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Category >> Spain Rodriguez

Weekly OCD 10.31.2014
Written by Sonia Lei | Filed under ZapVictor MoscosoTony MillionaireSpain RodriguezSimon HanselmannS Clay WilsonRobert WilliamsRobert CrumbRick GriffinreviewsPeanutsOCDMegahexMatt DannerDrew WeingDrew FriedmanCharles M Schulz 31 Oct 2014 3:30 PM

This week's hauntingly spooktacular collection of Online Commentaries and Diversions:

The Complete Zap ComixReview: The Complete Zap Comix

"While the early issues stand as rowdy documents of the 1960s counterculture, Zap was also more. In reinventing the comic book, it set off legal battles and conversations over censorship, brought attention to cartoonists as artists, and set an example for generations of alternative comics creators like Charles Burns, Daniel Clowes, Joe Matt and the Hernandez Brothers." – Dana Jennings, The NY Times

 

The Lonesome Go by Tim LaneReview: The Lonesome Go by Tim Lane

"Lane’s fluency in portraiture, page layout, lettering, and storytelling is on display, as deep contextual details are crammed into tight panels and captions." – Dominic Umile, Hyperallergic

 

Set to Sea [Softcover Ed.] by Drew WeingReview: Set to Sea [Softcover Ed.] by Drew Weing

"A true graphic odyssey which any lover of a dream-life must see, this eternally fresh yet solid entertainment is a genuine 'must read'." – Win Wiacek, Now Read This!

 

Heroes of the Comics: Portraits of the Legends of Comic Books by Drew FriedmanCommentary: Heroes of the Comics: Portraits of the Legends of Comic Books by Drew Friedman

"The portraits are a genuine insight and reflection of the person and their contribution. Special kudos to Drew for his careful research so that the bios are accurate and help to add to the ongoing study of how it all began in comics." – Nicky Wheeler-Nicholson, The Beat

 

Megahex by Simon HanselmannInterview: Megahex by Simon Hanselmann

"He doesn't just draw the funny or sexy moments -- he lets the characters and the readers enjoy and laugh, but then he shows the fallout from some of the characters' actions, depicting them as them scared and desperate, pathetic and troubled. Hanselmann's skill at depicting this range of emotions and exploring those consequences is what makes his work so fascinating and so worth rereading." – Alex Dueben, Comic Book Resources

 

Sock Monkey: Into the Deep Woods by Tony Millionaire and Matt DannerReview: Sock Monkey: Into the Deep Woods by Tony Millionaire and Matt Danner

"Like the very best children’s classics, this is a book that isn’t afraid to confront dark matters and actively embraces fear and sadness amidst the wonders in an effort to craft a better story.

Compelling, beguiling and visually intoxicating, this latest Sock Monkey yarn judiciously leavens discovery with anxiety, heartbreak with gleeful imaginative innocence and terror with bold triumph." – Win Wiacek, Now Read This!

 

Walt Disney's Uncle Scrooge and Donald Duck: Return to Plain Awful by Don RosaPlug: Walt Disney's Uncle Scrooge and Donald Duck: Return to Plain Awful by Don Rosa

"Let me be perfectly clear: The Don Rosa & Carl Barks Duck books are as good as comics get. Period. Nothing surpasses – only matches – the pure imagination, humor, adventure, and heart of these Donald Duck & Uncle Scrooge stories." – Vince Ostrowski, Multiversity Comics

Plug: "Any time a Carl Barks or Don Rosa book of Donald Duck or Uncle Scrooge comics is released, I get all excited. Because they’re great! I’m not kidding! Also good for jaded fans too cool for kids’ comics." – Dan Greenfield, 13th Dimension

 

Waiting for the Great Pumpkin by Charles M. SchulzReview: Waiting for the Great Pumpkin by Charles M. Schulz

"This adorable little collection of strips is the perfect prize for your costume contest. Growing up, you may have gotten to know the Great Pumpkin mainly through the evergreen TV special — but the original strips collected here are both brainier and more emotionally complex than the show." – Etelka Lehoczky, NPR

 

The Comics Journal Library Vol. 9: Zap The Interviews - Excerpt
Written by Sonia Lei | Filed under ZapVictor MoscosoThe Comics JournalSpain RodriguezS Clay WilsonRobert WilliamsRobert CrumbRick GriffinGilbert SheltonGary GrothComing AttractionsBob Levin 14 Oct 2014 11:00 AM

We've got a tasty tidbit for you this morning as we barrel onward towards the imminent release of All Things Zap. This 19-page downloadable excerpt of The Comics Journal Library Vol. 9: Zap The Interviews includes the full introduction by author and The Comics Journal contributor Bob Levin, as well as the first eight pages of a marathon interview with Zap creator Robert Crumb.

