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Category >> Trina Robbins

Brave Women in Comix Then & Now Wednesday in SF!
Written by janice headley | Filed under Trina RobbinsNo Straight Linesevents 12 Nov 2013 10:13 AM

You simply can't have a panel about "brave women" in comics without having our own Trina Robbins in the mix!

So, join them on Wednesday, November 13th from 10:00 AM to Noon for the panel "Brave Women in Comix Then & Now: San Francisco Comix Scene from 1970 to Today." As you no doubt know, that city was the epicenter for "American Underground Comixs" in the '60s and '70s, breaking ground for new genres in comixs for women, gays, Latinos, and other diverse groups. This is sure to be a rare intellectual and art event that will bring forth unknown and inspirational dialogue from a feminine and historical perspective.

Along with Trina, the spirited round table discussion will also include Maureen Burdock of Laydeez Do Comix, Heather Plunkett from the Cartoon Art Museum, Isis Rodriguez of My Life as a Comic Stripper, and fellow pioneer Mary Wings from San Francisco's underground comix scene, who just happens to be in our award-winning anthology No Straight Lines: Four Decades of Queer Comics!

No Straight Lines: Four Decades of Queer Comics

 

Be sure to ask Trina about her fantastic new book Pretty in Ink: North American Women Cartoonists 1896-2013 -- a revised, updated and rewritten history of women cartoonists, with more color illustrations than ever before, and with some startling new discoveries!

The San Francisco branch of the California College of the Arts is located at 1111 Eighth Street. This event is FREE, and open to the public.

Pretty in Ink: North American Women Cartoonists 1896-2013 by Trina Robbins - Now in Stock
Written by Mike Baehr | Filed under Trina Robbinsnew releases 6 Nov 2013 3:09 PM

Just arrived and shipping now from our mail-order department:

Pretty in Ink: North American Women Cartoonists 1896-2013 by Trina Robbins

Pretty in Ink: North American Women Cartoonists 1896-2013
by Trina Robbins

180-page color/black & white 9" x 12" softcover • $29.99
ISBN: 978-1-60699-669-0

See Previews / Order Now

In the 21st century, women cartoonists have more opportunities than ever before: graphic novels in bookstores and libraries, and comics on the Internet, have created audiences for influential books such as Persepolis (Marjane Satrapi), Fun Home (Alison Bechdel), What It Is (Lynda Barry), and Hark! A Vagrant (Kate Beaton). Trina Robbins’ lavishly illustrated Pretty in Ink shows that, although the comics field was dominated by men, beginning in 1896 and throughout the 20th century, more women have been professional cartoonists than people previously thought. Robbins showcases cartoonists such as Lily Renée — an Austrian woman who escaped from Nazis, only to draw action/adventure comics exploits as exciting as her own — and Eva Mirabal, a Native American corporal whose G.I. Gertie strip showed the wacky side of the Women Army Corps (WAC). Trina Robbins is and has been the preeminent scholar of comics “herstory” for more than 30 years, and those new to comics and longtime fans alike will find much to discover in this updated and comprehensive volume.

Pretty in Ink: North American Women Cartoonists 1896-2013 by Trina Robbins - Photoset Preview
Written by Mike Baehr | Filed under Trina Robbinspreviewsnew releases 6 Nov 2013 10:56 AM

"Trina Robbins is one of the icons of the underground comix generation, a cartoonist and creative person always pushing forward in ways that have influenced and inspired her peers and admirers. She has become in the decades since an equally valuable advocate for the recognition of great female cartoonists." – Tom Spurgeon, The Comics Reporter

"A critical work, painstaking, impressive, funny, and moving in the way it shines a tender light on the most anonymous practitioners of the most anonymous art form of the twentieth century — but above all, a pleasure to get lost in. The universe is grateful to Trina Robbins for this book." – Michael Chabon (about The Great Woman Cartoonists)

"I was one of the legion of young girls who adored Wonder Woman back in the 1940s, and am one of the legion of admirers of Neil Gaiman's Death in the 1990s. In between I seemed to have missed a number of fascinating woman superheroes. But thanks to Trina Robbins's wonderful readable book, I now know where to look." – Jane Yolen (about The Great Women Superheroes)

