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Category >> Wilfred Santiago

Daily OCD: 9/27/10
Written by Mike Baehr | Filed under Wilfred SantiagoTony MillionaireStephen DixonRIP MDreviewsRand HolmesPatrick RosenkranzMoto HagioMegan KelsomangaGreg IronsDaily OCDComing AttractionsBob LevinBlake BellBill Everett 27 Sep 2010 4:54 PM

Today's Online Commentary & Diversions:

What Is All This? Uncollected Stories

Review: "This mammoth collection [What Is All This?] presents five decades of Dixon: sex, frustration, and attempts at deeper communication, mostly missed. The 62 stories evoke neuroses, delusion, banality, and everyday absurdities in deceptively simple sentences... There are echoes of Ernest Hemingway and prefigurings of Raymond Carver's lower-middle-class minimalism infusing tales of scrappers and scrapers... Usually sublime, sometimes sloppy, and occasionally bewildering, these stories are a testament to an impressive career spent too much under the radar." – Publishers Weekly (Starred Review) [Temporary link]

A Drunken  Dream and Other Stories [Pre-Order]

Review: "With its mix of sci-fi, romance, tragedy and comedy, A Drunken Dream is a memorable manga journey that shouldn't be missed or dismissed. [...] Drawing from deeply-felt personal experiences, Hagio draws stories for every person who has felt like an outsider, who has regretted past actions that can never be erased, or who has longed to be accepted for being who they are, not what people want them to be. These ideas sound so simple — but when touched by Hagio's pen, this is punch-in-the-gut powerful. [...] ★★★★1/2" – Deb Aoki, About.com: Manga

Billy Hazelnuts and the Crazy Bird

Review: "While they may not be standard children’s books, they are fun and entertaining and full of stuff kids would like, without being obscene or intended for mature audiences. They are the kind of books you would want your kid reading if your kid wasn’t a total dork. [...] You get the feeling of reading old fairy tales, where the Prince wasn’t always charming, the villains would erect down right disturbing and evil plots against the characters and the story, or just the world in general was presented as a harsh reminder of reality. [...] Tony [Millionaire]... really lets his imagination run with his latest book, Billy Hazelnuts and the Crazy Bird. [...] With or without children, you can feel good about reading this book." – Brian Jones, Flash Flood Media

Artichoke Tales [Pre-Order]

Review: "Artichoke Tales is by any definition a remarkable book — the first graphic novel by Megan Kelso, who has so far worked largely in the short story form, and a book that displays at every page Kelso’s unique voice as a graphic storyteller and the care and attention she lavished on this project over the past several years. [...] This is a beautiful book, at times a heartbreaking book. One feels the precision and thought behind every word, every line, all of it edited down and arranged to a spareness that is paradoxically lush and textured." – Jared Gardner, Guttergeek

Coming Attractions: "Why aren’t there more sports comics? More to the point why aren’t there more absolutely wonderful looking sports comics like Fantagraphics 2011 release 21: The Story of Roberto Clemente by Wilfred  Santiago?" – Richard Cowdry, The Forbidden Planet International Blog Log

RIP, M.D. [Pre-Order]

Plug: "[Rip M.D.] seems to be a comic more geared to a juvenile public, but should be pretty cool because there are a lot of monsters, really violent werewolves, zombies, and best of all, vampires that do not sparkle!" – Submundo Mamão (translated from Portuguese)

The Artist Himself: A Rand Holmes Retrospective [Pre-Order]

Interview: Guttersnipe's Shawn Conner talks to Patrick Rosenkranz about his new book The Artist Himself: A Rand Holmes Retrospective: "One thing’s for sure with Rand; there are a lot of good cartoonists who are not very interesting people. But he was both, an interesting person and a great cartoonist. That’s what interested me in the story."