A little something to sink your teeth into while waiting for this epic volume's debut in December!

The Comics Journal Library Vol. 9: Zap The Interviews, edited by Michael Dean and Gary Groth - Cover

Zap: The Interviews (The Comics Journal Library Vol. 9) - Cover Uncovered
Written by Sonia Lei | Filed under ZapVictor MoscosoThe Comics JournalSpain RodriguezS Clay WilsonRobert WilliamsRobert CrumbRick GriffinGilbert SheltonGary GrothComing Attractions 10 Oct 2014 11:00 AM

Zap: The Interviews (The Comics Journal Library Vol. 9) - Cover

Can't get enough ZAP in your life?! Not only do we have our limited-edition, single printing five-volume box set of The Complete Zap Comix coming out in November, but we're also preparing companion book and Volume 9 of The Comics Journal LibraryZap: The Interviews, edited by Michael Dean and Gary Groth. This softcover collection holds all of the definitive Comics Journal interviews with the various Zap contributors and is a must-have for any Zap addic—er, fan. We've got the journal cover design here, and we'll have select previews coming soon!

The Complete Zap Comix - First Look
Written by Sonia Lei | Filed under Victor MoscosoSpain RodriguezS Clay WilsonRobert WilliamsRobert CrumbpreviewsGilbert SheltonComing Attractions 1 Oct 2014 8:00 AM

The Complete Zap Comix - Cover

The Complete Zap Comix

The Complete Zap Comix

The Complete Zap Comix

It…It's just beautiful.

And heavy. Loyal ZAP fans, this beast of a box set will surely not disappoint. Our desks are sagging just a little bit under the weight of the very first advance copies, straight from the printer, and we just had to share these sneak peek images with you straightaway!

More previews are imminent, and we'll be posting sample pages from The Complete Zap Comix at its dedicated Facebook page over the next few weeks. This limited edition, one-of-a-kind collection is due to arrive by the end of the year. Pre-ordering yours is just a click away!

The Complete Zap Comix - Excerpt
Written by Sonia Lei | Filed under ZapVictor MoscosoSpain RodriguezS Clay WilsonRobert WilliamsRobert CrumbRick GriffinpreviewsGilbert SheltonComing Attractions 8 Sep 2014 1:00 PM

"The comic that PLUGS you IN!!"

It has been a long time coming, but we have at long last finalized the proofs for the monumental, deluxe five-volume collection that is The Complete Zap Comix. We hope this 60-page, 23.5 MB excerpt, sampling the first dozen or so pages from each book, will temporarily whet your appetites for what's to come.

Now it's full steam ahead with the production of this exquisite, comprehensive book set, and we anticipate it to land in bookstores by late November. It's not too late to start saving up couch coins and spare change in your piggy bank to fund your underground comix habit!

The Complete Zap Comix - Cover

The Complete Zap Comix - Cover Uncovered
Written by Sonia Lei | Filed under ZapVictor MoscosoSpain RodriguezS Clay WilsonRobert WilliamsRobert CrumbRick GriffinGilbert SheltonComing Attractions 1 Aug 2014 9:00 AM

The Complete Zap Comix - 3D

The Complete Zap Comix - Cover

This deluxe, lovingly-designed slipcase is for The Complete Zap Comix, and we are incredibly excited to be able to show you this first glimpse of what the final product will look like. The comprehensive collection will include every single issue and cover of Zap produced, as well as the unpublished 17th issue and the mini comic jam Zam—a deservedly luxurious homage to the vanguard of underground comics artists of our time.

Keep your eyeballs peeled for more updates and previews in the coming weeks. We anticipate this set to be in stores by October. For now, the pre-sale is finally set up and ready to take your order!