"A Century of Women Cartoonists is eye-opening, inspiring, retroactive of yet another piece of women's history — and funny! So who was it that said feminists have no sense of humor?" – Robin Morgan (about A Century of Women Cartoonists)

Pretty in Ink: North American Women Cartoonists 1896-2013
by Trina Robbins

180-page color/black & white 9" x 12" softcover • $29.99
ISBN: 978-1-60699-669-0

Due to arrive this week! Click the thumbnails for larger versions; get more info, see more previews and pre-order your copy here:

http://www.fantagraphics.com/prettyinink

Pretty in Ink: North American Women Cartoonists 1896-2013 by Trina Robbins - Video/Photo Preview
Written by Mike Baehr | Filed under videoTrina Robbinspreviewsnew releases 5 Nov 2013 1:56 PM

Pretty in Ink: North American Women Cartoonists 1896-2013
by Trina Robbins

180-page color/black & white 9" x 12" softcover • $29.99
ISBN: 978-1-60699-669-0

Ships in: November 2013 (subject to change) — Pre-Order Now

With the 1896 publication of Rose O’Neill’s comic strip The Old Subscriber Calls, in Truth Magazine, American women entered the field of comics, and they never left it.

But, you might not know that reading most of the comics histories out there. Trina Robbins has spent the last thirty years recording the accomplishments of a century of women cartoonists, and Pretty in Ink is her ultimate book, a revised, updated and rewritten history of women cartoonists, with more color illustrations than ever before, and with some startling new discoveries (such as a Native American woman cartoonist from the 1940s who was also a Corporal in the women's army, and the revelation that a cartoonist included in all of Robbins's previous histories was a man!)

In the pages of Pretty in Ink you’ll find new photos and correspondence from cartoonists Ethel Hays and Edwina Dumm, and the true story of Golden Age comic book star Lily Renee, as intriguing as the comics she drew. Although the comics profession was dominated by men, there were far more women working in the profession throughout the 20th century than other histories indicate, and they have flourished in the 21st. Robbins not only documents the increasing relevance of women throughout the 20th century, with mainstream creators such as Ramona Fradon and Dale Messick and alternative cartoonists such as Lynda Barry, Carol Tyler, and Phoebe Gloeckner, but the latest generation of women cartoonists — Megan Kelso, Cathy Malkasian, Linda Medley, and Lilli Carré, among many others. Robbins is the preeminent historian of women comic artists; forget her previous histories: Pretty in Ink is her most comprehensive volume to date.

View Video & Photo Slideshow Preview in New Window

Pretty in Ink cover photo

Pretty in Ink: North American Women Cartoonists 1896-2013 by Trina Robbins - Excerpt
Written by Mike Baehr | Filed under Trina RobbinspreviewsComing Attractions 1 Oct 2013 12:53 PM

Not resting on the laurels of her 2013 Eisner Hall of Fame induction, Trina Robbins has taken her epochal history of women in comics and completely revised and updated it into a new volume, Pretty in Ink: North American Women Cartoonists 1896-2013, scheduled to hit stores this November.

Here we bring you a downloadable excerpt of Chapter 1, "The Queens of Cute," which introduces you to the creators of American icons the Kewpies (also the creator of the first known comic strip by an American woman), the Campbell Kids, and other cherubic characters in the late 19th and early 20th centuries. Later chapters take you through the Jazz Age, comics' Golden Age, the heyday of the underground, and up to the present day.

Don't miss this enlightening, entertaining, and essential volume — pre-order today!

Pretty in Ink: North American Women Cartoonists 1896-2013 by Trina Robbins

Pretty in Ink: North American Women Cartoonists 1896-2013 by Trina Robbins - First Look
Written by Mike Baehr | Filed under Trina RobbinsComing Attractions 19 Sep 2013 1:35 PM

Pretty in Ink cover

Pretty in Ink pages

Pretty in Ink pages

Trina Robbins wrote the book, literally, on the history of women cartoonists, and now she's back with a completely revised, updated and rewritten version. Pretty in Ink: North American Women Cartoonists 1896-2013 is an eye-opening, reader-friendly overview, loaded with illustrations and full comics pages in an oversized softcover format. From the early days of the art form, to the Golden Age, through the Underground, and into the present day, women's often-underappreciated contributions to the medium come under Robbins's spotlight to be given the recognition they deserve.

