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Category >> Peter Bagge

Can You Imagine? on KEXP and Kickstarter
Written by Mike Baehr | Filed under rockPeter Bagge 4 Dec 2011 10:18 PM

Peter Bagge & his bandmates in Can You Imagine? took to the airwaves on Seattle's KEXP on last night's edition of their punk show Sonic Reducer — if you missed it, you can catch a re-broadcast at 11 PM tonight... that's less than an hour from now! Tune in to 90.3 FM in Seattle or kexp.org worldwide, or if you see this too late, find it in the KEXP streaming audio archive.

And here's another way to get in on the Can You Imagine? fun:

Pete & co. are raising funds via Kickstarter to complete their new album! Pledge now and you could get nifty thank-you gifts like an early download of the album, an original drawing from Pete, your very own cover song played just for you, brunch or a private party with the band, and the ever-intriguing "Surprise Mystery Ball"!

Amazing back-in-the-day pics of the Hernandez Bros. & Peter Bagge
Written by Mike Baehr | Filed under Peter BaggeLove and RocketsJaime HernandezGilbert HernandezFantagraphics history 29 Nov 2011 8:20 PM

Carol Hernandez, Jaime Hernandez, Dave Stevens, Gilbert Hernandez, Matt Groening

Oh, you know, just Jaime and Gilbert Hernandez doing a signing with their pal Matt Groening at Golden Apple Comics in L.A. in 1984 when Dave Stevens stopped by to say hi to them and Gilbert's hotcha gal Carol. ¡Ay carumba! (And is that a turntable under the V poster? Even cooler!) This got posted over at the Love and Rockets/Hernandez Brothers Facebook page way back in March and I've been too flabbergasted for the last 8 months to post it until now.

But lo! Via a Tumblr blog called One-Chair Barbershop comes, unattributed and without context, this vintage photo of Peter Bagge from his NYC street-art stickering days, to pair up and kick the dust off this old Flog draft. Flex those guns, Pete!

Peter Bagge

Things to See: The Real Buddy Bradley Experience
Written by Mike Baehr | Filed under Things to seePeter Bagge 23 Nov 2011 1:50 AM

The Real Buddy Bradley Experience

By luck I just happened to blunder across this recent commission by Peter Bagge featuring all yer favorite classic Hate characters rockin' out! See a real big version here.

[Follow our Tumblr blog for lots more Things to See every day.]

Fantagraphics launches massive mail-order 'FBI•MINI' promo
Written by Kim Thompson | Filed under Tony MillionaireStephen DeStefanoStan Sakaisales specialsRichard SalaRaymond MacherotPopeyePeter BaggeMaurice TillieuxLos Bros HernandezKim DeitchJoost SwarteJohnny RyanJoe SaccoJim WoodringJaime HernandezJacques TardiIvan BrunettiGreg SadowskiGilbert HernandezFBI MINIsErnie BushmillerEC SegarDavid BBill GriffithAlex Toth 22 Nov 2011 1:11 PM

FBI•MINIs
(a partial assortment)

I always was very fond of the mini-comics format -- take two to four 8 1/2 x 11 sheets, fold them once, staple, and voilà! You have an adorable little 5 1/2 x 8 1/2 comic book for mere pennies. But I could never really figure out what to do with this old-school, low-tech format.

Until now!

For this catalog season, we have created 21 "FBI•MINI" booklets (most in this format, although there are a few oddities), as premiums for customers who order books directly from us. They are available free with the purchase of their "matching" book or books -- or for those customers who've already bought those books but are desperate to get the FBI•MINI, free with the purchase of $50 worth of any other Fantagraphics mail-order merchandise.

We've put together some pretty amazing stuff. For instances, there are four foreign FBI•MINIs featuring material that is being released in English for the very first time: an eight-page David B. story from the 1990s, an eight-page full-color Sibyl-Anne story by Raymond Macherot, a twelve-page collection of Joost Swarte's very earliest, most underground-y work -- the stuff that didn't make it into Is That All There Is? -- and most amazing of all, 21 pages of an abandoned Manchette/Tardi story that has only been printed once in an obscure French collection, and never in English. That's 49 page of prime European comics available here for the first time.

There are four sketchbook collections (an amazing gathering of Jim Woodring work preparing for Congress of the Animals, an intricate set of sketches and more by Stephen DeStefano for Lucky in Love, a collection of Kim Deitch's legendary pencilled conceptualization drawings... and a hilarious blurt of Prison Pit character doodles from Johnny Ryan).

