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Category >> Robert Goodin

Things to see: 9/10/10
Written by Mike Baehr | Filed under Tim LaneThings to seeSteven WeissmanSteve BrodnerSergio PonchioneRobert GoodinRenee FrenchPaul HornschemeierMiss Lasko-GrossMatthias LehmannMark KalesnikoLaura ParkKevin HuizengaJosh SimmonsJohn HankiewiczJim FloraJasonHans RickheitGabrielle BellDrew WeingDrew FriedmanDerek Van GiesonDebbie DrechslerDash ShawDame DarcyAl Columbia 10 Sep 2010 6:26 PM

Periodic clips & strips — click for improved/additional viewing and possible artist commentary at the sources:

reality TV/music stars - Drew Friedman

Drew Friedman illustrates the latest crop of pop stars-cum-reality TV stars for Billboard (with commentary)

Henni - Miss Lasko-Gross

• The cover of a new minicomic Miss Lasko-Gross is debuting at SPX (via Facebook)

Amazing Facts and Beyond! - Kevin Huizenga

• From Kevin Huizenga, a new Amazing Facts and Beyond with Leon Beyond strip

work in progress - Matthias Lehmann

Two more stages in Matthias Lehmann's scratchboard work in progress

hobos - Jason

• From Jason: a 1996 anthology story page; a lizard lady; an illustration of U2; and three early cartoons

Hole - Steven Weissman

Steven Weissman drew Courtney Love for The Stranger's Bumbershoot guide; also, "I, Anonymous" (original, as printed), and ice cream roundup

panels - John Hankiewicz

Two more panels from an upcoming comic by John Hankiewicz 

Prim & Fancy - Jeffrey Meyer

New Mutants #33 - Derek Van Gieson

• Two good ones at the Covered blog: Jeffrey Meyer does Al Columbia's Pim & Francie and Derek Van Gieson does New Mutants #33

Gomorrah - Robert Goodin

• Relatedly, at his Wood Paneled Basement blog Robert Goodin says "The Criterion Collection curated a film festival for this year's All Tomorrow's Parties in New York. Comic artists were asked to create posters for the different movies and I did the one above for Gomorrah."

Lupine Nihilist - Dame Darcy

• Original art, crafts and other good stuff in Dame Darcy's latest blog update

future - Drew Weing

Drew Weing posts this snippet of a comic story he has in the current issue of the Oxford American; Josh Simmons posts an even less revealing bit of his strip from the same issue

Belligerent Piano - Tim Lane

• The latest installment of Tim Lane's Belligerent Piano

Pink & Black Cats - Jim Flora

• At the Jim Flora art blog: a 1960 tempera sketch, 1991 sketchbook & journal pages

squirrel - Debbie Drechsler

Debbie Drechsler sketches squirrels and other fauna, plus a heron

San Diego - Gabrielle Bell

Gabrielle Bell's San Diego adventures continue in part 6 of her Comic-Con Comicumentary

Pacer - Mark Kalesniko

Mark Kalesniko's AMC Pacer reference sketches for Freeway move to the interior

Riunione di Condominio - Sergio Ponchione

Sergio Ponchione presents "Riunione di Condominio" ("Condo Meeting") from the new issue of Linus

Monsieur le Moon - Paul Hornschemeier

Paul Hornschemeier's latest t-shirt design for his Forlorn Funnies Shirt Shop

Lucky

Another heartrending Lewis strip from Laura Park 

Repetition - Josh Simmons

Josh Simmons presents his strip from Bound & Gagged; also, "Quacker Alley" isn't credited to Josh but it sure looks like one of his

bunnytwine - Renee French

• From Renee French: scrote face girl, Barry the bird swimming, bunny with twine, a popsicle, and a series of shadowy things

daily drawing 7 - Dash Shaw

Dash Shaw's Daily Drawing nos. 3, 4, 5, 6, & 7, plus his animated sitcom pitch — I'd watch it

Paul Conrad - Steve Brodner

Steve Brodner takes on a hero and a villain: Paul Conrad and Pastor Terry Jones respectively

Ectopiary page 40 - Hans Rickheit

Hans Rickheit's Ectopiary page 40 — our Dutch-speaking readers may be interested to know that Ectopiary is being translated and serialized at Serieland