This book will be available in November; we'll have more previews for you in the coming weeks, and you can secure your copy by pre-ordering now.

Trina Robbins Presents Wonder Women: On Paper and Off!
Written by janice headley | Filed under Trina Robbinsmary fleenerJoyce Farmereventsart shows 10 Jun 2013 10:13 AM

Wonder Women: On Paper and Off

Legendary comics "herstorian," Trina Robbins, is bringing a chunk of her astounding collection of women's comics to the Women’s History Museum of California in San Diego this summer!

(The entire collection has NEVER been shown, she notes!)

Wonder Women: On Paper and Off explores the avenues women have made in the comic and graphic industry.  This exhibition follows the history of women in comics starting in the 20th century as artists and characters through today’s cartoon and graphic illustrations.

The exhibit, which opened this past Friday, June 7th, also features contributions from contributions from Joyce Farmer, Mary Fleener, Carol Lay, Ron May (collector), Peiter Ortiz (collector), Mimi Pond, and Andrea Tsurumi.

On Thursday, July 18th at 7:30 PM, Trina will be joined by Mary, Carol, and Ramona Fradon, for a panel discussion of their experiences of working in the comic industry, followed by a signing of her upcoming collection Pretty in Ink: American Women Cartoonists 1896-2013!

Pretty in Ink: American Women Cartoonists 1896-2013

The Women's Museum of California is located at 2730 Historic Decatur Road, Barracks 16. The exhibit runs through Sunday, September 1st, 2013.

This Week in Fantagraphics Events: 2/11-2/18
Written by janice headley | Filed under Trina RobbinsstaffMiss Lasko-GrossMalachi WardJordan Cranejon vermilyeaeventsEsther Pearl WatsonDiane NoominAline Kominsky-Crumb 11 Feb 2013 10:13 AM

Friday, February 15th

•  Seattle, WA:  Comics collective Intruder will be launching the fifth volume of their quarterly newspaper at Cairo, featuring a cover by our very own Tony Ong, with comics inside by staffer Jason T. Miles, freelancer David Lasky, and former staffer Alexa Koenings! (more info)

Saturday, February 16th

•  Los Angeles, CA:  Catch a comics reading with Esther Pearl Watson at the L.A. Zine Fest Reading and Rock Spectacular at Footsies! (more info)

•  Nelsonville, OH:  It's your last chance to view prints from The Last Vispo Anthology: Visual Poetry 1998-2008 at the Nelsonville Public Library! Pay your fines while you're there! (more info)

Sunday, February 17th

•  Portland, OR:  It's your last day to view the touring exhibit Graphic Details: Confessional Comics by Jewish Women at the Oregon Jewish Museum! This exhibition of original drawings, full comic books, and graphic novels will present the powerful work of eighteen artists whose intimate, confessional work has influenced the world of comics over the last four decades -- including our own Miss Lasko-Gross, Aline Kominsky-Crumb, Trina Robbins, and Diane Noomin! (more info)

•  Los Angeles, CA:  Jordan Crane, Esther Pearl Watson, and Mome veterans Jon Vermilyea and Malachi Ward will be exhibiting at the L.A. Zine Fest at the Ukrainian Cultural Center! (more info)

Daily OCD 12/19/12
Written by Jen Vaughn | Filed under William S BurroughsWalt KellyTrina RobbinsRichard SalaPeanutsPat ThomasNoah Van SciverMichael KuppermanMalcolm McNeillLove and RocketsLilli CarréJustin HallJosh SimmonsJohnny RyanJoe DalyJames RombergerJaime HernandezJacques BoyreauJack JacksonHarvey KurtzmanGilbert HernandezGary PanterEC ComicsDisneyDaily OCDCrockett JohnsonChris WrightCharles M SchulzCarl BarksBasil Wolverton 19 Dec 2012 10:17 PM

