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Category >> Roy Crane

Buz Sawyer Vol. 3: Typhoons and Honeymoons by Roy Crane - Excerpt
Written by Mike Baehr | Filed under Roy CranepreviewsComing Attractions 21 Jan 2014 12:24 PM

Buz is back for another volume of romance and adventure! Buz Sawyer Vol. 3: Typhoons and Honeymoons collects two more years of Roy Crane's masterful strip, from 1947-1948.

In our downloadable excerpt, Buz reluctantly skips out on his vacation and heads to the West Indies to help his old Navy buddy Thirsty out of a jam — which turns out to be an acute case of cold feet over impending marriage. Thirsty sends Buz to let his bride-to-be down easy, but it turns out his real plans are more devious, and things get complicated. On top of all that, a hurricane blows through and a slick character washes up with designs on Thirsty's now-disenchanted belle. Plus, a few full-color Sunday strips starring Buz's pal Rosco Sweeney! Will Thirsty get the girl? And what about Buz's girl Christy back home? Pre-order the book now and find out when you get your copy in March!

Buz Sawyer Vol. 3: Typhoons and Honeymoons by Roy Crane

New Comics Day 12.4.13
Written by Jen Vaughn | Filed under Roy CraneNew Comics DayJulia GfrörerJesse ReklawEC ComicsCaptain Easy 6 Dec 2013 11:12 AM

This week's comic shop shipment included the following new titles. Read on to see what comics-blog commentators and web-savvy comic shops are saying about them (more to be added as they appear), check out our previews at the links, and contact your local shop to confirm availability.

Black is the Color  

Black is the Color 
by Julia Gfrörer

72-page black & white 6" x 9" softcover • $14.99
ISBN: 978-1-60699-717-8

"Beautiful. Gfrörer has a light touch in finding the yearning and humor amongst life's hard luck and even harder truths. A genuinely romantic and sensitive book." –Sammy Harkham 

"Gfrörer's most moving comic to date, Black Is the Color eroticizes suffering not to glamorize it, but to endure it. We're adrift; what other choice do we have?" –Sean T. Collins, The Comics Journal

"This is Julia Gfrorer's fine-looking work, very idiosyncratically told in a way that makes you love cartoonists that take those opportunities and run with them." –Tom Spurgeon, Comics Reporter

Couch Tag  

Couch Tag  
by Jesse Reklaw

176-page monochrome/color 6.25" x 9.25" hardcover • $26.99
ISBN: 978-1-60699-676-8

"[A] family's evolution springs from the stories and the dialogue. Clever, moving and often hilarious." –Houston Chronicle 

"…it's another work in a very strong year for Reklaw that included the short he did for Robyn Chapman. An autobiographical tale that gets increasingly unhinged, Reklaw's work also reminded me of some of the emotionally infused alt-manga I read this year: a really unique comics-reading experience." –Tom Spurgeon, Comics Reporter 

There's a lot of energy hidden, pent up, in Reklaw's older normal "square" cartooning style, and it's starting to bust out and become unpredictable, more like he is in person." –Kevin Huizenga

The EC Artists  

The Comics Journal Library Vol. 8: The EC Artists
edited by Michael Dean

240-page black & white/color 10" x 12" softcover • $28.99
ISBN: 978-1-60699-608-9

A lot of those folks were very thoughtful artists, and this TCJ generated book can take you into what many of them were thinking." –Tom Spurgeon, Comics Reporter 

Captain Easy 4

Captain Easy, Soldier of Fortune: The Complete Sunday Newspaper Strips Vol. 4 (1941-1943) 
by Roy Crane

144-page full-color 10.5" x 14.75" hardcover • $49.99
ISBN: 978-1-60699-698-0

"It's easy to toss around the word 'genius,' especially when it comes to comics. We all have our favorites and we all like to think ours are the great ones. But one look at Roy Crane's work and anyone can see that he definitely was worthy of the 'genius' tag." - Tom Mason, Comix 411  

"Crane's art is stunning, combining simple cartoony figures with richly detailed backgrounds in clever, colorful layouts. It isn't even necessary to read the dialogue or captions to follow the action; just scan Crane's dynamic lines, which make every panel look like a unique work of pop art. [Grade:] A-." –The A.V. Club 