There's a non-Segar Popeye strip from the Segar era that didn't make it into our Popeye series (since it wasn't by Segar)... a collection of terrific "coming attractions" pages from Golden Age comics to go with Greg Sadowski's upcoming Golden Age covers collection... a dozen great "Humorama" drawings that didn't quite get into the Humorama book... a striking facsimile of a Maurice Tillieux original Gil Jordan page, complete with watercolored color indications on the back... and a never-before published Joe Sacco strip.

Plus 16 pages of Alex Toth art from the Setting the Standard era, but here reproduced in crisp black and white from the original photostats... Tony Millionaire's hilarious illustrated essay on failing to secure a TV gig for Billy Hazelnuts, complete with a preview of his upcoming Billy Hazelnuts Volume 3... a collection of the legendary Ivan Brunetti Nancy strip try-out... and 12 gorgeous full-color pages of scary Richard Sala faces.

And we've also got some obscurities, such as 12 pages of Bill Griffith comics that got axed from his epochal Lost and Found, a never-before-reprinted Critters-era "Nilson Groundthumper" story by Stan Sakai, and some truly Jurassic-era comics from Peter Bagge and Los Bros. Hernandez.

If any of these catch your interest (and if you're reading this blog surely at least one of them will) you can click right on any of them to a more detailed listing on our website -- or just click right here and all 21 will pop up for you to peruse.

Daily OCD: 11/21/11
Written by Mike Baehr | Filed under Walt KellySteve DuinSpain RodriguezShannon WheelerRich TommasoreviewsPeter BaggePaul NelsonOil and WaterMichael KuppermanMichael J VassalloKevin AveryJoe KubertJacques TardiinterviewsFantagraphics BookstoreDisneyDash ShawDaily OCDCarl BarksBlake BellBill Schelly 21 Nov 2011 11:18 PM

Today's Online Commentary & Diversions:

Walt Disney's Donald Duck: Lost in the Andes

Review: "Barks, the artist, is a master cartoonist, drawing lively, expressive characters with a graceful sense of movement. His beautiful, detailed backgrounds plant the ducks in a fully realized world that adds weight to his storytelling.... But besides the entertaining plots, Barks’ appeal is in his characters. He gives his ducks many human frailties and while they usually try to do the right thing, they make mistakes, get angry, frustrated, and even fail. Fantagraphics Books... does its usual high quality work here as well. The design and layout of the book is a handy comic-book size hardcover with bright, colorful reproductions of the comics. Besides the comics, there are articles on Barks and analysis on each story... For both newcomers to Barks' work and diehard fans, [Walt Disney's Donald Duck: Lost in the Andes] is a book that any comic book reader would love to find under the Christmas tree." – Rich Clabaugh, The Christian Science Monitor

Review (Audio): Owen Craig, co-host of the Panel Culture podcast, looks at Walt Disney's Donald Duck: Lost in the Andes by Carl Barks

Interview: At The Comics Reporter, Tom Spurgeon talks with Rich Tommaso about his coloring work on our Carl Barks Library series — "[Disney] said we didn't have to be so religious about it. They wanted to make sure the color for the ducks, the reds and blues and the yellows, that those were pretty much bang-on. But they agreed that there was a little bit of leeway. If something looked like a bad color choice, you could find something in the ballpark range of that color. So that's what I would do." — and about his own comics work

The Art of Joe Kubert

Review: "All aspects of Kubert's career are touched on in this tome, which is loaded with beautiful colour reproductions of its subject's artwork and complemented by a lengthy and insightful critical commentary by comic book historian Bill Schelly. Over the course of the book's 224 pages, you can see quite clearly how Kubert's art evolved and how his storytelling skills developed, but also how his unique style, those striking touch and sinewy images that could have been rendered by no one else, has remained intact. As with Fantagraphics' previous coffee table comic art books, The Art of Joe Kubert makes you want to see more — all! — of the artist's work." – Miles Fielder, The List

 Everything Is an Afterthought: The Life and Writings of Paul Nelson

Review: "Frank Zappa once said 'most rock journalism is people who can’t write, interviewing people who can’t talk, for people who can’t read.' However true that might be, Paul Nelson was one who most definitely could write. And he interviewed people who could talk, and plenty of people read what he wrote. Kevin Avery certainly read what Nelson wrote, and has now written Everything Is an Afterthought, which is both a biography of Nelson and a collection of his work, including some pieces that have never been published.... Like the best critics, Nelson was primarily a fan of what he wrote about, subjects that struck a chord with him. And here’s a bio and a collection of his work written by a fan of his." – Robert O'Connor, Spike Magazine

