Home arrow Browse Shop

Search / Login

Quick Links:
Latest Releases
Browse by Artist
Love and Rockets Guide
Peanuts books
Disney books
More browsing options under "Browse Shop" above


Search: All Titles

Advanced Search
Login / Free Registration
Detail Search
Download Area
Show Cart
Your Cart is currently empty.

Subscribe

Sign up for our email newsletters for updates on new releases, events, special deals and more.

New Releases

How to Be Happy
How to Be Happy
$24.99
Add to Cart

Walt Disney's Mickey Mouse Vol. 5: Outwits the Phantom Blot [U.S./CANADA ONLY]
Walt Disney's Mickey Mouse Vol. 5: Outwits the Phantom Blot [U.S./CANADA ONLY]
$34.99
Add to Cart

Special Exits [Softcover Ed.]
Special Exits [Softcover Ed.]
$22.99
Add to Cart

Prince Valiant Vol. 9: 1953-1954
Prince Valiant Vol. 9: 1953-1954
$35.00
Add to Cart

all new releases

Category >> RIP MD

Daily OCD: 5/20/11
Written by Mike Baehr | Filed under Wilfred SantiagoRIP MDreviewsR Kikuo JohnsonPaul HornschemeierMark KalesnikoLove and RocketsLewis TrondheimLeslie SteinJoyce FarmerGilbert HernandezDavid BDaily OCDCarol SwainBlazing Combat21 20 May 2011 6:42 PM

Today's Online Commentary & Diversions:

21: The Story of Roberto Clemente

Review: "21: The Story of Roberto Clemente brings together comics and baseball, two of America's most popular conveyers of epic mythology. Author Wilfred Santiago also incorporates elements of classical and avant-garde jazz in his sinuously illustrated narrative of Clemente's life. It takes an imagination as rich as Mr. Santiago's to tap into various mythological languages to tell the Pittsburgh Pirate's iconic story... Instead of dwelling on sources of obvious resentment, Mr. Santiago defaults to illustrating Clemente's humanity. We're treated to close-ups of his most noble and ignoble moments. The artist refuses to treat him like a plastic saint, because a perfect Clemente would make boring reading, indeed. ...Wilfred Santiago has done as good a job as anyone ever has in reintroducing the longtime Pittsburgh Pirate to a new generation." – Tony Norman, Pittsburgh Post-Gazette

Eye of the Majestic Creature

Review: "You’d be hard-pressed to find a more downright affable character than blithely blitzed Larrybear, the young female focus of Leslie Stein’s ongoing semiautobiographical comic [Eye of the Majestic Creature ], whose first four issues are collected here.... Stein gives us the slackerly, star-eyed alternative to a cadre of 'misanthropic, self-pitying comics about unappreciated cartoonists,' as Tom De Haven characterized it... But where the aforementioned Crumb-descended misanthropes have all more or less grown up, Stein’s Larrybear is a naïve woman on the verge of Whatever, a cute Candide floundering about in an increasingly complicated world. ...[T]his book [is] such a pleasure..." – Richard Gehr, The Comics Journal

Approximate Continuum Comics

Review: "Lewis Trondheim is one of the world’s best cartoonists.... Approximate Continuum Comics is some of Trondheim’s earliest autobiographical work, dating mostly from 1993 and 1996. If you’re read his more recent slivers of life observations... then you already know the sublime wit and casual self-deprecation of Trondheim’s cartooning. Approximate Continuum Comics is where that [tack] begins." – Michael C. Lorah, Newsarama

Love from the Shadows

Review: "Love from the Shadows is a very strange story. Surreal is such an overused word, but it is the best description I can come up with to describe the tone of the work. There is a disjointed, dream-like progression to the narrative.... As with so much of Hernandez's work, it is beautifully illustrated. The art is suffused with emotion and atmosphere and eroticism. The work Hernandez does is a critical component to his examining all of the societal, psychological, and sexual issues. …Love from the Shadows [is] an intriguing, offbeat story that is open to examination and interpretation. …Love from the Shadows is an intellectually stimulating read. And the artwork is magnificent." – Benjamin Herman, Associated Content