Captain Easy, Soldier of Fortune Vol. 4 (1940-1943) by Roy Crane - Now in Stock
Written by Mike Baehr | Filed under Roy Cranenew releasesCaptain Easy 25 Nov 2013 6:55 PM

Just arrived and shipping now from our mail-order department:

Captain Easy, Soldier of Fortune Vol. 4 (1940-1943) by Roy Crane

Captain Easy, Soldier of Fortune: The Complete Sunday Newspaper Strips Vol. 4 (1941-1943)
by Roy Crane

144-page full-color 10.5" x 14.75" hardcover • $49.99
ISBN: 978-1-60699-698-0

See Previews / Order Now

In the fourth volume of Fantagraphics' Captain Easy series, our eponymous hero and his loyal sidekick Wash Tubbs answer a newspaper ad that they don’t know is years out of date, and wind up stranded in Guatemala with a busted landing gear and only five dollars to their name. Whoops! They need all their wits and ingenuity to get them out of this fix. Which they manage to do by the skin of their teeth, only to stumble onto a lost city in the jungle. Lost cities in the jungle are never good news, and so it is with our two boisterous heroes. Against all odds, they extricate themselves from this dastardly peril and head for home on a ship carrying tigers (Roy Crane loved to draw tigers). They’re out of danger, right? Wrong! What kind of a Captain Easy adventure would this be without our boys getting stranded on a desert island and encountering the beautiful but savage Wolf Girl (Crane loved to draw Wolf Girls!)?

Don’t miss the last volume of Fantagraphics' glorious reprint of Roy Crane's full color Captain Easy Sunday pages.

Captain Easy, Soldier of Fortune Vol. 4 (1940-1943) by Roy Crane - Photoset Preview
Written by Mike Baehr | Filed under Roy Cranepreviewsnew releasesCaptain Easy 25 Nov 2013 5:11 PM

"Crane’s work is sheer energy." – Art Spiegelman

“Crane’s art is stunning, combining simple cartoony figures with richly detailed backgrounds in clever, colorful layouts. It isn’t even necessary to read the dialogue or captions to follow the action; just scan Crane’s dynamic lines, which make every panel look like a unique work of pop art. [Grade:] A-.” – The A.V. Club

"Though he was one of the genre’s pioneers, Roy Crane’s Captain Easy is arguably the most idiosyncratic of all the adventure strips. But it’s this blend of loud slapstick, young-boys-styled adventure and blatant sex appeal that make Captain Easy such a winning, fun strip to read." – Robot 6

"...[O]ne of comics' purest entertainments... Combining cartoony figure drawing and considerable humor with rousing adventure, Captain Easy, Soldier of Fortune: The Complete Sunday Newspaper Strips... exceeds even Steven Spielberg's Indiana Jones films in exuberant action and breathless pace." – St. Louis Post-Dispatch

Captain Easy, Soldier of Fortune: The Complete Sunday Newspaper Strips Vol. 4 (1941-1943)
by Roy Crane

144-page full-color 10.5" x 14.75" hardcover • $49.99
ISBN: 978-1-60699-698-0

Available now! Click the thumbnails for larger versions; get more info, see more previews and order your copy here:

http://www.fantagraphics.com/captaineasy4

Captain Easy, Soldier of Fortune Vol. 4 (1940-1943) by Roy Crane - Video/Photo Slideshow Preview
Written by Mike Baehr | Filed under videoRoy Cranepreviewsnew releasesCaptain Easy 22 Nov 2013 5:53 PM

Captain Easy, Soldier of Fortune: The Complete Sunday Newspaper Strips Vol. 4 (1941-1943)
by Roy Crane

144-page full-color 10.5" x 14.75" hardcover • $49.99
ISBN: 978-1-60699-698-0

Ships starting next week! — Pre-Order Now

In the fourth volume of Fantagraphics' Captain Easy series, our eponymous hero and his loyal sidekick Wash Tubbs answer a newspaper ad that they don’t know is years out of date, and wind up stranded in Guatemala with a busted landing gear and only five dollars to their name. Whoops! They need all their wits and ingenuity to get them out of this fix. Which they manage to do by the skin of their teeth, only to stumble onto a lost city in the jungle. Lost cities in the jungle are never good news, and so it is with our two boisterous heroes. Against all odds, they extricate themselves from this dastardly peril and head for home on a ship carrying tigers (Roy Crane loved to draw tigers). They’re out of danger, right? Wrong! What kind of a Captain Easy adventure would this be without our boys getting stranded on a desert island and encountering the beautiful but savage Wolf Girl (Crane loved to draw Wolf Girls!)?