The last peanut of a day of Online Commentaries & Diversions aka the news you missed while present shopping, latke eating and flying:

The Lost Art of Ah Pook is Here Observed While Falling

• Review: The Comics Journal and Rucker crack the two books focusing on Malcom McNeill and William S. Burrough's artistic collaboration, Observed While Falling (the memoir) and The Lost Art of Ah Pook is Here. (the art book) "The art is awesome, the memoir is engaging. . .Ah Pook is in a characteristic style of Burroughs’s middle period.  He mixes a true-adventure story with bitter anti-establishment scenarios, gay sexual fantasies, science-fictional visualizations of chimerical mutants, and apocalyptic visions of a biological plague. . .The results are staggering—the best pictures of dicks that I’ve ever seen. . . ."

On the memoir "One of the pleasures of McNeill’s memoir, Observed While Falling, is reading about hear about his conversations with Burroughs.  Old Bill laid down some tasty aphorisms. . . Ah Pook is a word/image virus.  Study these new books and enjoy the disease."

 Love and Rockets Library box set

• Interview: Jaime and Gilbert Hernandez of Love and Rockets are interviewed by Tim Hodler, Dan Nadel and Frank Santoro on The Comics Journal. Jaime talks about becoming more popular cartoonists, "So Gilbert and I kind of set up our own ground where we go. We go, you love Raw? Raw’s East Coast? Love and Rockets is West Coast. And they go, 'So West Coast is primitive and old-fashioned?' Fine. It’s not art school."

Review: Comics Alliance features several of our box sets on their Holiday Gift Guide: Deluxe Editions. On the Love and Rockets Library Collection, by Gilbert and Jaime Hernandez Andy Khouri states,  This indie comics mainstay has been going for nearly 30 years, making Love and Rockets as intimidating to some new readers as even the densest superhero mythologies. Luckily, Fantagraphics has made the Los Bros Hernandez saga about a massive cast of startlingly lifelike characters digestible in the form of affordable reprint volumes published in chronological order."

Plug: Ode to Love and Rockets and Sonic Youth by a fan on Buzzfeed.

Corpse on the Imjin!

Review: Douglas Wolk reviews Harvey Kurtzman’s EC stories in Corpse on the Imjin! for the New York Times. "Kurtzman’s writing could be bombastic — nearly all of these stories’ titles end in exclamation points — but, as the United States became mired in the Korean War, his reeling disgust at the horrors of war (and his thick, slashing brush strokes) made for shockingly bold rhetoric."

 Mark Twain's Autobiography 1910-2010  Tales Designed the Thrizzle Vol. 1  Tales Designed the Thrizzle Vol. 2

•Review: The Atlantic lists Mark Twain's Autobiography 1910-2010 by Michael Kupperman as one of The Best Books I Read This Year. Chris Heller says "Kupperman’s brilliance isn’t just in his humor, though. Mark Twain’s Autobiography is meant to be read in small doses, no more than half a dozen pages at a time. Trust me: You don’t want to gorge on a book that’s this weirdly amusing. But after a peek into Kupperman’s hysterically twisted mind, you’ll keep wanting to go back for more."

• Plug: Liquid Television spotlights Michael Kupperman, Mark Twain's Autobiography 1910-2010 and Tales Designed to Thrizzle Vols. 1 and 2 ."You may recognize him (or not) from some of his comedy writing for legit platforms (SNL, Huff Post, etc). He does a comic called Tales Designed to Thrizzle that’s pretty good."

The Hypo

• Review: The Denver Westword is proud of their hometown hero, Noah Van Sciver, and his critical acclaim for The Hypo. Read on!

• Review: Comics Bulletin releases its 2012 Best Graphic Novel List and The Hypo by Noah Van Sciver makes it. "Van Sciver's toolkit includes the pens and pins of pathos and pain, self-doubt and angst, as much as it contains determination and fortitude. The Lincoln of The Hypo transcends his time, place, and even (or maybe especially) his name. . . It stands as a true example of the capabilities of this medium to deliver stories in a truly visceral manner," writes Daniel Elkin.