The Littlest Pirate King

Review: "The Littlest Pirate King is a wonderful phantasmagoria, as likely to entertain a ten year old as a thirty year eight year old (and I say this having had the book pulled off my lap and spirited away by my own ten year old). There is a lovely innocence to proceedings, a seemingly uncalculated desire to thrill and chill and transport... that has had me flicking back through the book a good dozen times since I’ve read it. This is the kind of book that got me reading books when I was a wee nipper, and it’s the kind of book that keeps me reading now that I’m the furthest possible thing from a wee nipper." – Bookmunch

Blazing Combat [Softcover Ed. - Pre-Order]

Review: "Blazing Combat is a book I'm quite proud to have in my collection. It's a work of art, has a message that's strong even over 40 years after the material was first created, and I'll come back to this at least once every few years." – Philip Reed, BattleGrip

List: Library Journal's Martha Cornog gathers recommended graphic novels dealing with themes of Health & Medicine, including:

Special Exits

Special Exits by Joyce Farmer: "An excellent alert for those new to the path (for themselves or for relatives) and a validation for those already familiar with this normal yet seemly so abnormal life stage."

Alex

Alex by Mark Kalesniko: "This exploration of depression, futile escapism, and the healing power of art has been described as a difficult read but very funny."

Giraffes in My Hair: A Rock 'n' Roll Life

Giraffes in My Hair: A Rock 'n' Roll Life by Bruce Paley & Carol Swain: "Hanging out here and crashing there, Paley narrates vignettes of debauchery and daily life in a Woodstock version of American Splendor. Partner Swain's smudgy, black-and-white drawings carry his grimy, nostalgic account."

Mother, Come Home

Mother, Come Home by Paul Hornschemeier: "An exquisitely written and beautifully drawn exploration of grief."

RIP, M.D. [Pre-Order]

Rip M.D. by Mitch Shauer, Mike Vosburg et al.: "A 'full-color, all-ages adventure' with an animated cartoon series in development, and a promising bet for reluctant readers."

Night Fisher

List: Robot 6's Chris Mautner names "Six noteworthy debut comics," saying of R. Kikuo Johnson's Night Fisher "this tale of disaffected adolescence and drug dealing in Hawaii is certainly compelling and suggests that Johnson is an artist capable of producing great work. Unfortunately, he has yet to follow up on that initial promise. But Night Fisher still marks him as an artist to watch out for."

Mome Vol. 17 - Winter 2010

Profile: Time Out Chicago's Web Behrens catches up with Paul Hornschemeier: "'It is one of those names: You’re destined to either be a writer or scientist,' says local author-artist Paul, the man both blessed and saddled with the brainy surname. 'You’re not going to be a rock star with a name like Hornschemeier.'"

Video: behind the scenes with the creators of Rip M.D.
Written by Mike Baehr | Filed under videoRIP MD 26 Jan 2011 9:37 AM

Mitch Schauer, Michael Lessa and Mike Vosburg sat down to discuss the creation of their graphic novel Rip M.D., from influences to art process to interacting with fans, in this short video. Informative!

Daily OCD: 1/17/11
Written by Mike Baehr | Filed under Steve DitkoRIP MDreviewsMoto HagiomangaLove and RocketsLos Bros HernandezLinda MedleyJacques TardiDavid BDaily OCDCarl BarksBlake BellBest of 2010 17 Jan 2011 5:22 PM

Today's Online Commentary & Diversions:

Love and Rockets: New Stories #3 [with FREE Signed Bookplate]

List: At Seen, Sam Humphries names Love and Rockets: New Stories #3 The Best Comic of 2010: "While it’s astonishing to see Los Bros Hernandez deliver some of their greatest work at this stage in their careers, at the same time, it should be no surprise at all. They’ve been killing it for nearly 30 years. [...] Both brothers are digging deep into the psyche and hearts of the human condition. The results are powerfully moving."

It Was the War of the Trenches

List: "[It Was the War of the Trenches] burns with a sense of outrage at the meaningless slaughter and sheer injustice of the events of almost a century ago. A century ago, perhaps, but we should never, ever forget and works like Trenches serve both as a fascinating piece of comics work and also an accessible reminder of history that has now all but passed from living memory and relies on books, film and other media to remind us." – Joe Gordon, "Best of the Year," The Forbidden Planet International Blog Log

Plug: "It Was the War of the Trenches  by Jacques Tardi (Fantagraphics) – Tardi is, simply put, one of the most important and influential French comic artists of the last 30 years. This welcome translation of his harrowing and haunting first World War narrative is as good a place as any to start." – John Byrne, The Irish Times (via Robot 6)

