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Category >> Popeye

Things to See: 8/8/11 Roundup
Written by Mike Baehr | Filed under Wilfred SantiagoUsagi YojimboTim LaneTim HensleyThings to seeSteven WeissmanSteve BrodnerStephen DeStefanoStan SakaiSophie CrumbSergio PonchioneRichard SalaRenee FrenchPopeyePaul HornschemeierNoah Van SciverNick DrnasoNate NealMatthias LehmannMark KalesnikoLove and RocketsLorenzo MattottiLilli CarréLaura ParkKevin HuizengaJonathan BennettJohnny RyanJohn HankiewiczDrew FriedmanDerek Van GiesonDebbie DrechslerDave CooperDame DarcyAnders Nilsen 9 Aug 2011 2:32 AM

Apologies for the long delay since the last roundup. I enjoy bringing you these posts but lately it's been hard to squeeze them in. I may need to figure out a new approach or something. Anyway, on with the show:

Unemployment - Tim Hensley

• "Unemployment" strips by Tim Hensley

Jonathan Bennett on Nevermind

• Hey, a new comic from Jonathan Bennett! Spin commissioned a 2-page strip from Jonathan as part of their commemoration of the 20th anniversary of Nirvana's Nevermind and posted it on Facebook (Via Spurge)

http://www.fantagraphics.com/images/flog/mike/201108/book%20logo.jpg

Nate Neal has a new website you should bookmark/subscribe to, with lots & lots of updates, including comics in the video "Comix-O-Matic" format, sneak peeks of a new book he's working on and a whole mess more

Nerds pencils - Drew Friedman

Drew Friedman spotlights those awesome "Cool Art Pencils" that Pentech put out in the early '90s

Dental Exam sketch - Dave Cooper

Dave Cooper shares this rough preliminary sketch and a whole mess of reference photos (and behind-the-scenes shenanigans) for a new painting he's working on

Stranger Street - Richard Sala

Richard Salanow on Tumblr! Still some previously unshared updates on his Here Lies Richard Sala blog too

http://www.fantagraphics.com/images/flog/mike/201108/showcase-pamphlet-150.jpg

Tim Lane illustrates the poster & program for the St. Louis Filmmakers Showcase festival

Annency Cinéma Italien

Lorenzo Mattotti also illustrates for a film festival, Annency Cinéma Italien; plus a New Yorker cover and Johnny Rebb

Lilli Carré - Chicago Reader

Lilli Carré illustrates for the Chicago Reader and animates a Wallace Stevens poem at The Hooded Utilitarian

from The Hypo - Noah Van Sciver

• You may have heard we've signed Noah Van Sciver's in-progress graphic novel about Abraham Lincoln, The Hypohere Noah presents an excerpt

Popeye design - Stephen DeStefano

Stephen DeStefano continues to fill up his new Tumblr with Popeye designs, sketches and other stuff

http://www.fantagraphics.com/images/flog/mike/201108/portraitofsschiffel.jpg

The usual amazing stuff from Renee French

Steve Brodner

Steve Brodner on the debt-ceiling debacle for the Washington Post and additional recent sketches at his blog

http://www.fantagraphics.com/images/flog/mike/201108/1000000.jpg

• Yes, it's a panel from Kevin Huizenga's eagerly-awaited Ganges #4

Lefty the Salesman - Paul Hornschemeier

• Four weeks worth of Paul Hornschemeier's daily sketches at The Daily Forlorn

ARTIC FOX

• As we enter the dog days of summer Wilfred Santiago's arctic fox is looking mighty cool

Osamamel

Johnny Ryan gets in the Smurf spirit (Seal Team Smurf? Smurf Team Six? Smurf Team Smurf?) and draws his favorite bullies

Stan Sakai - sketchbook back cover

• Yowie, this back cover to Stan Sakai's latest annual sketchbook — yowie!