• Review: Unshelved comics review The Hypo by Noah Van Sciver. Gene Ambaum writes,"The mood of Lincoln’s life in Springfield, Illinois, is well-expressed via the rough-hewn, cross-hatched skies, floorboards, and backgrounds."

Spacehawk

• Review: Tim Callahan has nothing but love for Spacehawk by Basil Wolverton on Comic Book Resources. He states, "Wolverton's world is a weird and ugly and beautifully innocently horrible charmingly delightful one, and it has more in common with the absurd genre riffs from something like Pendleton Ward's Adventure Time or Jesse Moynihan's Forming or Tom Gauld's Goliath than it does the bland superhero melodrama of 'Marvel Mystery Comics'."

Walt Disney's Uncle Scrooge: Walt Disney's Donald Duck: Dal Tokyo

• Review: Comics Bulletin's Favorite Reprints Books of 2012 include Gary Panter's Dal Tokyo and our Carl Barks reprints. In reference to Carl Barks' Uncle Scrooge and Donald Duck, "I would not hesitate to say that Fantagraphics’ reprints of Barks’ Duck comics may very well be the best collection series that any comic company is doing today! . . Each story is funny, smart and just plain fun and Fantagraphics treat each and every panel on the page with care and detail," states Nick Boisson. Jason Sacks writes "[Dal Tokyo is] a freaking godsend from the reprint editors at Fantagraphics because it unearthed an amazing, surreal, brilliant lost classic that's like an artifact from some amazing parallel dimension.. . Readers are asked to bring our perceptions to these pages, to bring our intelligence and passion and appreciation for abstraction and love for everything that feels different and yet the same as everyday life."

• Review: School Library Journal files Walt Disney's Donald Duck: A Christmas for Shacktown by Carl Barks in the Dewey (Huey and Louey) decimal of their hearts. J. Caleb Mozzocco says "[It] features another 200 pages of master cartooning from 'The Good Duck Artist' in a nicely produced bookshelf- or backpack-ready hardcover edition. . .  the Barks books are great comics for kids and adult fans of the medium."

• Review: Uncle Scrooge: Only a Poor Old Man makes the Best of or Our Favorite Books of 2012 list on the Village Voice. Alan Scherstuhl states, “Sprightly, inventive, wise, and more exciting than 60-year-old-duck tales should be, Barks's work already stands at the top of any list of history's greatest comics. It should also rank high among stories, period.”

• Plug: J. Caleb Mozzocco reveals the many coats of Uncle Scrooge (SO FAR). Find a cut that works and get it in every color, right?

Sexytime

• Review: Brooklyn Based thinks Sexytime edited by Jacques Boyreau is for you and suggests books for reading and giving. "This book is a journey into the aesthetic of porn," states Jon Reiss.

Heads Or Tails

• Interview: Alex Dueben interviews Lilli Carré on Comic Book Resources about comics and animation. "I loved designing and arranging the [Heads or Tails]. Figuring out which pieces to include and the best order for them took quite a while, since I wanted each story to speak to the one before and after it, and to have a good flow despite the shift in styles. It was like making a high-stakes mix tape."

• Review: North Adams Transcript and John Seven look at Heads or Tails by Lilli Carré. "The multi-faceted Lilli Carre -- author, illustrator, animator -- presents stories that are as gentle as they are cryptic, in which the darkness of her themes meld perfectly with the sweetness of her style. . .Carre’s short work is collected and celebrated, revealing a creator of power, easily on the level with lauded types like Chris Ware."

The Furry Trap

• Review: Hooded Utilitarian makes it through Josh Simmons' The Furry Trap (probably with all the lights on in the house). James Romberger writes it is “packed cover to cover with shudders that cannot be anticipated, that grow worse as they progressively become less clearly defined. The last narrative is the most frightening because it is a straightforwardly articulated bit of cinematography on paper that, as with the most effective of suspenseful creations, gains in impact from what is never shown, the reader’s mind having already been prepared by the foregoing tales to expect the worst.”

The Complete Peanuts 1985-1986 Peanuts box sets Charlie Brown's Christmas Stocking

Review: Lettering master Todd Klein on the Complete Peanuts Vol. 18 1985-1986 . "Thirty-five years into his fifty year run on this strip, Charles Schulz continues to keep me smiling and laughing. . .Highly recommended."