The Extraordinary Adventures of Adèle Blanc-Sec Vol. 1: Pterror Over Paris and The Eiffel Tower Demon [Pre-Order]

Review: "Several artists have the ability to capture some physical element of a city or a time; Tardi summons all of that with a fealty to detail and a consistency that eventually yields a more rounded, complete experience. Go all in, and by [The Extraordinary Adventures of Adéle Blanc-Sec Vol. 1]'s final 20 pages one can feel the air hit people in the face when they stumble out of doors, sense the temperature, smell the panoply of city-borne scents. ...[B]oth stories reprinted here with Kim Thompson's droll translation positively whip at the notion of competence in higher places, the rationality of power, that anyone rich ever pays for anything, and the law-driven society generally, all until the skin shows, raw and bleeding. It's a gas... I could personally read 10,000 pages of this material, stopping to stare at the prettier parts, returning to such a book over an entire summer. [...] It's a rare work that makes you like it and wish others would, too, that's for sure." – Tom Spurgeon, The Comics Reporter

Castle Waiting Vol. 2

Review: "...Castle Waiting has been one of the most joyous comics discoveries for me of the last couple years. ...[D]espite this volume clocking in at 375 pages I read the whole thing in one sitting…and enjoyed every freaking second of it. I laughed repeatedly and more often than not was caught just smiling like an idiot as I read about these beautifully crafted characters and their completely boring but somehow also completely fascinating lives.  It doesn’t hurt that Medley is truly an incredible illustrator." – Kelly Thompson, Comic Book Resources

A Drunken  Dream and Other Stories [Pre-Order]

Review: "I frequently gasped, out loud, at the beauty of this goddamn thing. [...] Most of [the stories in A Drunken Dream] remind me of Jaime Hernandez, of all people, in that the force of the narrative is toward the protagonists coming to terms — with the damage done by a cruel mother, with the inspiration that arose unexpectedly from a childhood tragedy, with the sudden loss of a friendship through a shared mistake in judgment, with the death of a hated rival, with a necessary but traumatic decision, with the death of a parent. Or not! [...] Each story’s big narrative and emotional moments seem to swell within and explode out of these textures and lines, like they’ve actualized the potential energy there all along. [...] Reads like a dream, looks like a dream." – Sean T. Collins, Attentiondeficitdisorderly

Unexplored Worlds: The Steve Ditko Archives Vol. 2 [Pre-Order]

Review: "The back cover of Unexplored Worlds loudly proclaims, 'This is where Steve Ditko became Steve Ditko.' Indeed, in this second chronological volume of the Steve Ditko Archives, collecting 39 stories from 1956-57, we see the influential American cartoonist come into his voice. ...[I]t's fascinating to witness Ditko grow as a storyteller, to see the first hints of the layouts and compositions that would make his 1960s work on Spider-Man and Doctor Strange set the standard for decades to come." – Claude LaLumiere, The Montreal Gazette

The Littlest Pirate King

Review: "I think what ultimately struck me the most about The Littlest Pirate King (which B. adapted from a story by Pierre Mac Orlan) was how it weaves back and forth between innocent and grim. ...[I]t’s a gorgeous book. Even at its most nightmarish, there’s always something to admire within The Littlest Pirate King." – Greg McElhatton, Read About Comics

RIP, M.D. [Pre-Order]

Review: "[Rip M.D.] ...will delight monster-fans of all ages and signals a welcome return to upbeat and clever kids’ fiction. ...[T]his spectacular, spooktacular romp is a fabulously punchy, action-packed, wickedly funny treat for kids of all ages that will leave every reader voraciously hungry for more." – Win Wiacek, Now Read This!

Carl Barks

Coming Attractions: More Carl Barks reaction from Richard Cowdry at The Forbidden Planet International Blog Log (who also comments briefly on our latest Pogo update)

Daily OCD: 12/17/10
Written by Mike Baehr | Filed under Usagi YojimboStan SakaiRIP MDreviewsNate NealMoto HagiomangaLove and RocketsLos Bros HernandezJoyce FarmerJim WoodringGabriella GiandelliDavid BDaily OCDCarol TylerBest of 2010awardsaudio 17 Dec 2010 4:22 PM

Today's Online Commentary & Diversions from HuffPo, Flavorwire, Omnivoracious & elsewhere:

Weathercraft

List/Review: Critical Mob names Jim Woodring's Weathercraft one of the Top 10 Books of 2010. As a reminder, their review called it "the kind of Pilgrim's Progress tale that David Lynch might have conjured up if he were a cartoonist" (Lynch was a cartoonist, in fact) and "Woodring's best work yet. And for an artist of his caliber, that's saying something."