And more Things to See since the last update:

Glimpses of a new comic from Matthias Lehmann

Steven Weissman's latest "I, Anonymous" spots and more at his Chewing Gum in Church blog

A figure painting from a life drawing class by John Hankiewicz

Dame Darcy's developed a propinquity for dolphins

Debbie Drechsler returns to her nature-sketching blog Just Around the Corner

• Sketches by Mark Kalesniko for his new graphic novel Freeway at his blog

Sergio Ponchione gives some glimpses of his summer projects (if I'm interpreting the autotranslation correctly)

Here's the blog of new Mome contributor Nick Drnaso

Recent sketches (and aquarium videos) by Laura Park

New drawings from Sophie Crumb

Anders Nilsen 's book tour travel sketches

Lots of updates on recent projects and an autobio-ish strip or two from Derek Van Gieson

• Anthony Vukojevich takes on Love and Rockets #1 at the Covered blog

Meet Ian Burns
Written by Mike Baehr | Filed under staffPopeyeJim BlanchardEC Segar 5 Aug 2011 8:19 PM

Dame Darcy's Meat Cake exhibit & signing at Fantagraphics Bookstore & Gallery, July 10, 2010
Ian Burns has his fortune told by Dame Darcy, July 10, 2010

Ian Burns is the second-most recent staff acquisition here at Fantagraphics (designer Tony Ong holds current "new guy" status) — you may know him as one of the voices who answers our phone and takes your orders, or as the friendly bearded fellow at our Emerald City Comicon booth this year, or perhaps you've read his "Diaflogue" interviews with Leslie Stein and Kim Deitch. If the latter, you know that Ian is a pretty thoughtful guy about comics, and I'm happy to learn that he's been contributing essays to Graphic Eye, the recently-launched comics reviews-and-interviews site headed up by our erstwhile intern, steadfast supporter and good pal Gavin Lees (which in itself is great news). Here's Ian's discussion of "Merlock Jones," the shape-shifting detective in E.C. Segar's Thimble Theatre (as seen in Popeye Vol. 3), and here's his analysis of Jim Blanchard's portrait of Osama bin Laden which appeared on the cover of The Stranger earlier this year. Not only that, Ian's also been contributing to The Comics Journal website, including this well-traveled recent interview with Brandon Graham. (And if you ever meet Ian in person, ask to see his theme sketchbook of Animal from The Muppet Show — it's giving my Yoda sketchbook a run for its money, I tell you what.)

R. Crumb cameo in Popeye?
Written by Mike Baehr | Filed under Robert CrumbPopeyeEC Segar 11 Jul 2011 2:51 PM

Segar's Crumb?

Our freelancer John Ohannesian, who's doing some cleanup and restoration for our next (and final) Popeye volume, came across this E.C. Segar portrait of R. Crumb. Ha! (Via the Fantagraphics Bookstore & Gallery Facebook page.)

Things to See/Bookmark: Stephen DeStefano on Tumblr
Written by Mike Baehr | Filed under Things to seeStephen DeStefanoPopeye 11 Jul 2011 2:20 PM

Cole Oyl statue rotation - Stephen DeStefano

Let's all thank whoever it was who convinced Stephen DeStefano to get on Tumblr! (Above, from Stephen's inaugural post: designs for a statuette of Cole Oyl, Olive Oyl's poppa.) Also, let's all send best wishes to Stephen for a speedy recovery from a kidney stone procedure he underwent today.

Daily OCD: 7/8/11
Written by Mike Baehr | Filed under Shimura TakakoRoy CranereviewsPopeyemangaKim DeitchEC SegarDaily OCDCaptain Easy 8 Jul 2011 7:20 PM

Today's Online Commentary & Diversions:

Captain Easy, Soldier of Fortune: The Complete Sunday Newspaper Strips Vol. 2 (1936-1937)

Review: "Though he was one of the genre’s pioneers, Roy Crane’s Captain Easy is arguably the most idiosyncratic of all the adventure strips. But it’s this blend of loud slapstick, young-boys-styled adventure and blatant sex appeal that make Captain Easy such a winning, fun strip to read." – Chris Mautner, Robot 6

Wandering Son Vol. 1

Review: "From any other culture this type of story would be crammed with angst and agony: gratuitously filled with cruel moments and shame-filled subtext, but Takako Shimura’s genteel and winningly underplayed first volume in this enchanting school saga [Wandering Son]... is resplendent with refined contentment, presenting the history in an open-minded spirit of childlike inquiry and accepting optimism that turns this book into a genuine feel-good experience." – Win Wiacek, Now Read This!