Brooklyn: Scott Eder Gallery "It's About Comics" Reception and Show
Written by Anna Pederson | Filed under Tony MillionaireSpain RodriguezRichard SalaPeter BaggeOriginal ArtKim DeitchJim WoodringJaime HernandezGilbert HernandezeventsBasil Wolvertonart shows 3 Jun 2014 11:02 AM

its about comics

 

The Scott Eder Gallery is one of the premier sellars of comic book art, and is the only gallery in New York City that is exclusively dedicated to showcasing and championing the art of comic books. So it's no surprise that when they open a new show, half of the talent on their roster include Fantagraphics artists.

Opening in tandem with the first ever New York Special Edition convention, the Scott Eder Gallery put together an anthological show to highlight their favorite selections over the past six years, and surprise premieres. Of the numerous masters being exhibited, there are a slew of Fantagraphics favorites and crowd pleasers, including:

Peter BaggeRobert CrumbJim Woodring (featured on the flyer), Basil WolvertonJaime HernandezGilbert HernandezTony MillionaireSpain RodriguezKim Deitch, and Richard Sala (also a flyer feature).

So if you're already in New York, or flying out for the first annual comic creator centered show, NY Special Edition, add this show of continuously jaw-dropping original art to your list of places and events to hit up while you're in town! 

Opening reception and party takes place on Friday, June 13th at 6 pm, gallery show runs until Septemeber 5th. Books, prints, and original art available for purchase!

Scott Eder Gallery

18 Bridge St.

Brooklyn, NY

www.scottedergallery.com 

 

Stumptown Photos
Written by Jen Vaughn | Filed under Ulli LustTom KaczynskiSpain RodriguezPatrick RosenkranzLove and RocketsJulia GfrörerinternsGilbert HernandezDash Shaw 8 May 2013 11:28 AM

New School everywhere

Holy comicsolly! Here's photos from the Stumptown Comics Fest in Portland, OR. Dash Shaw was in attendance with New School, which flew off the table. WHY THE WAIT on pictures? We forgot our own con rules. To remain human you must 5-2-1-I: At least 5 hours of sleep, 2 meals a day, 1 shower and Ibuprofen at night. Four hours of sleep one night wrecked this gal and boy, did she pay for it.

Lots of our Fantastaff came to the show since it was so close! Me, Designer Emory Liu, PR Director Jacq Cohen, Dash and Office Manager Steph Rivers.

Fanta Staff

Table service: Dash Shaw signs the fore pages of Bottomless Belly Button

Stumptown Dash Shaw

Patrick Rosenkranz held some long, lovely conversations with fans of comics history and his book Rebel Visions. Patrick also led a Spain Rodriguez tribute panel, if you can ever take a class by him bring a recorder!

Patrick Rosenkranz

Dash talks to fans, cartoonists and the awesome Ming Doyle (who is both).

Ming and Dash

Obligatory "WE LOVE THESE BOOKS" shot, I'm holdin' Julio's Day by Gilbert Hernandez, Jacq is rockin' Ulli Lust's Today is the Last Day of the Rest of Your Life.

Stumptown

Talking comics and Fantagraphics with Julia Gfrörer (Black is the Color coming out in September), Patrick Rosenkranz and Dash.

Friends

Jacq sells Love and Rockets.

Jacq and Rockets

This cutie was all about the Carl Barks' Donald Duck and Uncle Scrooge books.

Babies and Barks

Portland is awesome because there are cartoonists everywhere. And by everywhere I mean at bars or restaurants. We ran in to Greg Means, Alec Longstreth and Claire Sanders at the Red Flag on the way to the Top Shelf party.

Portland

Having the warehouse van proved useful driving home slightly drinky cartoonists. James Kochalka, Rachel Foss and Dash Shaw hold court in the back. 

Back of the van

ACCESSORIES. We saw quite a bit. Ed Luce rocked some additional tags.
Ed Luce

Dash signed the Stumptown sketch poster HIS WAY.

Dash poster

Patrick Yurick had the best NEW comics-related tattoo. It even has the Wattersonesque dropped panel borders for that comic beat.

Patrick Yurick

Speaking of PANELS: Dash tickled the audience with this animation and comic panel. He's got comedic timing DOWN.