Don’t miss the last volume of Fantagraphics' glorious reprint of Roy Crane's full color Captain Easy Sunday pages.

View Video & Photo Slideshow Preview in New Window

Captain Easy Vol. 4 cover photo

Captain Easy, Soldier of Fortune Vol. 4 (1940-1943) by Roy Crane - Excerpt
Written by Mike Baehr | Filed under Roy CranepreviewsComing AttractionsCaptain Easy 9 Oct 2013 12:27 PM

The fourth and final volume of Roy Crane's Captain Easy Sunday strips is on the way for release in late November/early December, and we're pleased to present this downloadable teaser excerpt for your reading pleasure.

In these 10 strips, our heroes Easy and his best chum Wash Tubbs are reunited with their old friend Lulu Belle, take off for Guatemala on a bum job lead, and fall in with some shady characters led by the baddest bandit in all of Central America... who happens to be a "saucy and cute" girl, of course! "You betcher pink panties there's gunner be trouble!"

Pre-order your copy today, or get the whole 4-volume series at a swell discount!

Captain Easy, Soldier of Fortune Vol. 4 (1940-1943) by Roy Crane

Captain Easy, Soldier of Fortune Vol. 4 (1941-1943) by Roy Crane - First Look
Written by Mike Baehr | Filed under Roy CraneComing AttractionsCaptain Easy 2 Oct 2013 6:06 PM

Captain Easy Vol. 4 cover photo

Captain Easy Vol. 4 pages photo

Easy & Tubbs are back for one last collection of colorful Sunday strips by Roy Crane in our series of oversized hardcovers cleverly designed to resemble a giant travel journal. Adventure and slapstick, fisticuffs and foolishness, cute women and ugly men, exotic settings and funny sound effects, and yes, there's tigers — Captain Easy, Soldier of Fortune Vol. 4 has it all and it's all pure fun.

Our advance copies are still fresh off the delivery truck, and the main shipment should be arriving around Black Friday, so get ready to bludgeon the other shoppers to get your copy — lickety-whop! — or avoid that mishegas altogether and pre-order right now. (You can also get the complete 4-volume set at a nice discount.)

Eisner Awards Nominations
Written by Jen Vaughn | Filed under Walt KellyThe Comics JournalSpain RodriguezspainRoy CraneRick MarschallMichel GagneMichael KuppermanLove and RocketsLos Bros HernandezLorenzo MattottiLilli CarréKim ThompsonJustin HallJohnny GruelleJasonJaime HernandezJacques TardiGilbert HernandezGary PanterGary GrothDisneyCarol TylerCarl BarksCaptain Easyawards 6 May 2013 4:47 PM

Beauty and the Beasts

We love all of our books but are especially happy for the creators of the Eisner-nominated books. You can vote until June 12 online. If you haven't read all of them, check 'em out individually or via our list!

Best Short Story: "Moon 1969: The True Story of the 1969 Moon Launch," by Michael Kupperman, in Tales Designed to Thrizzle #8

"Rainbow Moment," by Lilli Carré, in Heads or Tails

Best Single Issue (or One-Shot): Tales Designed to Thrizzle #8, by Michael Kupperman

Best Humor Publication: Naked Cartoonists, edited by Gary Groth

Best Anthology: No Straight Lines: Four Decades of Queer Comics, edited by Justin Hall

Best Reality-Based Work: You'll Never Know, Book 3: A Soldier's Heart, by C. Tyler

Best Graphic Album-New: You'll Never Know, Book 3: A Soldier's Heart, by C. Tyler