Bound & Gagged art show at Secret Headquarters opens Friday
Written by Mike Baehr | Filed under Zak SallyRobert GoodinKim DeitchKazJosh Simmonseventsart showsAndrice ArpAnders Nilsen 31 Aug 2010 10:11 AM

Bound & Gagged flyer

Holy smokes, take a look at the lineup for this art show organized by Tom Neely opening this Friday at Secret Headquarters in L.A.: from the Fantagraphics roster alone you've got Andrice Arp, Kim Deitch, Robert Goodin, Kaz, Anders Nilsen, Zak Sally, and Josh Simmons, plus a host of other all-stars from the small-press world. Amazing!

Now in stock: Mome Vol. 19 - Summer 2010
Written by Mike Baehr | Filed under Tim LaneT Edward BakRobert GoodinOlivier Schrauwennew releasesMomeJosh SimmonsGilbert HernandezDJ BryantConor OKeefe 16 Aug 2010 12:30 PM

Just arrived in our warehouse and ready to ship:

Mome Vol. 19 - Summer 2010 by various artists (cover by Josh Simmons)

Mome Vol. 19 - Summer 2010
by various artists; edited by Eric Reynolds

128-page color/b&w 7" x 9" softcover • $14.99
ISBN: 978-1-60699-349-1

Add to CartMore Info & Previews

The acclaimed anthology of contemporary comics steams toward its landmark 20th issue. This issue leads off with the cover story, the first part of the satiric psychedelic epic "The White Rhinoceros," drawn by Josh Simmons and written by The Partridge in the Pear Tree. It is our privilege to welcome the great Gilbert Hernandez to the pages of Mome with a brand-new story starring his beloved character Roy! Also debuting this issue, exciting newcomer D.J. Bryant, with what may be the most hard-boiled story to appear in Mome yet. And making return appearances: Olivier Schrauwen, Tim Lane, Conor O'Keefe, and Robert Goodin with new stories, and T. Edward Bak with the continuation of his epic "Wild Man" serial.

Download an EXCLUSIVE 9-page PDF excerpt (1.6 MB) with a page from every artist in the issue, plus the Table of Contents.

Daily OCD: 7/29/10
Written by Mike Baehr | Filed under Walt KellyrockRobert GoodinMoto HagioMegan KelsoJon AdamsDaily OCDCharles M SchulzCCICathy MalkasianAlexander Theroux 29 Jul 2010 4:42 PM

Online Commentary & Diversions:

Temperance

Tunes: At Largehearted Boy, Cathy Malkasian provides a musical playlist for her new graphic novel Temperance

Origin Stories - Robert Goodin

Interview: Snap Judgment's Stephanie Foo talks to Mome contributors Jon Adams & Robert Goodin, among others, about their superhero juvenilia in a slideshow with audio

Charles M. Schulz letter to Walt Kelly

History: At Comics Comics, Tim Hodler posts a 1954 letter from Charles M. Schulz to Walt Kelly provided by Jeet Heer

Artichoke Tales [Pre-Order]

Plug: Eat, Sleep & Read! spotlights Artichoke Tales by Megan Kelso

Comic-Con International logo

Comic-Con: For MTV IGGY, Deb Aoki covers Moto Hagio's appearance at Comic-Con: "Besides signing copies of her new book and sketching for fans, Hagio also talked about her work at two panels, charming the crowd with her wit and honesty."

Reviewer: For the Wall Street Journal, Alexander Theroux reviews Gary Shteyngart's new novel Super Sad True Love Story

Things to see: 7/19/10
Written by Mike Baehr | Filed under Tom KaczynskiTim LaneThings to seeSteven WeissmanSteve BrodnerrockRobert GoodinRenee FrenchNoah Van SciverLaura ParkKevin HuizengaJosh SimmonsJon Adamsjohn kerschbaumJohn HankiewiczJoe KimballJim WoodringHans RickheitGary PanterDrew WeingDerek Van GiesonDebbie Drechsler 19 Jul 2010 12:31 AM
Periodic clips & strips -- click for improved/additional viewing at the sources:

Jung outtake - Robert Goodin

Robert Goodin presents an outtake page from his story "The Spiritual Crisis of Carl Jung" in Mome Vol. 19