Popeye Vol. 5:

Lore: At Comic Book Resources, Brian Cronin investigates some Popeye-related urban legends

The Search for Smilin' Ed!

Lore: Kim Deitch's "Mad About Music: My Life in Records" column continues over at TCJ.com, with the new fourth installment turning to the early days of rock 'n' roll

Daily OCD: 7/7/11
Written by Mike Baehr | Filed under PopeyeLove and RocketsJaime HernandezEC SegarDavid BDaily OCD 7 Jul 2011 7:53 PM

Today's Online Commentary & Diversions:

Popeye Vol. 5:

Review: "...[T]he fifth [Popeye] collection, "Wha's a Jeep?", is just as vital and zippy as any of [the] earlier books, particularly in the daily strips.... This is great stuff — as I've said before, Segar's Popeye is not just one of the great American comics, it's one of the great comedy/adventure works of all time, full of brawling, joking, inexhaustible life." – Andrew Wheeler, The Antick Musings of G.B.H. Hornswoggler, Gent.

The Littlest Pirate King

Review: The Comics Journal's R. Fiore on David B.'s The Littlest Pirate King, in its entirety: "Speaking of comics that would make good movies, if Henry Selick is looking for his next project, this is it, right here."

Love and Rockets Book 22: Ghost of Hoppers

Analysis: At The Comics Grid, Tony Venezia examines Jaime Hernandez’s Ghost of Hoppers as a gothic text in the context of the concept of the Freudian uncanny (via Sean T. Collins)

OMG Shoes
Written by janice headley | Filed under Wilfred SantiagoPopeyefashionEC Segar21 9 Jun 2011 11:13 AM

I've just been loving all these Fantagraphics fashion posts I'm getting to write lately!  Keep it up, designers!!!

Clemente Sneakers 1

Clemente Sneakers 2

Clemente Sneakers 3

First up is this incredible pair of rare Roberto Clemente sneakers! Whoa. Here's the auction listing for 'em, and at that price, you better not be wearing them on the field!

[ Thanks to Anonymous Works for the tip! ]

Clemente Sneakers 4

Curious about that first pair, I dug around a little online, and came across these beauts, and some more information. Apparently, back in the 1970's, Clemente lent his name to this brand of Super Pro sneakers, sold exclusively in his homeland of Puerto Rico! I propose supplemental material on these shoes in a future Special Edition of 21: The Story of Roberto Clemente.

Olive Oyl Shoes

And I saved the best (in my girly-opinion) for last with these exquisite shoes, inspired by E.C. Segar's Popeye fashionista Olive Oyl. I sure wanna kidnap these handcrafted beauties by Israeli shoe designer Kobi Levi, but oops, looks like they're one-of-a-kind. Kobi, I will gladly pay you Tuesday for a pair of these today?

[ Props to Devlin Thompson and Cartoon Brew for the scoop! ]

Daily OCD: 4/22/11
Written by Mike Baehr | Filed under Stephen DeStefanoreviewsPopeyePeanutsJoe SaccoEC SegarDaily OCDCharles M Schulz 22 Apr 2011 7:18 PM

Today's Online Commentary & Diversions:

Lucky in Love Book 1: A Poor Man's History

Review: "Stephen DeStefano is nominated for the 2011 Eisner Awards for his artwork on this book [Lucky in Love Book 1] and understandably so. [...] His style on this book works so well, the feel and mood of the 1940's is dutifully established. The exaggeration in his cartoony style on this book especially with the characters is both hilarious and beautiful. From the linework, to the panel and page design, DeStefano just did an amazing job. Simply beautiful work here. The kind of work that leaves you lingering over every little line or design." – P.D. Houston, Renderwrx Productions