Best Graphic Album-Reprint: Cruisin' with the Hound, by Spain

Heads or Tails, by Lilli Carré

Best Archival Collection/Project-Strips: Mister Twee Deedle: Raggedy Ann's Sprightly Cousin, by Johnny Gruelle, edited by Rick Marschall

Pogo, Vol. 2: Bona Fide Balderdash, by Walt Kelly, edited by Carolyn Kelly and Kim Thompson

Roy Crane's Captain Easy: The Complete Sunday Newspaper Strips, vol. 3, edited by Rick Norwood

Eisner spines

Best Archival Collection/Project-Comic Books: Walt Disney's Uncle Scrooge: Only a Poor Old Man, by Carl Barks, edited by Gary Groth

Young Romance: The Best of Simon & Kirby's Romance Comics, edited by Michel Gagné

Best U.S. Edition of International Material: Athos in America, by Jason

New York Mon Amour, by Benjamin LeGrand, Dominique Grange, and Jacques Tardi

Best Writer/Artist: Gilbert Hernandez, Love and Rockets New Stories, vol. 5

Jaime Hernandez, Love and Rockets New Stories, vol. 5

C. Tyler, You'll Never Know, Book 3: A Soldier's Heart

Best Painter/Multimedia Artist (interior art): Lorenzo Mattotti, The Crackle of the Frost

Best Lettering: C. Tyler, You'll Never Know, Book 3: A Soldier's Heart

Best Comics-Related Periodical/Journalism: tcj.com, edited by Timothy Hodler and Dan Nadel

Best Publication Design: Dal Tokyo, designed by Gary Panter and Family Sohn

Mister Twee Deedle: Raggedy Ann's Sprightly Cousin, designed by Tony Ong

Still no sure which to read? Heidi MacDonald, Cal Reid and company discuss the nominations on the Publishers Weekly podcast. Meanwhile, Chris Sims, Matt D. Wilson and more of War Rocket Ajax discuss the nominations, although I'm not sure how long the podcast will be up at this link. 

Some of the nominations gather in our mail room. See you in JULY!

Eisner Nominations

 

Daily OCD 3/22/13
Written by Jen Vaughn | Filed under The Comics JournalSpain RodriguezspainRoy CraneRobert CrumbPeter BaggePaul NelsonNoah Van SciverMoto HagioMort MeskinMichael KuppermanLinda MedleyKim ThompsonKevin AveryJulia GfrörerJanet HamlinJaime HernandezJack JacksonGuy PeellaertGeorge HerrimanGary GrothEd PiskorDaily OCDcomics journalChuck ForsmanChris WrightB KrigsteinAlexander Theroux 22 Mar 2013 3:45 PM

The longest, unabridged edition of Online Commentaries & Diversions:

Tales Designed to Thrizzle Volume Two

• Review: The Village Voice is almost hospitalized while reading Michael Kupperman's Tales Designed to Thrizzle Vol. 2. "Kupperman heaps absurdity upon absurdity…The result is a jubilant rococo, the strips all thrilling ornamentation…No exaggeration: I coughed hot soup out of my nose while reading the new hardbound volume of deadpan dadaist Michael Kupperman" states Alan Scherstuhl.

• Review: Comic Book Resources looks at Tales Designed to Thrizzle Vol. 2 by Michael Kupperman. Brian Cronin loves the Moon 69 story. "The devolution of the ads as the story continues might be my favorite part…The second collection of Kupperman’s individual Thrizzle issues JUST came out and it includes [Moon 69]! So go buy it, dammit!"

• Review: Tales Designed to Thrizzle Vol. 2 by Michael Kupperman shines at The AV Club. "Kupperman's work only gets funnier when read in bulk... Kupperman's comics take pre-existing popular culture-TV shows, advertising, other comics-and tweak them just a little until they become hilariously absurd," states Noel Murray.

• Plug: Time Out New York analyzes Tales Designed to Thrizzle Vol. 2 with one interactive panel. Cool!