Jimbo (Party Ball) - Gary Panter

Gary Panter announces a new Jimbo minicomic

Frank in Frizland - Jim Woodring

Manhog's Holiday - Jim Woodring

Jim Woodring presents two Frank favorites, Frank in Frizland and Manhog's Holiday, now in full painted color

Cartoon Boy - John Kerschbaum

• It's your all-new weekly installment of "Cartoon Boy" from John Kerschbaum

Amazing Facts and Beyond with Leon Beyond - Kevin Huizenga

Fight or Run - Kevin Huizenga

New Construction - Kevin Huizenga

• From Kevin Huizenga, a new Amazing Facts and Beyond with Leon Beyond, new Fight or Run action, and more process at New Construction 

I, Anonymous - Steven Weissman

Barack Hussein Obama

• From Steven Weissman, this week's "I, Anonymous" and from his sketchbook chopper trike & portait of D. Clowes etc.

Two Figures - John Hankiewicz

• From John Hankiewicz, four versions of two figures

Set to Sea - Drew Weing

Drew Weing's Set to Sea pages 110 & 111

Belligerent Piano - Tim Lane

• The latest installment of Belligerent Piano by Tim Lane

hawk - Debbie Drechsler

Debbie Drechsler draws hawks and other birds at the cemetery ("Cemetery Hawks" — there's your new band name)

The Plan - Noah Van Sciver

Noah Van Sciver has a plan

Hot and Bothered

Laura Park & friends "enjoy" summer together

Haunted Quacker - Josh Simmons

Josh Simmons gets Woodring-esque with the Haunted Quacker; plus shark attack Quacker (with Wendy Chin), Ecstatic Quacker, Big Time Quacker 

wormdream - Renee French

• From Renee French: big worm, running man, fly baby, bulb neck, little kid, cutaway hair rock

Gerald Ford - Steve Brodner

Steve Brodner remembers Gerald Ford

Ectopiary page 33 - Hans Rickheit

Page 33 of Hans Rickheit's Ectopiary; also, he reveals his drawing process

Lightning Bolt - Tom Kaczynski

Tom Kaczynski draws the Lightning Bolt show

Truth Serum - Jon Adams

• This week's Truth Serum by Jon Adams

Tonstartssbandht?

Joe Kimball posts a couple more concert posters

Ebersole Versus Carberry

• Things to Hear Dept: Stream 5 new songs by Derek Van Gieson's band Ebersole Versus Carberry on their MySpace page

Things to see: 7/13/10
Written by Mike Baehr | Filed under Tom KaczynskiThings to seeThe Comics JournalSteven WeissmanStephen DeStefanoSophie CrumbSergio PonchioneRobert GoodinRichard SalaRenee FrenchPopeyePeanutsPaul HornschemeierNoah Van SciverMomemerchMark KalesnikoLorenzo MattottiLaura ParkKevin HuizengaJosh SimmonsJim FloraJim BlanchardHans RickheitFrank SantorofashionDrew WeingDebbie DrechslerDash ShawCharles M SchulzBob Fingerman 13 Jul 2010 4:51 PM

Periodic (and tardy... so busy) clips & strips — click for improved/additional viewing at the sources:

Lorenzo Mattotti - World Cup illustrations

Lorenzo Mattotti World Cup illustrations posted at the Forbidden Planet International Blog

hellscape - Bob Fingerman

Bob Fingerman posts a couple of concept illustrations for his in-progress prose novel The Hell of It

reanimator - Dash Shaw

Dash Shaw posts some storyboards for his in-progress animated film The Ruined Cast

I, Anonymous - Steven Weissman

• Last week's "I, Anonymous" spot by Steven Weissman; also, if you want to see the scanned version of the current Barack Hussein Obama strip, it's here; also, the greatest Little League team photo ever

A Train - Frank Santoro

• From Frank Santoro: a subway sketch, a color-matching analysis swatch thingy, and a funny collage

Elvis Has Left the Building - Noah Van Sciver

Shock SuspenStories 12 - Noah Van Sciver

Noah Van Sciver recounts helping John Porcellino move, and at Covered, takes on an Al Feldstein EC classic

Kid T - Kevin Huizenga

Getting Things Done - Kevin Huizenga

Glenn Ganges - Kevin Huizenga

• From Kevin Huizenga: psychedelic explorations with Photoshop filters and aspects of McSkulls at Fight or Run; a helpful diagram at New Construction; and Glenn Ganges roughs at his flagship The Balloonist

"When you Orcs are through fighting, you can clean up this tell, it is a pig sty and a disgrace. Do you hear me? Just look at this mess– skulls and guts everywhere. Do you act like this at home?"