Love and Rockets: New Stories #3 [with FREE Signed Bookplate]

List: At Flavorwire, Desert Island's Gabe Fowler names Love and Rockets: New Stories #3 #9 of 10 of the Year's Most Buzzed About Comic Releases: "Lots of people were blown away by this — it’s a comic that epitomizes 20 years worth of work in 50 pages. Jamie Hernandez has just been doing it so long that he’s a natural. Comics just seem to flow out of this guy."

A Drunken  Dream and Other Stories [Pre-Order]

List: Julien from Librairie Drawn & Quarterly names A Drunken Dream and Other Stories by Moto Hagio one of "Les 5 livres indispensables de l'année" (the 5 essential books of the year): "With coming of age stories that are sentimental, dramatic, poetic, offbeat and not mawkish..., A Drunken Dream and Other Stories showcases trailblazing manga has forged its own way since the '70s." (Translated from French.)

Plug: "In typical Fantagraphics fashion, A Drunken Dream is presented in a gorgeous, golden-hued, and hardbound package. From the front to end papers, it is packed with stories, artwork — both black and white and in color — and an interview with the influential artist that’s just as engaging as her stories. For me, 'Iguana Girl' was the standout tale, full of emotional and psychological twists. It’s sophisticated and defies expectations." – Alex Carr, Omnivoracious "Graphic Novel Friday: Holiday Gift Guide"

Special Exits [Pre-Order]

Review/Profile: A feature on Joyce Farmer and Special Exits by Paul Gallagher at The Huffington Post: "Farmer's beautiful, moving and truly exceptional book deals with the very real closing down age brings, and its problems. Rarely have I read such an honest, heart-breaking, yet darkly humorous tale."

You'll Never Know Book 2: Collateral Damage [Pre-Order]

Review: "Carol Tyler has chosen a scrapbook format for her memoir series You'll Never Know, but the editing is the reverse of the usual—instead of airbrushing over her family's troubles, she focuses on them. [...] Tyler has a good ear; her conversations, whether it's the grownups kidding around when she was a child or the grown daughters trying to figure out how to negotiate their parents' illnesses, always ring true. Her art is sketchy and expressive, changing to fit the story, often deliberately breaking borders as she transitions from one setting to another." – Brigid Alverson, Graphic Novel Reporter

RIP, M.D. [Pre-Order]

Review: "...Rip M.D. is a bit silly, but it’s offbeat and funny too. It’s got the kind of gross-out humor that kids will love... While the book has its own somewhat silly logic, it also has a tremendously engaging look and feel that’s all its own." – John Hogan, Graphic Novel Reporter

The Littlest Pirate King

Review: "Stark and vivid, scary and heartbreakingly sad as only a children’s tale can be, this darkly swashbuckling romp [The Littlest Pirate King] is a classy act with echoes of Pirates of the Caribbean (which it predates by nearly a century) that will charm, inspire and probably cause a tear or two to well up." – Win Wiacek, Now Read This!

Usagi Yojimbo: The Special Edition [Pre-Order]

Plug: "While I’ve yet to see a copy, Fantagraphics’ Usagi Yojimbo: The Special Edition finally released this December, and it clocks in at 1,200 pages. The 25th Anniversary of Stan Sakai’s rabbit ronin is celebrated across two hardcovers housed in a slipcase. The set promises plenty of extras, and its delayed publication has been lamented loudly enough to make this holiday publication cause for plenty of raised glasses of eggnog." – Alex Carr, Omnivoracious "Graphic Novel Friday: Holiday Gift Guide"

Awards: ActuaBD reports on the nominees for the Prix Artémisia, including Gabriella Giandelli's Interiorae (in its French edition). "This is an award directed towards female creators from an association bearing the same name as the prize," reports The Comics Reporter.

The Sanctuary

Interview (Audio): Host Robin McConnell chats with Nate Neal about Nate's new graphic novel The Sanctuary and other topics on the Inkstuds radio programme; in his blog post Robin says "Sanctuary has a really great language all to itself, and his work in Mome utilizes a while different skill set. Good comics."