You Call This Art?! A Greg Irons Retrospective

Profile: "Some artists seem to have had greatness as their destination as surely as if a tracking device had been implanted in their genes. Some veer toward it capriciously like a demon had seized the wheel. They start with a talent — to which they feed — in bites and gulps — their times; and, once expressed, the result is… YOWL! One of these was the underground cartoonist Greg Irons, the subject of Patrick Rosenkranz’s overlooked — and fascinating — retrospective You Call This Art?!!" – Bob Levin, The Comics Journal

Blake Bell & Wendy Everett

Event: On his blog, Blake Bell reports from his Fire & Water book launch & presentation with Wendy Everett in Toronto on Saturday

Happy Roberto Clemente Day
Written by Eric Reynolds | Filed under Wilfred Santiago 8 Sep 2010 9:36 AM

  

Today is Roberto Clemente Day, honoring Latin America's greatest baseball player of All-Time, and one of the game's great humanitarians. Clemente was a 12-time All-Star and Hall of Famer who died in a plane crash on Dec. 31, 1972, while attempting to deliver supplies to earthquake victims in Nicaragua. 

This is a great opportunity for us to re-announce one of our most eagerly-awaited projects of the last few years: Wilfred Santiago's forthcoming graphic novel, 21: The Story of Roberto Clemente. Wilfred has been working on this book for several years now, and it's been delayed more than once because the project kept growing bigger and bigger. We're pleased to announce that Wilfred has completed the 200-page book and the book will be released in April, 2011, in time for the 2011 baseball season. Spring always brings a slew of new and interesting baseball books, and we expect 21 to lead next year's pack. 

The biographical 21: The Story of Roberto Clemente is a human drama of courage, faith and dignity, inspired by the life of baseball star Roberto Clemente. No other baseball player dominated the 1960s like Roberto Clemente and no other Latin American player achieved his numbers. Born in 1924 in Puerto Rico, Clemente excelled in track and field and loved baseball. By the age of 17 he was playing in the PR Winter league. Spotted by the big-league scouts because of his hitting, fielding, and throwing abilities, he joined the Pittsburgh Pirates in 1954. A fierce competitor, within two seasons he was hitting above .300 consistently. He played like a man possessed, fielding superbly, unleashing his rifle arm, and hitting in clutch situations. Despite his aesthetic brilliance, he faced prejudice throughout his career and was given his due only after his unexpected and tragic death in a 1972 plane crash.

Although baseball was his obsession, Clemente never lost sight of his dreams and his greater responsibilities outside the game. This sense of urgency is what came to define him beyond that of a grand athlete. His eventual success and accompanying celebrity gave him the opportunity to engage his conscience in public life. He died when his plane went down in the Caribbean Sea on a relief mission to earthquake-torn Nicaragua that he personally directed. 

21 chronicles Clemente's life from his early days growing up in rural Puerto Rico, the highlights of his career (including the 1960 World Series where he helped the Pirates win its first victory in 33 years, and his 3000th hit in 1972 during the last official at-bat of his life) as well as his private life and public mission off the field.

After his death, Major League Baseball declared September 18 to be "Roberto Clemente Day," and in 1999, Pittsburgh's Sixth Street Bridge was renamed the Roberto Clemente Bridge in honor of the greatest Latino ballplayer in history. Wilfred Santiago captures the grit of Clemente's rise from his impoverished Puerto Rican childhood, to the majesty of his performance on the field, to his fundamental decency as a human being in a drawing style that combines realistic attention to detail and expressive cartooning. 

Wilfred Santiago was born in Ponce, Puerto Rico. He now lives in Chicago. 