• The latest prose burst from Gary Panter

Set to Sea page 108 - Drew Weing

Drew Weing's Set to Sea pages 108 & 109

Mad Night page 148 - Richard Sala

Richard Sala presents 3 original pages from Mad Night (and they're for sale)

The Jazz Workshop logo - Jim Flora?

• A mystery: is this lettering the work of Jim Flora?

Diana Rigg - Jim Blanchard

Jim Blanchard paints Diana Rigg as Emma Peel

crows - Debbie Drechsler

Debbie Drechsler sketches birds and mammals

The Inferior Five - Kevin Nowlan

• A Kevin Nowlan spot illo for The Comics Journal, 1981 (anyone who can identify the issue number, please leave a comment)

Girl in Orange Stripes 2 - Mark Kalesniko

Mark Kalesniko's second take on the Girl in Orange Stripes

Club Dogo - Sergio Ponchione

Sergio Ponchione posts part of the "bonus track" strip he did for the book La Legge del Cane by Jake La Furia & Guè Pequeno

Yachts! - Paul Hornschemeier

• It's Paul Hornschemeier's majestic weekly t-shirt design for his Forlorn Funnies Shirt Shop

Yarr!

Feel better soon, Laura Park

the littlest quacker - Josh Simmons

• From Josh Simmons & co., Quacker Supreme & Tiniest Quacker

rock - Renee French

• From Renee French: fly, hair rock, doodle, dude, rock

tit & gun - Sophie Crumb

Sophie Crumb posts a mess of new drawings and teases her upcoming book

Popeye the Sailor 1941-1943 DVD - Stephen DeStefano

Stephen DeStefano talks about his Popeye art & design work (such as the DVD illustrations above) with Jason Anders of Fulle Circle

Ectopiary page 32 - Hans Rickheit

slagheap - Hans Rickheit

Page 32 of Hans Rickheit's Ectopiary; also, a "forgotten Cochlea & Eustachia drawing " that makes a dandy desktop wallpaper

The Spiritual Crisis of Carl Jung - Robert Goodin

Robert Goodin presents an excerpt from "The Spiritual Crisis of Carl Jung," his story in Mome Vol. 19 (out tomorrow!)

Zine Fest panel sketch - Tom Kaczynski

Tom Kaczynski's sketch and report from the Twin Cities Zinefest

Peanuts promo - Charles M. Schulz

• At the Rosebud Archives blog, another vintage Peanuts ad sheet

Things to see: 7/8/10
Written by Mike Baehr | Filed under videoTim LaneThings to seeT Edward BakSteve BrodnerRosebud ArchivesRobert GoodinRenee FrenchPeanutsNoah Van SciverMark KalesnikoMarco CoronaLilli CarréKevin HuizengaJosh SimmonsJon AdamsJohnny RyanJohn HankiewiczJim FloraHans RickheitGary PanterFrank SantoroEleanor DavisDrew WeingDerek Van GiesonDebbie DrechslerDash ShawCharles M SchulzAnders Nilsen 7 Jul 2010 11:06 PM

Periodic clips & strips (normal posting schedule returns next week, probably) — click for improved/additional viewing at the sources:

Peanuts promotion

On the Rosebud Archives blog, a rare Peanuts promotional flyer (Rosebud Archives at Fantagraphics)

A video from Dash Shaw... some kind of teaser or something? Even if it's just a joke, it's pretty funny

prints - T. Edward Bak

print - Lilli Carré

print - John Hankiewicz

T. Edward Bak, Lilli Carré and John Hankiewicz (top to bottom) all have pieces in Pony Club Gallery's current print show The Great Outdoors (available for purchase here)

New Earthly Screenprint - Eleanor Davis

• This is one part of a three-piece screenprint by Eleanor Davis for a print show at GRNY

Frank Santoro

• A painting (background?) and collage by Frank Santoro

Fight or Run? - Kevin Huizenga

• From Kevin Huizenga: Burier vs. Exer at Fight or Run

"The doleful sirens are beginning to wail over on the ziggarat. Feeding time."