Daily OCD: 12/16/10
Written by Mike Baehr | Filed under Usagi YojimboStan SakaiRIP MDreviewsMoto HagioMichael KuppermanMegan KelsomangaJasonDestroy All MoviesDaily OCDComing Attractions 16 Dec 2010 5:42 PM

Today's Online Commentary & Diversions:

Artichoke Tales [Pre-Order]

Review: "[Megan Kelso's] first full-length graphic novel, Artichoke Tales, raises the stakes seen in her short stories and makes the relationships between three generations of characters one of simultaneous longing and resentment. [...] This story is entirely about relationships, both familial and romantic. At the same time, it’s also about one’s relationship to one’s country, one’s religion, and one’s ethnicity, and the ways in which resorting to war to solve conflicts changes all of these relationships irrevocably." – Rob Clough, The Comics Journal

What I Did [Pre-Order]

Review: "Jason’s work always jumps directly into the reader’s brain and heart, using the beastly and unnatural to gently pose eternal questions about basic human needs in a soft but relentless quest for answers. That you don’t ever notice the deep stuff because of the clever gags and safe, familiar 'funny-animal' characters should indicate just how good a cartoonist he is… This collection [What I Did], despite being early works resonates with the artist’s preferred themes and shines with his visual dexterity. It’s one of Jason’s very best and will warm the cockles of any fan’s heart." – Win Wiacek, Now Read This!

Usagi Yojimbo: The Special Edition [Pre-Order]

Interview: Newsarama's Chris Arrant talks to Stan Sakai about the past and future of Usagi Yojimbo: "When did I hit my stride? Well, I think Usagi really started to come together with the first four Fantagraphics issues – before that he’d appeared in short stories and anthologies, but I was able to devote a lot of attention to detail and characterization with that first story-arc. For me as a writer and artist, I think it would be 'The Kite Story.' That was the first story that I did a lot of research on, and it really came together smoothly."

RIP, M.D. [Pre-Order]

Profile: The Tulsa World's Matt Gleason talks to Rip M.D. creator Mitch Schauer: "A young Mitch Schauer often sympathized with the classic movie monsters that populated late-night TV. 'They were never really bad on purpose,' the longtime Tulsan said from his home in the San Fernando Valley of Los Angeles. Schauer particularly sympathized with Boris Karloff's Frankenstein. 'He didn't want to be created,' said the 54-year-old. 'Then he gets created, and everybody wants to throw rocks at him, crucify him or burn him. Frankenstein was just misunderstood.'"

Destroy All Movies!!!: The Complete Guide to Punks on Film [Pre-Order]

Plug: "Punk, new wave weirdos, 80's cult legends and everything in between. Alamo Drafthouse's Zack Carlson and Vulcan Video's Bryan Connolly have a shared insanity for punk rock cinema. Destroy All Movies!!! The Complete Guide to Punks on Film isn't just for horror fans, but every horror fan should own a copy." – Alison Nastasi, Cinematical (The Moviefone Blog)

http://www.fantagraphics.com/images/flog/artistthumbs/blackcatskbook_reasonably_small.png

Plug: In an article on Splitsider surveying comedians about their experience on Twitter, the great Peter Serafinowicz once again name-drops his pal "genius comic artist and writer" Michael Kupperman

A Drunken  Dream and Other Stories [Pre-Order]

Plug: Attention Eisner Awards judges! At The Manga Curmudgeon, David Welsh suggests Moto Hagio and her book A Drunken Dream and Other Stories for nominations in several Eisner Award categories

The Arctic Marauder - Jacques Tardi

Coming Attractions: Library Journal plugs four of our upcoming Spring 2011 titles in their latest "Graphic Novel Prepub Alert"

Write a punchline, win a copy of Rip M.D.
Written by Mike Baehr | Filed under RIP MDcontests 14 Dec 2010 1:30 PM

http://www.fantagraphics.com/images/flog/mike/201012/lb-caption.jpg

The good folks at Lincoln Butterfield Animation are having a Facebook contest: come up with a punchline for this cartoon and you could win a copy of Rip M.D.! See here for the rules. Have fun and good luck!

Rip M.D. signings in Burbank & Tulsa
Written by Mike Baehr | Filed under RIP MDevents 8 Dec 2010 1:16 PM

Rip M.D. by Mitch Schauer, Michael Vosburg et al.