Dash Shaw

Here I am looking goofy alongside some of the smarter people in comics on a submissions panel: Allison Baker of MonkeyBrain Comics, Jamie S. Rich (talking about old Oni days), Bob Schreck and Sina Grace of Image and Skybound. Panel photo by Glenn Peters.

Stumptown panel

Our Kristy Valenti, Patrick Rosenkranz and Tom Spurgeon gave a beautiful Spain Rodriguez tribute panel. Photo by someone who still rocks a flash.

Spain panel

Book Appreciation! James Kochalka is a Jim Woodring fan!

James Kochalka and Jim Woodring

Karl Stevens ooohhs and aaaahhs over Dash Shaw's New School.

Karl Stevens and New School

Dark Horse's Brendan Wright caught Bark-handed!

Brendan Wright and Carl Barks

INTERN POWER. We had several interns tabling with their own comics. Low-res intern Kevin Uehlein and Ben Horak on the edges of a beautiful comics table, Beth Hetland and Pat Barrett in the middle. Ben's shy so all you get is his sideburns.

Interns

Intern Nomi Kane and her comic spread. The Back of Ben Horak.

Nomi Kane

Dead dog after dinner at Hungry Tiger Too with Dash Shaw, Bayard Baudoin, Tom Neely, Zack Soto, Benjamin Marra and his lovely lady.

Dead dog

Tom Kaczynski gets goofy when others aren't watching.

Tom and Dash

Thanks for coming out! Olan Mills family photo by Joshin Yamada with me, Dash, Jacq and Tom Kaczynski of Beta Testing the Apocalypse.

Stumptown

Eisner Awards Nominations
Written by Jen Vaughn | Filed under Walt KellyThe Comics JournalSpain RodriguezspainRoy CraneRick MarschallMichel GagneMichael KuppermanLove and RocketsLos Bros HernandezLorenzo MattottiLilli CarréKim ThompsonJustin HallJohnny GruelleJasonJaime HernandezJacques TardiGilbert HernandezGary PanterGary GrothDisneyCarol TylerCarl BarksCaptain Easyawards 6 May 2013 4:47 PM

Beauty and the Beasts

We love all of our books but are especially happy for the creators of the Eisner-nominated books. You can vote until June 12 online. If you haven't read all of them, check 'em out individually or via our list!

Best Short Story: "Moon 1969: The True Story of the 1969 Moon Launch," by Michael Kupperman, in Tales Designed to Thrizzle #8

"Rainbow Moment," by Lilli Carré, in Heads or Tails

Best Single Issue (or One-Shot): Tales Designed to Thrizzle #8, by Michael Kupperman

Best Humor Publication: Naked Cartoonists, edited by Gary Groth

Best Anthology: No Straight Lines: Four Decades of Queer Comics, edited by Justin Hall

Best Reality-Based Work: You'll Never Know, Book 3: A Soldier's Heart, by C. Tyler

Best Graphic Album-New: You'll Never Know, Book 3: A Soldier's Heart, by C. Tyler

Best Graphic Album-Reprint: Cruisin' with the Hound, by Spain

Heads or Tails, by Lilli Carré

Best Archival Collection/Project-Strips: Mister Twee Deedle: Raggedy Ann's Sprightly Cousin, by Johnny Gruelle, edited by Rick Marschall

Pogo, Vol. 2: Bona Fide Balderdash, by Walt Kelly, edited by Carolyn Kelly and Kim Thompson

Roy Crane's Captain Easy: The Complete Sunday Newspaper Strips, vol. 3, edited by Rick Norwood

Eisner spines

Best Archival Collection/Project-Comic Books: Walt Disney's Uncle Scrooge: Only a Poor Old Man, by Carl Barks, edited by Gary Groth

Young Romance: The Best of Simon & Kirby's Romance Comics, edited by Michel Gagné

Best U.S. Edition of International Material: Athos in America, by Jason

New York Mon Amour, by Benjamin LeGrand, Dominique Grange, and Jacques Tardi

Best Writer/Artist: Gilbert Hernandez, Love and Rockets New Stories, vol. 5

Jaime Hernandez, Love and Rockets New Stories, vol. 5

C. Tyler, You'll Never Know, Book 3: A Soldier's Heart

Best Painter/Multimedia Artist (interior art): Lorenzo Mattotti, The Crackle of the Frost