Plugs: The Los Angeles Times "Hero Complex Holiday Gift Guide for 2011" includes Walt Disney's Donald Duck: Lost in the Andes by Carl Barks and both volumes of The Extraordinary Adventures of Adèle Blanc-Sec by Jacques Tardi

Pogo Vol. 1

Plug: Proud contributor to our first Walt Kelly Pogo volume Mark Evanier talks up the book on his blog: "It's a wonderful book and though I am a Consulting Editor — I think that's my title — I can rave about it because I deserve very little credit for its wonderfulness. Any book that properly presents the work of Mr. Kelly is going to be, by definition, wonderful...and Carolyn Kelly (daughter of Walt, companion of mine) and Fantagraphics Books made sure it was properly presented."

Mark Twain's Autobiography 1910-2010

Plug: "...Michael Kupperman's new book [Mark Twain's Autobiography 1910-2010]... has everything a boy could want, including Mark Twain on the track of the elusive yeti!... Albert Einstein is a major supporting player in the book (he and Twain open a detective agency, natch) and somehow it behooves me to remind everyone that in real life for really real, Einstein's granddaughter married a renowned bigfoot hunter. That is a fact you can look up on your computer!" – Jack Pendarvis

Peter Bagge signing flyer

Plug: At Seattlest Heather Logue's recommended lit events for the week include Peter Bagge's Black Friday signing at Fantagraphics Bookstore & Gallery

Oil and Water

Interview: Robot 6's Tim O'Shea talks with Shannon Wheeler, with a couple of revealing behind-the-scenes tidbits about Oil and Water in the second half: "Steve [Duin] understands a scene really well. When all the characters visited the bird cleaning facility there was a large storytelling arc with multiple subplots. I would have been afraid to juggle so many elements. I would have focused on the single note of the horror of the facility. Steve isn’t afraid to trust the reader to understand. I’m a lot less trusting of the reader. Steve showed me how to have more faith in the narrative."

Cruisin' with the Hound

Profile: At Babylon Falling Sean Stewart has an image- and quote-packed writeup of his visit with Spain Rodriguez (via Dan N. at TCJ.com)

The Unclothed Man in the 35th Century A.D. [with FREE Signed Bookplate]

Profile: MTV's Liquid Television blog has a nice little writeup on Dash Shaw

The Secret History of Marvel Comics - preliminary cover art

Behind the Scenes: At his blog, Blake Bell gives you another progress update on The Secret History of Marvel Comics, with some fun scans and photos

Spend Black Friday with Peter Bagge in Georgetown!
Written by Larry Reid | Filed under rockPeter BaggeFantagraphics Bookstoreevents 17 Nov 2011 2:21 PM

http://www.fantagraphics.com/images/flog/larry/2011/baggesign2011.jpg

Sensational Seattle counterculture cartoonist Peter Bagge will appear in Georgetown at Fantagraphics Bookstore & Gallery at 7:00 PM on Friday, November 25. The book signing will be followed by a performance of his power pop combo Can You Imagine? featuring Steve Fisk next door at the MIX nightclub.

We've recently seen a deluge of books by earnest young rock journalists chronicling the history of Seattle's grunge movement. But nothing quite matches Peter Bagge's authentic observations during that era. Bagge's work went beyond satire to help shape the attitude and aesthetics of the only significant youth movement to emerge from the Pacific Northwest. His comix still resonate today, as a new generation of readers discover his over-the-top, yet totally accessible approach to cartooning. Bagge will sign copies of his iconic Hate comix anthologies as well as more recent work, including his rockin' all ages romp Yeah! Pick up some perfect personalized gifts for a song.

Bagge's signing will be followed by a musical performance at the Mix with Can You Imagine? This mostly female pop combo is eerily reminiscent of the intergalactic rock group depicted in Yeah! Michelle, Rachel and Sue are joined by Bagge and legendary musician and producer Steve Fisk, combining to form a fairly amazing and unexpected delight.

Fantagraphics Bookstore is located at 1201 S. Vale Street in the heart of Seattle's Georgetown arts community. Open daily 11:30 to 8:00 PM, Sundays until 5:00. Phone 206.658.0110.