Review: Comics Alliance features several of our box sets on their Holiday Gift Guide: Deluxe Editions. On The Complete Peanuts Collection box sets by Charles M Schulz. Andy Khouri writes,Reprinted in chronological order with the highest production values, any one of these books would make an auspicious addition to any bookshelf.

Review: School Library Journal looks at Charlie Brown’s Christmas Stocking by Charles M. Schulz. J. Caleb Mozzocco says, "Schulz’s Peanuts has always been unique in its ability to speak to audiences of adults and children simultaneously. . . Nice then to have a comic that can speak to kids, adults and the little kids the adults used to be all at the same time—even if only for a quick 40 pages or so."

Pogo Vol. 2

Review: HeroesOnline looks at The Complete Syndicated Pogo Vol. 2 "Bona Fide Balderdash" by Walt Kelly. “Pogo certainly belongs on any informed list of the top 5 newspaper comic strips of all time.  The artwork is stunning, the pacing is fast, the characters simply come alive on the page; the plot-lines are crazy and labyrinthine and above all hilarious . . . Fantagraphics does the Kelly oeuvre proud with beautiful production values and insightful introductory material,” states Andy Mansell.

Dungeon Quest 3

• Review: Dungeon Quest 3 by Joe Daly is the Best of Year 2012 on the Forbidden Planet International site.  Clark Burscough writes, “Deceptively simple looking artwork contains hidden depths, and the mythology that Joe Daly is building up around these characters and their world is starting to get properly out there.. . And on top of that – it’s laugh out loud funny. I can’t go into precisely why, because it’s also laugh out loud filthy. Something for everyone in these books.

7 Miles a Second

• Interview: Comic Book Resources and Alex Dueben interview James Romberger on his collaboration of 7 Miles a Second (and Post York). On his love of New York-centric books, “It is strange that I'll get used to an aspect of the landscape, but so often, I will come out to find it gone and replaced with something completely different. Still, I also love that shifting quality and the multiculturalism of the city; it is my primary subject,” says Romberger.

Listen, Whitey!

• Review: Listen, Whitey! on NPR Music for its MUSIC compilation. Matt Sullivan, assistant to author Pat Thomas, talks to Michaelangeo Matos about the project to accompany the book. "There's no way that Sony or EMI were going to [automatically] say yes to the Bob Dylan or John & Yoko tracks, because they get those requests all day. Years ago, Pat went to Bob Dylan's office and got those guys to approve it. The same thing with Yoko. . ."

Pretty in Ink

• Plug: Speaking of 2013, Johanna Draper Carlson of Comics Worth Reading can't wait for Pretty in Ink: American Women Cartoonists by Trina Robbins to come out! 

Blacklung Los Tejanos and Lost Cause

• Review (reprint): Publishers Weekly reissues their prime reviews on Blacklung, Heads or Tails, and Los Tejanos and Lost Cause

• Plug: Nick Gazin of VICE posts pictures a friend sent of the Spain Rodriguez tribute murals made this month in Brooklyn.

Plug: Why doesn’t Richard Sala take on the Caped Crusader? A question posed by Michael May on CBR.

• Plug: Johnny Ryan's Prison Pit shirts and vinyl figurines are on sale at Monster Worship for the truly tainted souls.

• Plug: Justin Hall (editor of No Straight Lines) has a new comic in the comics edition of SF Weekly. Enjoy!

No Straight Lines Signing in San Francisco Tomorrow!
Written by janice headley | Filed under Trina RobbinsNo Straight LinesJustin Hallevents 25 Jul 2012 10:50 AM

Join our wonderful editor Justin Hall for a celebration of No Straight Lines: Four Decades of Queer Comics!

He'll be hosting an awesome event at Books Inc. in the Castro this Thursday, July 26th at 7:30 PM, and he'll be joined by a cast of contributors, including Trina Robbins, Ed Luce, Rick Worley, and Robert Triptow for a series of comic book readings to celebrate the release of this important anthology!

Books Inc. is located at 2275 Market Street in San Francisco. Don't miss it!