Best Lettering: C. Tyler, You'll Never Know, Book 3: A Soldier's Heart

Best Comics-Related Periodical/Journalism: tcj.com, edited by Timothy Hodler and Dan Nadel

Best Publication Design: Dal Tokyo, designed by Gary Panter and Family Sohn

Mister Twee Deedle: Raggedy Ann's Sprightly Cousin, designed by Tony Ong

Still no sure which to read? Heidi MacDonald, Cal Reid and company discuss the nominations on the Publishers Weekly podcast. Meanwhile, Chris Sims, Matt D. Wilson and more of War Rocket Ajax discuss the nominations, although I'm not sure how long the podcast will be up at this link. 

Some of the nominations gather in our mail room. See you in JULY!

Eisner Nominations

 

Daily OCD 5/2/13
Written by Jen Vaughn | Filed under Zippy the PinheadTom KaczynskiSteve DitkoSpain RodriguezspainRichard SalaPeanutsNoah Van SciverNico VassilakisMoto HagioMort MeskinMichael KuppermanLinda MedleyLilli CarréLeslie SteinLast VispoJulia GfrörerJosh SimmonsJim WoodringJames RombergerJacques BoyreauJack DavisHarvey KurtzmanGuy PeellaertGilbert HernandezEd PiskorEC ComicsDavid WojnarowiczDash ShawDaily OCDCrockett JohnsonCrag Hillcomics journalChuck ForsmanCarol TylerBill GriffithBarnabyAl WilliamsonAbstract Comics 2 May 2013 10:33 AM

The tantric release of Online Commentaries & Release:

Julio's Day

• Review: The LA Times and Noel Murray interviews Gilbert Hernandez about Julio's Day, Marble Season (from D&Q), plus the future books Love and Rockets: New Stories #6 and Maria M. LA Times: Gilbert says " ‘Julio’s Day’ is very simple. I mean, there’s a lot of heavy stuff going on, but I wanted it to read like a very simple, direct story."

• Interview: comiXology interviews Gilbert Hernandez about his most recent comic Julio's Day on their podcast.

• Review: Tom Spurgeon looks at Gilbert Hernandez's latest work, Julio's Day, on the Comics Reporter. "I found Julio's Day moving at times, again for reasons I'm not really certain I can fully articulate. The idea that we may be known as much for the choices of those around us and things that happen in proximity to ourselves as much as if not more than by the choices we make is either the ultimate comfort or the first back-of-throat rumblings of an existential howl."

• Plug: Julio's Day by Gilbert Hernandez is listed as one Amazon's Best Books of the Month

• Plug: Publishers Weekly lists Julio's Day as a pick of the week: "A marvelous and tightly scripted epic whose last page is a heart-stopper."

Review: Charles Hatfield of The Comics Journal flips through Julio's Day by Gilbert Hernandez. "When it comes to Beto, the lightning keeps striking, and if it doesn’t strike exactly the same place twice, it does testify to the same divided genius…It is the great lost Beto comic, belatedly given new form and new life.

• Review: Grovel's Andy Shaw reads Julio's Day by Gilbert Hernandez. "Just buy it now. This is Gilbert Hernandez at his finest, distilling a lifetime into a single volume of pleasure and pain. Julio’s Day is a literary classic, and another incredible piece of work from a true master of comics."

• Plug: Largehearted Boy plugs Julio's Day. "Gilbert compresses the history of the 20th century as well as the life of a man into a riveting, masterful story," writes Benn Ray.

• Plug (audio): Julio's Day is discussed on Daily Rios

The Adventures of Jodelle

• Review: The A.V. Club looks at The Adventures of Jodelle by Guy Peellaert. "The essays-which at 80 pages take up more of the book than Jodelle-are this volume's real selling point... Peellaert foregrounded the eroticism of advertising, and exposed how pulp imagery affects the public's understanding of everything from politics to gender. And he did it without resorting to polemics. The Adventures Of Jodelle book-both the comic strip and the supplemental material-is a delight both visually and intellectually," writes Noel Murray.