Buy from us, save at Americaware (and vice versa)
Written by Mike Baehr | Filed under sales specialsPeter BaggemerchJim WoodringJim BlanchardfashionBasil Wolverton 16 Nov 2011 11:41 AM

Frank by Jim Woodring Hoodie by AmericaWare

We're doing a special cross-promotion with our colleagues at Americaware, producers of fine t-shirts (and now hoodies!) featuring artwork by Northwest comics legends Peter Bagge, Jim Blanchard, Basil Wolverton and Jim Woodring. With every order you make with us you'll get a $5 coupon to use on an Americaware order, and with every Americaware order you'll get a 20% off coupon to use when ordering from us! You could get into an endless loop of savings! I personally have several Americaware shirts and lemme tell ya, they are niiiiice.

Things to See: Connect the Dots with Buddy Bradley
Written by Larry Reid | Filed under Things to seePeter Bagge 11 Oct 2011 10:53 PM

Georgetown Art Attack poster

Help Buddy Bradley stay upright in this interactive poster for the Georgetown Art Attack designed by Tim Silbaugh. Approved by Peter Bagge.

[See our Tumblr blog for more recent Things to See.]

Daily OCD: 10/11/11
Written by Mike Baehr | Filed under Richard SalareviewsPeter BaggeMomeMichael KuppermanMartiLove and RocketsLaura ParkJoe KubertJaime HernandezinterviewsDisneyDerek Van GiesonDaniel ClowesDaily OCDCarl BarksBill Schelly 11 Oct 2011 7:05 PM

Today's Online Commentary & Diversions:

The Cabbie Vol. 1

Review: "Wearing its stylistic debt to Chester Gould’s classic Dick Tracy strips on its sleeve, this Spanish-produced series [The Cabbie] (which was originally printed in the ’80s) revels in a stark and sleazy noir aesthetic that drags the reader on a vicious trip through the scabrous underbelly of 'the Big City.'... An intriguing throwback to the days of heroes with worldviews defined in terms as rigidly black and white as the panels they battled their way through, this visual and thematic love letter to (and simultaneous critique of) Gould’s tropes is highly recommended for grownups with a taste for refreshingly lurid pulp fiction." – Publishers Weekly

The Hidden

Review: "The Hidden feels like a Poe short story, but Richard Sala actually reaches further back into gothic literature for information, filtering Frankenstein through a zombie apocalypse. Just like Poe, the fun here is all in the telling, and Sala’s campfire-ghost-story illustration is blunt enough to be cynically hilarious and cruelly gory, often at the same time. The allegory is the same as from Shelley’s original, but like the best gothic writing, the fun comes from putting the pieces — all the pieces — together at the end." – David Berry, National Post

Interview: Robot 6's Chris Mautner has a brief chat with Richard Sala about a book that's not ours (the Nursery Rhyme Comics anthology from First Second) but any interview with Richard is worthwhile

Mome Vol. 22

Review: "The final edition of Mome leaves a vacuum that thus far has always managed to get filled — let’s hope the graphic world hasn’t lost its taste for short stories just yet — but it will always be a shame to file something this sharply curated in the shelf. The fifth installment of Devil Doll is likely the most beautiful piece here, and there’s a terrific streak of humour throughout — Laura Perk’s Hobbesian, malevolent George is the pitch-black highlight, but there’s plenty of other strains — all adding up to an end that’s perfectly fitting, but no less unfortunate." – David Berry, National Post

The Art of Joe Kubert

Review: "Last month, Fantagraphics released The Art of Joe Kubert, a wonderful oversized art book that traces the career of the comics legend who has worked successfully in all the major 'Ages' of comics. While seeing the art in a larger format is nice, it's the text that winds through the book that opened my eyes to a lot of new things in comics that I had never known before.... Schelly's words opened up a new world of art critique for me.... The Art of Joe Kubert is probably the best DC book I read in September, and DC didn't even publish it. Fantagraphics did, and a wonderful job they did, from the raw materials to the book design and packaging." – Augie DeBlieck Jr., Comic Book Resources

Walt Disney's Donald Duck: Lost in the Andes

Review: "Maybe, perhaps, at last, the time is right for a mass re-evaluation of the Duck comics, as Fantagraphics steps into the breach to produce a definitive library of Carl Barks' oeuvre. Not only do they step in, but they do so fearlessly... The series starts in November with Walt Disney's Donald Duck: Lost in the Andes, an impressively affordable $25 hardcover... Happily, the stories look great and the book is a wonder to hold in your hand.... As to the content, itself, it's just as remarkable an achievement in comics as I remembered.... The contents of the book are as good as they're going to get, produced with an eye towards recapturing as much of the look of the original printings as possible, without sacrificing clarity or design. The quality of the black and white line work is top notch, too.... Pre-order today. Just do it. You can thank me later." – Augie DeBlieck Jr., Comic Book Resources