Safe Area Gorazde: The Special Edition

Plug: "After I read and loved Footnotes in Gaza, I had to get [Safe Area Gorazde: The Special Edition], right? It looks pretty flippin’ awesome, plus for this edition, there’s a lot of frontmatter by Sacco in which he discusses the circumstances in Bosnia in the early 1990s." – Greg Burgas, Comic Book Resources

Popeye Vol. 5:   The Complete Peanuts 1979-1980 (Vol. 15)

Plugs: "It’s an embarrassment of riches from the fine folks at Fantagraphics as they deliver not one, but two fantastic comic collections for aficionados to dive into. Not only do we get the 15th volume of The Complete Peanuts covering the years 1979-1980 and featuring an intro from Al Roker, but we also get the 5th volume of EC Segar’s Popeye, Wha’s A Jeep, which introduces us to the magical Jeep. Both volumes? Brilliant." – Ken Plume, FRED Entertainment

Daily OCD: 4/20/11
Written by Mike Baehr | Filed under Taking Punk to the MassesRoy CranereviewsPrince ValiantPopeyeLove and RocketsHal FosterGilbert HernandezEC SegarDaily OCD 20 Apr 2011 6:06 PM

Today's Online Commentary & Diversions:

Love from the Shadows

Review: "Erotic, harrowing, graphically violent, and astonishingly grim, Love from the Shadows sees Hernandez plunging ever further into his own heart of darkness. [...] Every line is heavy with sadness, with the desire of the character, and the character within the character, and the artist, and the audience, to escape. But if there’s one message you can draw from Gilbert Hernandez’s comics, it’s that once you enter that cave, there’s no going back. Christ, what a fucking book." – Sean T. Collins, The Comics Journal

Taking Punk to the Masses: From Nowhere to Nevermind - A Visual History from the Permanent Collection of Experience Music Project

Review: "Clearly Taking Punk to the Masses will appeal first and foremost to fans of Kurt Cobain, Nevermind, and everything Nirvana — but by placing this groundbreaking band within a cultural and historical context it becomes more than just another Nirvana book. In fact, you’ll be surprised at how much more there is between its covers, and the Nirvana artifacts are kept to a minimum. Instead, it tells the tale of underground American punk, the Seattle scene, and the grunge phenomenon. [...] Even if you haven’t had the chance to check out the EMP’s exhibit, ...Taking Punk to the Masses provides an intriguing visual and oral history of the generation that changed music — and the Northwest — for good." – Dan Coxon, CultureMob

Buz Sawyer Vol. 1: The War in the Pacific

Review: "The undisputed king of the adventure comic strip was Roy Crane. [...] Suddenly faced with a whole new audience and a world newly at war, Crane created a new strip for Hearst, the exploits of a daring Navy pilot named Buz Sawyer, beginning in 1943. The result was one of the greatest adventure strips ever, the first two years of which have been collected in Buz Sawyer: The War in the Pacific. [...] The bright-eyed, steely resolve of Crane's generation shines in every panel, making it a refreshing bit of nostalgia as well as an exemplar of sequential art. [...] For history buffs and comic fans alike, Roy Crane's flyboy provides a great escape from 21st-century cynicism." – John G. Nettles, Flagpole Magazine

Popeye Vol. 4:

Review: "It's called Popeye, Vol. 4: "Plunder Island"... and it's just as good and thrilling a mixture of low humor, high adventure, running gags, populist sentiment, brawling action, expressive drawing, and unforgettable characters as ever. [...] This is great stuff, and it's just as funny and enthralling as it was in the mid-30s when Segar was spinning it out, day by day, in the funny papers. Someone who can read Popeye and doesn't has no advantages to speak of over the mule, who cannot read Popeye." – Andrew Wheeler, The Antick Musings of G.B.H. Hornswoggler, Gent.