• Plug: Largehearted Boy plugs The Adventures of Jodelle by Guy Peellaert. "Think of Barbarella animated in that Yellow Submarine style and you get the idea of what Jodelle's adventures look like. This is comics as art."

• Plug: Comics Worth Reading plugs The Adventures of Jodelle by Guy Peellaert vis a vis a photo of ME holding it. Eat your heart out, actually eat Jodelle - with your eyes.

The Last Vispo

• Plug: Angel House Press is celebrated National Poetry Month with a focus on visual poetry, inspired by latest collection of it The Last Vispo, edited by Nico Vassilakis and Crag Hill. Check here for a month of visual poetry.

50 Girls 50

• Review: Heroes Complex at the LA Times looks at 50 Girls 50 by Al Williamson. Noel Murray writes, "These pieces are classic EC: punchy, knowing and ironic in the best sense of the word, in that they force readers to examine their own expectations. The best stories in '50 Girls 50 have readers rooting for heels, or celebrating war, all while framing the situation in such a way that readers question their responses." In reference to the whole EC Comics Library line, Murray writes, "All of these books are essential purchases for comics fans, but for those on a budget who are looking to prioritize…These are the books that best show off how EC took genre stories seriously, striving to create comics that didn’t treat readers as naive or ignorant."

• Plug: Boing Boing mentions our EC books, 50 Girls 50 and 'Tain't the Meat so you should probably buy them. "Fantagraphics released two beautiful hardbound books that collect the work of two of their superstars: Al Williamson and Jack Davis. The reproduction quality is superb," writes Mark Frauenfelder.

• Review: Fangoria reviews the next two EC books. Rick Trembles enjoys 'Tain't the Meat by Jack Davis. "Jack Davis’ dark comedic touch is all over this collection, diffusing the ghastly nature of the stories somewhat, an aspect to his work that was obviously lost on his opponents." Meanwhile with Al Willliamson's 50 Girls 50, Trembles writes "here we’re dazzled by romanticized sci-fi heroics and delicate line-work of the ilk of FLASH GORDON’S original artist Alex Raymond, Williamson’s main inspiration. Dinosaurs, spaceships, and outlandish otherworldly creatures populate the flora of faraway worlds, accompanied by buxom, exotically garbed beauties."

• Review: Nick Gazin sets his VICE sights on 'Tain't the Meat by Jack Davis. "Even though he wasn't a perfectionist, Jack Davis's laziness is better than most people's best work. When Davis does invest himself in a drawing it's just a mind bender. This is a must have for anyone who loves horror, EC, Jack Davis, any of that stuff."

The Dingburg Diaries

• Interview (audio): Beginnings with Wrestling Team interviews Bill Griffith about underground comix up to his most recent release,  Zippy: The Dingberg Diaries.

• Plug: Weird Universe highlights Zippy: The Dingberg Diaries on their site after Paul interviewed Bill Griffith at MoCCA 2013.

• Plug: Comics to find at MoCCA listed on AM New York. Zippy: The Dingburg Diaries and 50 Girls 50 are on the list of books to check out.

3 New Stories New School

• Review: Comics Bulletin looks at 3 New Stories from Dash Shaw. "This is a short, floppy-sized comic, but it's incredibly rich in complexity and depth. Shaw delivers an amazing collection of stories here."

• Interview: DigBoston and Clay Fernald talk to Dash Shaw about 3 New Stories, New School, Bottomless Belly Button and more. Shaw says, "Words and pictures are very different. They don't sit comfortably next to each other. Some cartoonists try to bring them closer together. Ware is like that. I like that space between things. I want the differences between things to be activated."

• Plug: Largehearted Boy hosts Atomic Books look at new comics included 3 New Stories. "Dash Shaw is a modern comics master. He experiments with everything from structure to narrative to color. If you're unfamiliar with his work, he's sort of like Gary Panter illustrating a Chris Ware story, or, in this case, 3 stories of dystopian societies," writes Benn Ray from Atomic Books.

Beta Testing the Apocalypse 7 Miles a Second

• Review: Nerds of a Feather enjoys Tom Kaczynski's Beta Testing the Apocalypse. Beta Philippe Duhart states "The thin lines, sharp angles, and rigid geometry…brings a clarity and simplicity that expertly balances the abstractness of the themes at the heart of Beta Testing the Apocalypse…One doesn’t need to have read Žižek to grasp Beta Testing’s themes and criticisms. One only needs to have only gone apartment hunting."