The creators of Rip M.D. have two signing events lined up this month:

On Friday December 10 the whole creative team (writer/artist Mitch Shauer, inker Mike Vosburg, and color/effects crew Justin Yamaguchi & Michael Lessa) will do a demo, raffle giveaway and signing at the House of Secrets comic shop in Burbank, CA. Starts at 5PM and may go as late as 8PM. RSVP on Facebook.

And on Saturday December 18 Mitch Schauer returns to his hometown of Tulsa, OK to sign copies of Rip M.D. at Borders Books & Music on Yale St. If we get any more details on that one we'll pass them along.

Daily OCD: 11/26/10
Written by Mike Baehr | Filed under RIP MDreviewsLove and RocketsJaime HernandezGilbert HernandezFantagraphics BookstoreDestroy All MoviesDaily OCDBlake BellBill Everett 26 Nov 2010 4:41 PM

Online Commentary & Diversions, back from the U.S. holiday:

Fantagraphics Winter 2011 Catalog

Gift Guides: Rob McMonigal of Panel Patter goes through our new mail-order catalog (about which more soon!) to pick out his holiday gift-giving recommendations; The Beat and The Comics Reporter both post guides to holiday gift books with several of our books mentioned

RIP, M.D. [Pre-Order]

Review: "Freakazoid producer Mitch Schauer's debut graphic novel Rip M.D. is a warm and spooky tale for monster kids of all ages. [...] Drawn and inked in pitch-perfect EC Comics monster style, Rip M.D. pushes every one of my monster-loving buttons. The writing is witty, the plot sprightly, and the monsters are the heroes I always knew them to be. What's not to like?" – Cory Doctorow, Boing Boing

New Tales of Old Palomar #1

Review: "Beto’s contribution to the Igort-edited Ignatz line of international art-comic series, [New Tales of Old Palomar] present[s] a suite of stories from Palomar’s past. They fill in a few notable lacuane — where Tonantzin and Diana came from, what was up with the gang of kids we’d occasionally see who were a few years older than the Pipo/Heraclio group, how Chelo lost her eye. A lot of this turns out to be really fascinating... But to me it’s not what’s told that matters, but how it’s told. [...] Beautiful stuff." – Sean T. Collins, Attentiondeficitdisorderly

Fire & Water: Bill Everett, the Sub-Mariner and the Birth of Marvel Comics [with FREE Signed Bookplate]

Review: "[Fire and Water: Bill Everett, The Sub-Mariner, and the Birth of Marvel Comics] is a good and valuable book, but one wonders what Bell could do with a better documented figure, if he can find an angle or provide insights not seen before. But enjoy it for what it is, a portrait and gallery of a talented, troubled artist whose work should be better known today." – Christopher Allen, Trouble with Comics

Love and Rockets Book 18: Locas In Love (Unpublished)

Review: Andrea Ciolfi of Lo Spazio Blanco on the Italian edition of Locas in Love by Jaime Hernandez

Destroy All Movies!!!: The Complete Guide to Punks on Film [Pre-Order]

Plug: "...I’ve read a lot of books about weird films, but I’ve never seen one quite like Destroy All Movies: The Complete Guide to Punks on Film by Zack Carlson and Bryan Connolly ($35, Fantagraphics). Printed in black-and-white and day-glo pink, the book catalogs virtually every single movie that ever featured a punk on-screen. I’m not just talking about the classics, like Rock ’N’ Roll High School and Repo Man, either. I’m talking about movies like Star Trek IV, which features a punk rocker in exactly one scene. And the book has an interview with the actor, too! Now that’s attention to detail." – Will Pfeifer, Rockford Register Star

Fantagraphics Bookstore & Gallery

Plug: The Seattle Times travel section calls Fantagraphics Bookstore & Gallery a "hot shop" in Georgetown and says it's "heaven for fans of comics"

Daily OCD: 11/22/10
Written by Mike Baehr | Filed under RIP MDreviewsPrince ValiantMomeLove and RocketsJaime HernandezHal FosterGilbert HernandezGene DeitchFour Color FearDaily OCD 22 Nov 2010 5:04 PM

Today's Online Commentary & Diversions:

Four Color Fear: Forgotten Horror Comics of the 1950s [Pre-Order]

