and three of their roundtable discussion on comics translation featuring our own multilingualist Kim Thompson

Things to see: 5/28/10
Written by Mike Baehr | Filed under Things to seeSteven WeissmanSteve BrodnerPeanutsNoah Van SciverDebbie DrechslerDash ShawCharles M SchulzBob Fingerman 28 May 2010 2:32 PM

Daily clips & strips -- click for improved/additional viewing at the sources:

Snoopy

• A Snoopy sketch accompanied by a great Sparky anecdote from Greg Hoffman (via The Comics Reporter via Bob Levin)

Hamburger Boy - Bob Fingerman

• More of Bob Fingerman's kid stuff

storyboards - Dash Shaw

Dash Shaw's storyboards for (presumably) a scene from The Ruined Cast

20 dollars - Steven Weissman

• Hey, there's another Post-it Show coming up at GRNY next month, and here's one from Steven Weissman

sketchbook - Steven Weissman

• Also from Steven, more sketchbook

birds - Debbie Drechsler

• I'm partial to Debbie Drechsler's birds

page - Noah Van Sciver

Noah Van Sciver keeps working on his book

beyond pathetic - Steve Brodner

Steve Brodner's take on Sen. James Inhofe (R, Okla.)

Things to see: 5/17/10
Written by Mike Baehr | Filed under Things to seeSteve BrodnerSophie CrumbRenee FrenchPeanutsMark KalesnikoLilli CarréJohnny RyanJim FloraHotwireHans RickheitGabrielle BellCharles M SchulzAnders Nilsen 17 May 2010 4:09 PM

Daily clips & strips — click for improved/additional viewing at the sources:

Fat! by Johnny Ryan

Vice presents personal training, Johnny Ryan style

The Folio Club Two - Onsmith

Hotwire contributor Onsmith contributes ths wraparound cover and interior illustrations to the second issue of the literary zone The Folio Club

The Complete Peanuts covered by Aviv Itzcovitz

• On Covered,  Aviv Itzcovitz takes on The Complete Peanuts Vol. 1

Woody Herman - Jim Flora

• A 1946 Jim Flora rendition of Woody Herman in celebration of Herman's birthday yesterday

Perched - Lilli Carré

Cut-paper art by Lilli Carré

Lucky - Gabrielle Bell

• A new Lucky strip from Gabrielle Bell

Jonah in Green - Mark Kalesniko

• "Jonah in Green," a 1997 portrait by Mark Kalesniko

Wasp No. 04 - Renee French

Wasp No. 04 by Renee French

Sophie Crumb

Sophie Crumb - wedding invitation

4 new postcard-sized drawings by Sophie Crumb, plus her wedding invitation

Arlen Specter - Steve Brodner

• Midterm election color commentary from Steve Brodner

Sleazy Slice 4 centerfold piece - Josh Simmons

Josh Simmons teases his contributions to the new issues of Sleazy Slice and Cinema Sewer

gray shape - Anders Nilsen

Some shapes and a warning from Anders Nilsen

Ectopiary page 24 - Hans Rickheit

Page 24 of Hans Rickheit's Ectopiary