• Interview: Comics Bulletin and Keith Silve interview James Romberger and Marguerite Van Cook on 7 Miles A Second. Van Cook remembers, "David was a poet of the soul, there was always a tension between beauty and the vileness of what society did to anyone who was not of the mainstream. I once asked him what he did with the money he got from hustling when he was so young and he told me he would take a bus to the country and walk around. We thought it was so ironic that selling one's body and selling art had many of the same qualities. We laughed rather darkly, about how the body and art are commodified and priced so arbitrarily."

• Review: Publishers Weekly podcast looks at 7 Miles a Second in the time after MoCCA.

You'll Never Know: Book 3 The Heart of Thomas

• Interview (video): Back in January, Carol Tyler spoke to University of Southern California Provost's Professor Henry Jenkins and students as part of the USC Visions and Voices series. Mike Lynch was good enough to blog about it as soon as USC put up on the internet. She speaks about personal life and drawing comics, including the You'll Never Know series.

• Plug: Manga Bookshelf lists its first quarter favorites of 2013 and include Moto Hagio's newest book. "The Heart of Thomas was my most eagerly anticipated manga of the year, and while its January release date set the bar perhaps unfairly high for the year to come, I can’t bring myself to be sad about that."

Castle Waiting Vol 2 Definitive  Castle Waiting Vol. 1

• Review: Comics Worth Reading pulls out the Castle Waiting Vol. 2: Definitive Edition by Linda Medley. Johanna Draper Carlson writes "…it’s engrossing and beautifully drawn. I was surprised, reading the whole thing at once, how much of what figures in the final chapters was mentioned very early on. It gave me new appreciation for Medley’s long-term storytelling."

• Review: Calgary Public Library's Teen Blog speaks out on Castle Waiting Vol. 1 and 2 by Linda Medley. Adrienne writes, "Castle Waiting is a great comic book that takes elements from fairytales such as 'Sleeping Beauty' and combines them with a good dose of humour and plots about bearded ladies, two-headed girls, pregnancy and hidden libraries..I highly recommend her"

• Review: Strange Journal reviews Castle Waiting. "I’ve really fallen for it, it’s what they’d call a triple threat in show business: It can sing, dance AND act…In the tradition of Jeff Smith’s Bone and the better parts of Dave Sim’s Cerebus, Medley has conjured an amazing and beautiful world and filled it with flawed, interesting folks eking out their existence in a castle on the edge of the world," states Adam Blodgett.

Tales Designed to Thrizzle Vol.2 Delphine

• Interview: Slice Radio interviews Michael Kupperman on life and Tales Designed to Thrizzle Vol. 2

• Review: Delphine by Richard Sala is reviewed on Comics Bulletin. Jason Sacks "We're used to fairy tales telling the story of a journey by a girl from innocence to the real world. Delphine inverts the gender of those classic tales, but uses those familiar tropes to tell a familiar story. Richard Sala treads a world of metaphor and allusion, a world that feels as familiar as Grimm's Fairy Tales and as mysterious as our own heart." 

Out of the Shadows Barnaby

• Review: Nick Gazin sets his VICE sights on Out of the Shadows by Mort Meskin (edited by Steven Brower). "Shadows everywhere. The stories are just a lot of old timey chatter where people call each other chum and stuff but the compositions and choices that Mort Meskin made are pretty sophisticated."

• Interview: The Comics Journal posts an article titled Crockett Johnson and the Invention of Barnaby. Philip Nel writes about it all including the creation of fairy godfather, Mr. O'Malley's favorite catchphrase. Barnaby is coming so soon, we'll all cry "Cushlamochree!"

Impossible Tales: The Steve Ditko Archives Vol. 4   Messages in a Bottle

• Review: iFanboy hypes up Impossible Tales: The Steve Ditko Archives Vol. 4 (by Steve Ditko and edited by Blake Bell) coming out this May. Josh Christie states: "Steve Ditko is one of those guys you could picture on the Mount Rushmore of comics creators…Like so many of the great comics from the 1950s, the drug-fueled, macabre scenes look more like something out of an alternate dimension rather than from the states’ apple pie and bubblegum past."