Review: "Greg Sadowski‘s excellent Four Color Fear: Forgotten Horror Comics of the 1950s (Fantagraphics Books) was the first of a quartet of books on horror comics to surface this fall, and for my money, it’s arguably the most invaluable of the bunch. [...] There are some real revelations here, and I can tell you that this hardcore horror comics scholar/collector/creator is eternally grateful for all that Sadowski and Benson have added herein to a richer knowledge of these unique comics and this grossly misrepresented and misunderstood period in comics history. With an eye toward entertaining fully as well as curating, Sadowski’s greatest accomplishment here is making Four Color Fear such a fun and engaging read, cover-to-cover. [...] In this, Sadowski brings far more care to his anthology than any of the original editors of these comics seemed to; the cumulative effect, at times, is intoxicating, and the ways in which both the individual art styles and the narrative content are woven into a satisfying tapestry are often witty, sly and insidious. There’s a lot of smart work, here, and as a result it’s a super read for everyone, whether you’ve never before sampled this era’s strange fruit or are (like me) a long-time fan and collector." – Steve Bissette, The Schulz Library Blog

RIP, M.D. [Pre-Order]

Review/Interview: "That meeting place between responsible parenting and letting your kids love monsters is at the heart of the new graphic novel Rip M.D.... The parental dilemma (just how much horrific stuff should we let our kid get into?) is mined as a story point, while the book itself serves as a family-friendly gateway to gruesomeness. ..[T]the story focuses on Ripley’s personal growth as he accepts responsibility for these monstrous misfits. It’s a legitimately positive message delivered via a story about creatures, all of which sits close to Schauer’s heart. 'I grew up an only child, predominantly surrounded by adults,' Schauer recalls. 'I had to find something to entertain myself. It turned out to be monsters. [...] I’m trying to pull from the emotion I felt when I first saw those classic monsters, not as something to fear but something that was misunderstood.' [...] Rip M.D. doesn’t skimp on the macabre while reinforcing the ideal of an understanding family and the importance of not passing judgment on society’s outcasts…at least until you know them well enough to deliver an informed diagnosis." – Jack Bennett, Fangoria

Love and Rockets Book 25: High Soft Lisp [with FREE Signed Bookplate]

Review: "In High Soft Lisp, Gilbert traces the relationship history of Fritz Martinez, the ultimate sex goddess in a career full of them, and in so doing reveals that her every fetish outfit and sexual free-for-all is fruit from the poisoned tree. Lots of characters in this book enjoy the living shit out of Fritz’s sexuality, not least Fritz herself, but to a man and woman they’re revealed to be creepily predatory about it, embracing the worst in themselves and encouraging the worst in Fritz. And here’s the thing: What have we been doing over the hundreds of pages we’ve spent watching Fritz adorably and kinkily fuck her way through the post-Palomar cast of Beto’s comics? What has Beto been doing? What does that say about all of us?" – Sean T. Collins, Attentiondeficitdisorderly

Mome Vol. 20 - Fall 2010

Review: "Mome... is where the smart kids with the sharpest pencils, shiniest pens, biggest brushes and best software go to play before they blow your minds in great big award-winning graphic novels. It is intense, sometimes hard to read and crafted to the highest production standards. This volume signals five incredibly impressive years and the eclectic graphic mix presented here augurs well for the next fifty… Whether you’re new to comics, fresh from the mainstream ghettos or just need something new, Mome always promises — and delivers — a decidedly different read." – Win Wiaceck, Now Read This

Love and Rockets: New Stories #3 [with FREE Signed Bookplate]

Interview: Bef got two minutes with Jaime Hernandez

Terr'ble Thompson

Plug: Allan Holtz at Stripper's Guide presents some samples of Gene Deitch's Terr'ble Thompson and recommends our collection of the strip

Prince Valiant Vol. 1: 1937-1938 + Vol. 2: 1939-1940

Plug: In the head-scratchingest gift guide ever, Tom Mason of Comix 411 suggests our Prince Valiant volumes as a wedding gift for Prince William: "One or two volumes would be nice for the royal couple. They can pretend it’s history."

Rip M.D. creators interview video
Written by Mike Baehr | Filed under videoRIP MD 12 Nov 2010 4:36 PM

Watch this adorable chat that The KB Life had with the creators of Rip M.D. at the Long Beach Comic Con a couple of weeks ago.

<< Start < Previous Page 1 2 3 Next Page > End >>