The Comics Journal #302

• Review: Glen Weldon reviews The Comics Journal #302 on New Republic, exclusively the Maurice Sendak interview conducted by Gary Groth. "Why on earth would I want to read 100 pages of caustic carping? Because Sendak is funny.  Deeply, passionately so. Read in full, Sendak’s zingers lose their venom and evince a sincere and surprising warmth. He comes off as bitter, but not embittered—a fine distinction, perhaps, but a real one."

• Plug (video): Mark Judge made a music video for TCJ #302. Trust me, you'll want to see this.

• Plug: USA Today's Pop Candy mentions TCJ #302. "This week I've been reading the wonderful (and massive) issue No. 302, which contains a huge Maurice Sendak tribute as well as his final interview"

• Revew: Chris Estey of KEXP writes on some of our new titles like The Comics Journal #302, edited by Gary Groth, Kristy Valenti and Michael Dean. "Probably my favorite single issue magazine of 2013, it is actually a freakily-elevated edition of the long-running only-trustable trade magazine devoted to comics…it gives us a chance to sample the gamut of an ever-evolving and surprisingly inspiring art-form."

The Grammar of Rock

• Revew: Chris Estey of KEXP reviews our newest book of music criticism The Grammar of Rock by Alexander Theroux. "Ripping through this hilarious rage on banality and unexpected pleasures I thought, they don’t make writers like this anymore…Drop that boring band biography and fetch this, if only for the mountains of lists of rarely-heard missing gems he has sampled and tasted beforehand for you."

• Review: Pop Matters has to tune into The Grammar of Rock by Alexander Theroux. John L. Murphy writes, "Naturally, the fun of The Grammar of Rock lies in its acerbic prose as well as its aesthetic insight…You’ll either laugh or you won’t. I laughed."

• Review: Washington Independent Review of Books also looks at Alexander Theroux's The Grammar of Rock. "Reading Alexander Theroux’s The Grammar of Rock is like hitching a ride with a suspiciously awake truck driver who talks endlessly for hours…All in all, this book is a very cold love letter," says DJ Randy Cepuch.

Sketching Guantanamo

• Plug: Wired runs 10 sketches by Janet Hamlin featured in her upcoming book, Sketching Guantanamo. Hamlin remembers sketching Khalid Sheikh Mohammed, "He would turn and pose — a deliberate turn, facing me, holding very steady." 

Julio's Day

• Review: Julio's Day by Gilbert Hernandez gets reviewed on on The AV Club. "Julio's Day(Fantagraphics) is as much about what's not on the page as what is...Fashions, mores, and technologies change; but desires and disappointments do not," writes Noel Murray.

Los Tejanos and Lost Cause

• Review: Nerds of a Feather give an outstanding rating and review a recent reprint of Jack Jackson's work. Philippe Duhart writes, "Los Tejanos and Lost Cause are the products of serious historical research, and as such they are clear exhibitions of comics' potential as a viable media for academic and journalistic work…I appreciate that Johnson sticks with the perspective of the “losers” -- Juan Seguin's struggles against racism following Texas’ rebellion and Texan Confederates' struggle to regain a sense of honor following the defeat of their cause."

Castle Waiting Vol. 1

• Review: Fingers on Blast reads Linda Medley's Castle Waiting Vol. 1. "The tales weave their way together seamlessly thanks to Medley's art.  There is no simple way to describe it, but to say it draws you ever deeper into the story."

Peter Bagge's Other Stuff

• Revew: Chris Estey of KEXP writes on some of our new titles Peter Bagge's Other Stuff which" features Bagge doing some sharp-witted journalism (on comedy festivals, especially) and historical stories…it is an electric, howlingly funny, bona-fide classic mangle of manic music history, prickly satire, and perfectly rendered cartooning."

The Heart of Thomas The Adventures of Jodelle   

• Review: Novi Magazine picks apart feminist storytelling in Moto Hagio's The Heart of Thomas. "While Thomas depicts male characters, Hagio codes femininity into every element of the story, with every effort towards drawing in her assumedly female audience…" writes Dan Morrill.
 
•Review: BookDragon plugs The Heart of Thomas by Moto Hagio. "…it’s certainly proved its lasting effects. Never mind the rockets, sometimes turbulent feelings can take you much, much further…" writes Terry Hong.
 