• Review: Arkham Comics reviews Messages in a Bottle by B. Krigstein (edited by Greg Sadowski). A rough translation states, "Messages in a Bottle is a magical book, a timeless and stunning clarity: a lesson in comics as we do not meet every day."

The Hypo Heads or Tails The End of the Fucking World

• Review: Noah Van Sciver's The Hypo is reviewed on We Read Comics "Sciver absolutely nails it…We see Lincoln's plain spoken style, his humbleness, his self-doubt, and his honesty here with so much fucking economy and elegance."

• Interview: Noah Van Sciver appears on Comic Impact to talk about The Hypo and his newest comics project. 

• Review: Lilli Carré's Heads or Tails is reviewed on French podcast Dans ta bulle.

• Plug: The End of the Fucking World (Spoiler alert!) on The Chemical Box. "Similar to Derf’s analysis of Jeffery Dahmer in 'My Friend Dahmer', you can see James (along with Dahmer) struggling with their basic instincts."

Black is the Color Hip Hop Family Tree Eye of the Majestic Creature

• Plug: The Beat waxes on about Julia Gfrörer and Black is the Color. Zainab Akhtar writes, "Gfrorer’s work is consistently excellent, featuring themes of myth, folk lore, mysticism and spirituality, coupled with her fine-lined, evocative art." 

• Plug: Demencha calls Ed Piskor a Hip Hop Archeologist and more in reference to Hip Hop Famiy Tree. "His classic indie comic composition and narrative ease make the strip readable, informative (who knew Rammelzee went tagging with Basquiat?), and respectful to the art forms and artists it covers," writes J.P. McNamara.

• Review: In an oddly religious review, Mirrors of Christ looks at Eye of the Majestic Creature by Leslie Stein. "Sadly in this story the lyre (guitar) did not participate in the worship of God but in the desire of the flesh."

Sexytime The Furry Trap

• Review: Orgasm reviews Sexytime edited by Jacques Boyreau. "…if you want an oversized coffee-book that your guests might enjoying flipping through the pages as you bring refreshments, Sexytime is for you. And hey, it might even get you laid."

• Review: Josh Simmons' story from The Furry Trap, 'Mark of the Bat' is reviewed on Vorptalizer. Seat T. Collins comments, " 'Mark of the Bat' picks and picks and picks at our dovetailed drive for cruelty and need to feel superior to others until the fingernail tears off. It leaves a mark." 

Frank ipad  The Comics Joural Abstract Comics

• Plug: Comics Workbook enjoys reading The Portable Frank digitally thanks to comiXology.Leah writes, "Woodring’s way of transitioning images between panels (in, ya know, a pretty trippy way) lends itself really well to the panel by panel viewing of the digital reader."

• Plug: Tucker Stone mentions the new issue of The Comics Journal on the Comics Journal, not trying to get to incestuous. "The new issue of the Journal is pretty good; the Tardi interview is great."

• Plug: Textures of Ether looks at Abstract Comics. "Do Abstract Comics artists need to be aware of comics history?…Molotiu’s articles explore the theory behind Abstract Comics and are always interesting to read. They would make a welcome addition to any future AC anthology."

Cruisin' with the Hound

• Review: Nick Gazin checks out Cruisin' with the Hound by Spain Rodriguez on VICE. "Spain's comics always feel lively and real and there's this sense that he was probably too cool to be making comics but somehow he was. You can tell he was for real because he put the most energy into drawing motorcycles and cars and his people always look kinda like they're secondary to their machines. Great book from a great artist and story teller."

• Plug: Musical notation in Peanuts is analyzed on the Hooded Utilitarian. "In this sense, Schulz again collapses into Charlie Brown — locked out of high art virtuosity and romantic opportunities, disappointed in art as in love.…Schulz has, perhaps, found a way to invert Lichtenstein," writes Noah Berlatsky. 
 
• Plug (video): Al Jaffee and Robert Grossman are interviewed on the Imperium about the Harvey Kurtzman retrospective at the Society of Illustrators. Jaffee states, "His concepts were, to us at the time, revolutionary because he was breaking the third or the fourth wall, whatever you want to call it."

• Plug: And finally, Peanuts and Persian literature.

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