Mark Twain's Autobiography 1910-2010

Interview: Speaking of short interviews about books that aren't ours, there's a Q&A with Michael Kupperman on the Marvel website about his contribution to their upcoming humor anthology Shame Itself

Love and Rockets: New Stories #4

Commentary: Robot 6's Sean T. Collins points out and comments on Bob Temuka's (spoilery) writeup of the new issue of Love and Rockets: New Stories, saying "it’s as good at conveying the unique nature of the 'Locas' saga, the way its stories shift and grow and can be seen differently over time as we and Jaime and the characters all age and learn more about what happened, as well as any piece I’ve ever read."

Links: Another comprehensive round of Hernandez Bros.-related links from Love & Maggie

Ghost World

Commentary: Robot 6's Sean T. Collins again, spotlighting a choice quote re: Ghost World from CBR's report on Dan Clowes & Adrian Tomine's spotlight panel at APE

Studs Kirby: The Voice of America [Sold Out]

Feature: Kudos to Comics Bulletin for including some off-the-beaten-path choices in their "Top Ten Indie Comics That Should Be Movies" list... Studs Kirby: The Movie we would totally like to see

Daily OCD: 10/3/11
Written by Mike Baehr | Filed under Steve DuinShannon WheelerreviewsPeter BaggeOil and WaterMichael KuppermanLove and RocketsinterviewsGilbert HernandezDrew FriedmanDaily OCD 3 Oct 2011 10:51 PM

Today's Online Commentary & Diversions:

Oil and Water

Review: "Beautifully bound, this is graphic journalism on a human and environmental disaster with long-term consequences far beyond here-and-gone traditional news coverage. Honestly told, well written, beautifully illustrated  and accessible to a wide audience: Oil and Water should reach readers of all ages and satisfy the most discerning critics. BRAVO!" – Craig Seasholes, JacketFlap

Mark Twain's Autobiography 1910-2010

Review: "More a graphic book than straight comic book or straight novel, it plays to the strengths of both mediums. Kupperman’s prose recalls the casual absurdity of early Woody Allen or Douglas Adams, and as there is no real overarching narrative other than Mark Twain’s fictional life, he is able to indulge his every comedic whim, be it a film noir genre parody or a chapter that’s mostly just a list of silly names. The artwork, rendered in black, white and blue, is fabulous as always. The greatest part of his art is how deadpan it is. His simple, clean lines have a retro style that wouldn’t be out of place in a Golden Age comic book or an old magazine advertisement.... Mark Twain’s Autobiography 1910-2010 is a testament to Kupperman’s strengths as both writer and artist." – Brandon Beck, Spandexless

Yeah!

Review: "...Gilbert Hernandez... and... Peter Bagge... design an alternative dimension for alternative music in their graphic novel Yeah!, one that includes the spazzy siren call and pratfalls of teenage girls and the twitchy slapstick of music business screw-ups from other galaxies. ...[T]hese two secret masters of rock fandom and mavericks of cartooning show zest-finesse and feisty satire chronicling the lives lived on the margins of collaborated garage bomp in a series of outrageous stories that could only be true in the music world they’ve personally known..." – Chris Estey, KEXP

Even More Old Jewish Comedians

Interview: Jean-Emmanuel Deluxe of French record label Tricatel talks to Drew Friedman (en Français), and so of course the first topic is Jerry Lewis: "The French understand clearly what so many Americans are unable to grasp, that is to say that Jerry Lewis is an actor AND a brilliant and innovative director. Unfortunately, people will not realize it until long after his death."

Interview: Brian Heater of The Daily Cross Hatch wraps up his chat with Drew Friedman. Oh look, here's a familiar topic: "Jerry Lewis is a very serious guy. When I talk him, he’s very serious. He asks me what I’m doing and how I do this and that, as if he’s taking notes. He’s so interested in what I’m doing. He doesn’t want to talk about himself, which is kind of strange."

Love and Rockets: New Stories #4

Links: Another comprehensive round of Hernandez Bros.-related links from Love & Maggie