• Plug: Comics Forge is looking foward to The Adventures of Jodelle by Guy Peellaert as much as we are! "This was one of the trend setting 1960’s comics that you will see echoed worldwide during that time and when this style of pop art was raging as the most important thing since sex was invented…It looks like it is going to be a beautiful book, like most of the books that Fantagraphics puts out, you can feel the love."

Buz Sawyer: Vol. 2 Out of the Shadows

• Review: Scoop covers Buz Sawyer Vol. 2: Sultry's Tiger by Roy Crane in one hell of a history lesson on newspaper and adventure comics. "Buz Sawyer may be the peak of the adventure strip as a genre…Crane’s ability to walk a fine line between hyper-realism while still incorporating an easy to read and understand style places him among the greats in comic history," says Mark Squirek. 

• Review: Scoop covers Mort Meskin's Out of the Shadows. "He is so skilled at body language that without reading a single word you can see the kid’s enthusiasm for his grandfather’s story grow across the first three panels," writes Mark Squirek.

Beta Testing the Apocalypse The Hypo Black Lung

• Interview: Comic Book Resources and Alex Dueben interview Tom Kacyznski about his books. Kacyznski says, "There's an easy willingness to imagine the collapse of everything instead of small changes in the political system that could fix a lot of the problems that we're having. Those kinds of themes interest me."

• Review: Beta Testing the Apocalypse by Tom Kaczynski gets a look-see on B-Sides & Rarities. Elizabeth Simins writes, "Kaczynski’s style involves a pretty dedicated commitment to setting scenes with lyrical descriptions as much as imagery, which is something I associate with the space between “regular” fiction and comics…You should read it."

• Review: Grovel reviews The Hypo by Noah Van Sciver. "It’s a surprising but fascinating insight into the psyche of a man that outsiders would normally assume to be a sort of political superhuman, but Sciver adds depth and soul to the two-dimensional image of the man with half a beard and a top hat," penned Andy Shaw.

• Review: Comic Pusher enjoys their read of Chris Wright's new book: "In Black Lung Wright presents a world of ceaseless violence and pain, his reflectively brutal cartooning interwoven with elegiac prose, with the very syntax of comic storytelling breaking down under the memory and transformative agony of loss and obsession," says Jeffrey O. Gustafson. 

Everything is an Afterthought Your Vigor for Life Appalls Me  

• Review: Warren Leming over at Logos Journal reviews Everything is an Afterthought: The life and times of Paul Nelson. "Author Kevin Avery has done us a great service in bringing Paul Nelson’s woefully neglected story and life on the music culture scene into focus. This is a book for all those interested in what made 20th Century American music an anthem for the world."

• Plug: Jade at D&Q Bookstore digs into Your Vigor for Life Appalls Me by R. Crumb. "The extraordinary title is only matched by the incredible insight into the iconoclast’s mind and the ultra-snazzy portrait of an early Crumb on the cover, sporting a corduroy jacket and tie… A definite must-read for any Crumb fan."

Black is the Color The End of the Fucking World Hip Hop Family Tree
• Review: The Comics Journal digs Black is the Color by Julia Gfrörer. Sean T. Collins writes, "Gfrörer’s most moving comic to date, Black Is the Color eroticizes suffering not to glamorize it, but to endure it."

• Interview: Robin McConnell interviews Julia Gfrörer about her webcomic and soon-to-be-in-print book, Black is the Color on Inkstuds.

• Review: Comics Bulletin loves Charles Forsman's The End of the
Fucking World
. Geoffrey Lapid writes "Instead of allowing you to step back and look at James and Alyssa through wistful adult hindsight, Forsman's fluid and subdued linework take us right into those moments that you only understand when you're 17 years-old, proudly oblivious and doomed…James and Alyssa feel like real, substantial characters rather than simple broad strokes alluding to a deeper history."

• Interview: Ed Piskor is interviewed by Jackie Mantey for Columbus Alive during his Ohio art residency and on Hip Hop Family Tree. "The purity of intent is something that’s important to me with anything I come across," Piskor believes. 