Prince Valiant Vol. 3: 1941-1942

Review: "A bit surprised by how much I enjoy this series [Prince Valiant], particularly how unironic it is. Beautiful drawings, of course." – Jason, Cats Without Dogs

Daily OCD Extra: a star for 21 and more reviews from Booklist
Written by Mike Baehr | Filed under Wilfred SantiagoThomas OttreviewsPrince ValiantPopeyePeanutsKrazy KatHal FosterGeorge HerrimanEC SegarDaily OCDCharles M Schulz21 8 Apr 2011 9:58 AM

This month's issue of Booklist brings a starred review for 21: The Story of Roberto Clemente by Wilfred Santiago and additional favorable reviews of 5 more of our recent releases, excerpted below:

21: The Story of Roberto Clemente

"Nearly every page brings a new compositional marvel, setting energetic, limber figures against stylized photographic backgrounds washed in sepia tones and Pirate-yellow highlights. The in-game sequences, though, are show-stoppers, taking advantage of dizzying perspective shifts to capture the fluid, whirling nature of the game as it moves in fits and starts through huge moments of pause into cracking shots of sizzling drama. It’s not a comprehensive biography by any means, nor does it try to be one. But for a book that matches the pure athleticism, unshakable compassion, and towering legacy of its subject, look no further." — Ian Chipman (Starred Review)

Popeye Vol. 5:

Popeye Vol. 5: "Wha's a Jeep?" by E.C. Segar: "The fifth oversize volume collecting Segar’s vintage 1930s newspaper strip sees two particularly notable events, the introduction of Popeye’s lovable pet from the fourth dimension, Eugene the Jeep, who can foretell the future — a talent that Olive Oyl and Wimpy predictably exploit at the racetrack — and the seafaring quest to find Popeye’s long-lost father, Poopdeck Pappy, who turns out to be even more irascible than his cantankerous son. The out-of-continuity Sunday pages are more humor-driven, allowing Segar’s most brilliant comic creation, the rotundly roguish J. Wellington Wimpy, to take the fore." – Gordon Flagg

Prince Valiant Vol. 3: 1941-1942

Prince Valiant Vol. 3: 1941-1942 by Hal Foster: "This period, with its far-flung story lines and lavishly detailed artwork, is arguably the acme of Foster’s four decades chronicling the bold exploits of his medieval hero. While the oversize pages don’t approach the expanse of the bygone broadsheet newspapers that were Valiant’s original home, this is the best showcase Foster’s epic creation has had since its original appearance more than 70 years ago." — Gordon Flagg

Krazy & Ignatz 1919-1921: A Kind, Belevolent and Amiable Brick

Krazy & Ignatz 1919-1921: A Kind, Belevolent and Amiable Brick by George Herriman: "Although nearly a century has elapsed since these episodes first saw print, nothing that’s appeared on newspaper comics pages in the intervening years has approached their graphic and linguistic sophistication, let alone their brazenly idiosyncratic singularity. The bounty of Herriman’s fanciful masterwork is enhanced by a pair of informative supplemental essays and Chris Ware’s strikingly stark cover design." – Gordon Flagg

The Complete Peanuts 1979-1980 (Vol. 15)

The Complete Peanuts 1979-1980 (Vol. 15) by Charles M. Schulz: "Although Schulz’s much-loved comic strip is considered timeless — the continued reprinting of decades- old episodes in today’s newspapers attests to its perennial appeal — it wasn’t immune to contemporary trends. In these episodes, Peppermint Patty advocates for women’s equity in sports and gets Bo Derek-inspired cornrows. In other anomalous sequences, Charlie Brown’s pals express uncharacteristic affection for him when he’s hospitalized, and Peppermint Patty falls in love with — of all people — Pig-Pen. But most of the strips here display the comfortable tropes, from Snoopy as a WWI flying ace to Linus awaiting the Great Pumpkin, that Peanuts fans grew to love during its five-decade run." – Gordon Flagg

R.I.P.: Best of 1985-2004

R.I.P.: Best of 1985-2004 by Thomas Ott: "With Ott’s trademark scratchboard style affording the highest possible contrast, this is some of the most stunningly crafted work in comics today." – Ray Olson