• Another short story from Gary Panter

Set to Sea - Drew Weing

Drew Weing's Set to Sea, pages 106 & 107

sketch - Marco Corona

• A whole bunch of watercolor portrait sketches by Marco Corona

Belligerent Piano - Tim Lane

• This week's Belligerent Piano by Tim Lane introduces a new character

detail - Jim Flora

• Mid-1950s magazine and record cover details by Jim Flora

Keep Smurf Alive - Johnny Ryan

• New Johnny Ryan art for sale on Comic Art Collective's recent additions page

chickadee - Debbie Drechsler

• New bird sketches by Debbie Drechsler here, here and here

Girl in Orange Stripes - Mark Kalesniko

• "Girl in Orange Stripes" by Mark Kalesniko

Noah Van Sciver Hates All Ghosts

• From Noah Van Sciver, a "homeless comic" and some old Blammo pages

Druid Bunny - Josh Simmons

• From Josh Simmons & Co., numerous Quackers and Randy Gander updates

giant blind worm - Renee French

• From Renee French: bird, dog, iPhone sketch (?), worm, woolyman, bird

Bush - Steve Brodner

• From Steve Brodner, birthday greetings to Calvin Coolidge & George W. Bush, plus Yankee Stadium sketches

things to consider - Anders Nilsen

• A few more things to consider from Anders Nilsen

Ectopiary page 31 - Hans Rickheit

Page 31 of Hans Rickheit's Ectopiary; also, this is NSFW

Fantastic Four - Robert Goodin

Robert Goodin draws the Fantastic Four — more please!

As a father... - Derek Van Gieson

• A bunch of new drawings by Derek Van Gieson

Truth Serum - Jon Adams

• This week's Truth Serum by Jon Adams

Mome Vol. 19: Summer 2010 - Previews, Pre-Order
Written by Mike Baehr | Filed under videoTim LaneT Edward BakRobert GoodinpreviewsOlivier Schrauwennew releasesMomeJosh SimmonsGilbert HernandezDJ BryantConor OKeefe 24 Jun 2010 3:06 PM

Mome Vol. 19 - Summer 2010 by various artists (cover by Josh Simmons)

Mome Vol. 19 - Summer 2010
by various artists; edited by Eric Reynolds

128-page color/b&w 7" x 9" softcover • $14.99
ISBN: 978-1-60699-349-1

Ships in: June/July 2010 (subject to change) — Pre-Order Now

The acclaimed anthology of contemporary comics steams toward its landmark 20th issue. This issue leads off with the cover story, the first part of the satiric psychedelic epic "The White Rhinoceros," drawn by Josh Simmons and written by The Partridge in the Pear Tree. It is our privilege to welcome the great Gilbert Hernandez to the pages of Mome with a brand-new story starring his beloved character Roy! Also debuting this issue, exciting newcomer D.J. Bryant, with what may be the most hard-boiled story to appear in Mome yet. And making return appearances: Olivier Schrauwen, Tim Lane, Conor O'Keefe, and Robert Goodin with new stories, and T. Edward Bak with the continuation of his epic "Wild Man" serial.

Download an EXCLUSIVE 9-page PDF excerpt (1.6 MB) with a page from every artist in the issue, plus the Table of Contents.

Video & Photo Slideshow Preview (view in new window):



Diaflogue: Cathy Malkasian exclusive Q&A
Written by Mike Baehr | Filed under Robert GoodinDiaflogueCathy Malkasian 17 Jun 2010 7:29 AM

Temperance by Cathy Malkasian

We're very pleased to present this interview with Cathy Malkasian conducted by contributing Mome cartoonist Robert Goodin. We typically have Fantagraphics staff members conduct these "Diaflogue" interviews, but when assigning an interviewer to talk to Cathy, I couldn't think of anyone better than Rob, who has known Cathy for years and published her first minicomics under his Robot Publishing banner. I was thrilled when Rob and Cathy agreed to have this conversation.

Robert Goodin: I think you had a bit of an unusual path to comics.  Why don't you tell us about your background like education and your main profession. 