Love and Rockets New Stories 5 Cruisin' with the Hound

• Interview: Kelli Korducki interviews Jaime Hernandez on behalf of Hazlitt about Love and Rockets. Jaime answers, "I like the way women react to situations. Guys in a certain situation mostly try to keep it cool, keep their cover, keep things in control. With a lot of women I know, you get eight different reactions to a situation."

• Review: Jon Longhi looks at Spain Rodriguez in Having a Book Moment. Cruisin' with the Hound, a recent collection, is "it's all gang fights, hot rods, teenage mayhem and its wonderfully entertaining and beautifully illustrated."

Messages in a Bottle Krazy and Ignatz

• Plug: Craig Fischer on the Heroes Online Blog now looks at Messages in a Bottle: Comic Book Stories by B. Krisgstein. "Thanks to Sadowski, I’m now crazy for Krigstein."

• Plug: Earth Science Picture of the day is Elephant Feet, Arizona, (shot by Stu Witmer) as seen in the comic pages Krazy Kat by George Herriman

• Plug: Heidi MacDonald over at The Beat enjoyed Tom Spurgeon's interview with Gary Groth. Tom also put up a visit of Fantagraphics in pictures, but you know, didn't include the new office.

• Plug: The LA Times and David Ulin say some touching things after the announcement of Kim's cancer diagnosis. Thank you.

Get in Shape with TCJ 302
Written by Jen Vaughn | Filed under The Comics JournalstaffRoy Craneoffice funmaurice fucking sendakcomics journal 8 Feb 2013 11:37 AM

TCJ 302 workout

So for the next month or so people will tell you all the reasons why you should read The Comics Journal #302. It has the last interview with Maurice Sendak, an amazing How to Draw section with Roy Crane and his ghost artist (it's worth at least one semester of comic book school credit), a tribute to Dylan Williams, an extensive interview with Jacques Tardi, a new Joe Sacco comic, a Percy Crosby examination and so much more. But I'm here to tell you how you could use TCJ 302 to sweat. At 672 pages, this tome is not just a brick of knowledge, it's a heavy-ass brick of knowledge.

I work out

While the matte cover could potentially soak up a lot of sweat, wrist bands and occasionally toweling yourself will keep your TCJ 302 fighting fit. 

TCJ workout   The single arm row is a great workout for your back. Kneeling over a chair or bench, place one knee and hand on it. Hold TCJ 302 in other arm fully extended towards the ground. With your back parallel to the ground, slowly bring the book up to your midsection and then return to the starting position. Remember to keep your back still as you shakily lift up TCJ 302

  Now the triceps are a problem area for most Americans. Standing completely straight, feet planted firmly hip-width apart on the floor, start with your TCJ 302 in your hand extended straight up in the air. Using not gravity or momentum but your own muscles, bend your elbow and slowly bring your forearm behind your head. If you do this move too fast, you might get a papercut on your ear as the pages flip around a bit. Make sure not to move your elbow or upper arm. Then return your arm to the fully extended position. Feel free to place your free hand on your hip or wrap it around your face to cradle your elbow to ensure it doesn't dip down during the rep.

  Now, some of you think you can just read TCJ 302 on the bus or in bed without any training or conditioning. Unless you want a repeat of the late 90s-2000s "Harry Pottered Nose" or to generations before that "Unabridged Les Mis" we suggest you read sitting upright until you've conditioned your forearms to proper reading strength. Be alert and well-hydrated while reading.

Workouts hurt

Now don't think I've forgotten about cardio!  Run your usual one mile, three miles, sprints or what have you, but while holding TCJ 302 and imagining Maurice Sendak's mischievous beasts breathing down your neck. For added horror, run while holding the TCJ 302 above your head.

TCJ 302 beasts

Some of you might be cartoonists yourselves who have a love of history, the craft and critical analysis. Bully for you! This excersize will whip your arm into shape. Strap TCJ 302 onto your drawing arm and work on your 1000 pages of bad comics until the good ones show up (per Dave Sim's advice). Soon you'll be one-arm push upping your way to glorious two-page spreads and switching from nib to brush to tech pen with the greatest of ease.

Cartoonist work out!

Enjoy your workout and enjoy The Comics Journal #302.