Cathy Malkasian: The wonder of mixing words with pictures started in kindergarten. We were given the task of doing little booklets depicting some event in our lives. We drew the pictures and the teacher or our parents would take our dictation for the story, writing words where there was room. The combination of words and pictures, bound in a stable form, really excited me. I can only describe this feeling as joy.   

Decades later, when I started doing comics, that same joy came back, remarkably unpolluted! 

My interests were so varied growing up, but they always centered around the study of character.  I could have learned any subject well if there were compelling characters involved.

The school system back then was geared toward verbal and pattern-based/logical/verbal thinkers. Kinesthetic and character-based thinkers had to make our own way. I wish that higher math had been taught with characters, since it is so much about relationships and solving for unknowns. These can all be translated into character gestalts, involving emotion and even comedy in a way that makes abstract ideas stick.

I processed and translated experience in terms of character, either taking on the qualities of other people, or assigning characters to abstract ideas or words, such as the days of the week. Character created relevance. 

So whether I was studying acting or music history, opera or eventually working in animation, I was always interested in characters and how they interacted and thought. Directing and storyboarding for animation was a very exciting experience, because never before had I the opportunity to see characters I'd drawn come alive in other people's hands! It was fantastic! A great way to connect with great artists. But the strictures of children's TV writing kept the stories from getting deeper, so comics seemed like the next logical step. Comics allowed for that gestalt experience, getting characters and their context to represent philosophical, ethical and emotional states.

from  Pater Contrarious - Cathy Malkasian

RG: You've certainly got some abstract ideas attached to character in Temperance. There is a good balance between characters representing ideas, but also being real people (at least with Minerva and Lester, less so with Pa and Peggy). How did these characters come together in your mind? Did you begin the book with large ideas that you wanted to wrestle with or did you start with characters that these ideas glommed onto? 

CM: I started with the idea of war and how it may be the larger expression of our struggle with entropy. Let's face it: nobody is a fan of decay!! Who wants to slide into chaos and emerge transformed? Even though that's the way of things it's too scary to contemplate! We all want to take our minds off this stuff, but it's there in the background. So we have to deal with it consciously or unconsciously. This story is all about entropy and synthesis; the two sides of change, the dual nature of everything. Of these two constants, entropy (and its psychological counterpart oblivion) gets most of our attention, paradoxically because we don't like facing it head-on. Look at our culture now: we hate decay as much we glorify it. Our pervasive way of dealing with it, of beating it to the punch, is violence. We glorify violence because it is entropy under the illusion of our control. 

I looked at violence as our sped-up version of entropy, our way of fooling ourselves into overcoming nature. If we can just destroy things, we will somehow live, conquering nature. If we can harness what nature does, we won't have to succumb to it. Tearing things down, blowing them up, gives us the temporary illusion that we stand over and apart from the forces that shape us. War is the most absurd expression of this illusion.  

So I wondered: how would I personify not just this force of entropy, but our deeply uneasy feelings about it? How would this force look to us on an emotional and ethical level? We often judge our own decay as cruel and unrelenting. It seems like a form of self-hatred. So I had to make the Pa character not just driven at every moment to do his destructive work, but to hate himself and everything around him. His "job" as this force is to keep going until even he is destroyed. But of course that's impossible, and he knows it, so he's in torment all the time. He can't enjoy the game he's a part of. Still, with his all histrionics he seems impressive and all-powerful.

On the flip side, everything that seems gentle, receptive and creative is still seen as weak in our mass culture. While we judge entropy harshly we often ignore synthesis/creation. This force, which Peggy represents, is very subtle much of the time. Peggy is in the background, in everything. Her influence is practically invisible so it's easy to forget her. She goes about her business more slowly. To personify her would involve a sense of knowing, kindness, compassion and, of course, love. Sadly these qualities still get punished in our popular culture. So Peggy must work "underground," just as the sustaining core of any culture must plan for rebuilding even while the fires rage above.

from Temperance - Cathy Malkasian

RG: Yeah, I’m picking up what you are laying down. Why is it that destroyers always trump creators? I guess it’s just much easier to destroy something than to create. I always think about how a given population only needs a small percentage of their number bent on destruction to make the society absolute hell. How many terrorists does it take, or corrupt government officials, or faulty oil rigs? It can seem like a lost cause. Your book ends on a note of hope. Are you completely full of shit? 

CM: Destroyers are generally more seductive than creators because bonding via primitive instincts is easy, immediate and addictive. Destruction generally requires less skill and time than creation (even a three-year-old can start a forest fire), so any spectator can say "Hey, I can do that!” Creators, on the other hand, are methodical and patient, representing the more executive functions in the brain. They can seem more intimidating, since they don’t have that immediate bond with our simple instincts. Can you think of many people in our popular culture who are admired for their patience and persistence? False, fast power is always more impressive to more people, especially people who haven’t developed their skills at patience and methodical thinking, or who live primarily in their instinct-based emotions.

Another reason the destructive minority grabs influence is that we are transfixed by our own awe at destruction, at seeing natural forces hijacked in the form of grand spectacle. I have a hunch that our fascination with destruction is an outgrowth of our neurological need for contrasts and patterns. We need to find patterns and disrupt them, to keep our brains awake. And we are fascinated at our own fascination, too. Humans can't seem to get enough of ourselves…

Big disturbances, for good or for ill, really wake us up, sending ripples through the wider cultural mind.

The end of the book is a tableau of a cycle coming around again. Whether or not it’s hopeful is up to the reader! 

RG: Since we are on the topic of patience and creating, I wanted to talk to you about comic making. You’ve been making your living in animation and have been drawing storyboards for many years. While there are some skills that translate well into comics, comics still have aspects that do not have any overlap (like designing a page to work as a whole, placing blacks and whites, and a nice, finished drawing). Did you find it difficult to make that transition? Was there anyone you looked at when (or if) you felt a little shaky? 

CM: I’m really driven by story and character, and this applies to both media. It’s a pretty intuitive process, waiting to “see” the next scene or panel once I am emotionally involved. As far as page design goes, a lot of my visual instincts come from doing paintings. I don’t paint often, but when I do it’s a quite a challenging exercise of balancing all those things you mentioned. More than producing a nice finished drawing, I want to get into the scene. Once the scene feels “real” the drawing is finished. It’s great looking at other people’s work, and their influence sinks in, but I don’t usually analyze it. Getting too analytical takes all the fun away! 

RG: I know what you mean. There is also the phrase, “Paralysis by analysis” that can creep in too. At some point you have to trust your instincts. However, you appear to be blessed in that good artistic decisions seem to come naturally to you, where I need years of studying and practice to put things together. 

CM: Well, what may appear to you as good instincts is really the end product of hitting a lot of intellectual and creative brick walls. I always do a mountain of preparation then get frustrated and give up, at least until my brain airs out. At that point all you can do is let go and trust that all the research and notes and sketches will sort themselves out. So however you slice it, we're both putting in years of study and practice. And, by the way, your work just gets more and more stunning. 

Little Miss Mess - Cathy  Malkasian

RG: Now that you have two graphic novels out in 3 years, what’s next? Are you going to do another big book or do you want to try something shorter? Do you have any interest in reprinting some of your short stories?

CM: I am so ready to do a comedy now! And shorter books, too! It'd be good to see what Percy Gloom is up to — he'd be a great little guy to work with again. I also have this novella I wrote that needs some spot drawings and paintings, so that'll be fun, too.  There's a mini-comic I did a while back called "Little Miss Mess" about a couple of incognito space aliens.  I really like the main characters and wouldn't mind continuing their adventures.  So ideas are rolling around in the old noggin. I just need to find out which one is shouting the loudest.





Comix at the Silver Lake Jubilee
Written by Mike Baehr | Filed under Tim HensleyTed StearnRobert GoodineventsEsther Pearl Watson 17 May 2010 5:12 PM

Silver Lake Jubilee

This coming weekend, May 22-23, 2010, the Silver Lake Jubilee in Los Angeles is hosting "Jubilee Comix," a comics showcase featuring live readings at El Cid both mornings beginning at 10am featuring Tom Neely, Robert Goodin, Jesse Moynihan, Ted Stearn, David King and Malachi Ward. Afterward, all of them, plus Tim Hensley and Olga Volozova, will be signing in the Literary Village. And Esther Pearl Watson is just one of many comics and small-press artists exhibiting in the "We Come in Peace" collaborative "zine fort" installation. Sounds like a can't-miss!