21: The Story of Roberto Clemente by Wilfred Santiago
$22.99 Hardcover • 200 pages • April 2011
ISBN 978-1-56097-892-3 

COMICS & GRAPHIC NOVELS / Nonfiction

  

Things to see: 8/31/10
Written by Mike Baehr | Filed under Wilfred SantiagoTom KaczynskiTim LaneThings to seeSteven WeissmanRichard SalaRenee FrenchPaul HornschemeierMark KalesnikoMarco CoronaLilli CarréLaura ParkJon AdamsJim FloraJasonHans RickheitGabrielle BellDerek Van GiesonBen Catmull 31 Aug 2010 10:53 PM

Periodic clips & strips, just under the wire (for the Pacific time zone anyway) — click for improved/additional viewing at the sources:

Cartoonists

• From Wilfred Santiago, a cartoon drawn for our 30th anniversary back in 2006

folk art house - Ben Catmull

A glimpse of Ben Catmull's current work in progress

Tellusalie - Jason

• From Jason: A 1981 cartoon; a couple of cover illustrations; a Mjau Mjau back cover painting; and I think "T.W." is Tom Waits

Truman Capote

Steven Weissman's Truman Capote strip re-redux

Home from the War - Richard Sala

Richard Sala presents selections from his Comic Art Collective offerings, including Peculia pinups and this 1991 illustration

Briganti page 7 - Marco Corona

The last page of Marco Corona's "briganti" story

Belligerent Piano - Tim Lane

• The latest installment of Tim Lane's Belligerent Piano

Bank Robbery detail - Jim Flora

• Speaking of thieves: a detail of Jim Flora's The Big Bank Robbery, circa mid-1960s

loop lady still - Lilli Carré

Lilli Carré presents a still from an animated loop drawing in progress; also, she announces that her short film Head Garden is part of a film program at Chicago's Lincoln Hall tomorrow/tonight (Sept. 1)

San Diego - Gabrielle Bell

• The fifth installment of Gabrielle Bell's San Diego Comic-Con Comicumentary features her ex Michel Gondry, nudity, and awkwardness

Pacer - Mark Kalesniko

• More AMC Pacer studies by Mark Kalesniko for Freeway

Dr. Huba & Mr. Moob - Paul Hornschemeier

Paul Hornschemeier's latest t-shirt design for his Forlorn Funnies Shirt Shop

the best song in the world

• A happy/sad Lewis comic by Laura Park 

Tag K - Renee French

• From Renee French: mitt guy, a stage, the cover to something called Tag K

Ectopiary page 39 - Hans Rickheit

Hans Rickheit's Ectopiary page 39

Devil Doll part 4 page 4 - Derek Van Gieson

• "The Devil Doll" part 4 page 4 by Derek Van Gieson, plus another Moomin parody strip

Isaac Cates - Tom Kaczynski

Tom Kaczynski draws comics scholar Isaac Cates, who returns the favor; Tom's also been writing a series of thought-provoking essays on comics on his Transatlantis blog, well worth reading

Jon Adams

• As seen on Boing Boing, it's Jon Adams's cereal-mascot mashup; plus a new Truth Serum strip

Daily OCD: 9/2/09
Written by Mike Baehr | Filed under Zak SallyWilfred SantiagoTim LanereviewsLos Bros HernandezJules FeifferJacques TardiAnders Nilsen 2 Sep 2009 1:12 PM

Today's Online Commentary & Diversions:

• Review: "From the opening panel until the final words, Tardi's adaptation of Manchette's crime novel [West Coast Blues] sizzles with a dazzling graphic intensity... Much like the 1950s American crime novels they emulate, Tardi and Manchette offer a impressive display of destructive violence, wanton love, and disregard for life. Showcasing Tardi's singular artistic talents, the brilliant West Coast Blues emerges as one of the best crime graphic novels ever produced." - Rick Klaw, The SF Site: Nexus Graphica

• Review: "[West Coast Blues] is slyly funny without being jokey; thrilling without ever seeming manipulative; cool, distant and ironic in its narrative voice; immediate in its depiction of violence. What do Tardi's illustrations add? Mostly a crowded sense of daily life, an ironic, sense-sharpening departure from the dark, shadowy atmospherics that sometimes nudge noir toward mere style." - Peter Rozovsky, Detectives Beyond Borders

• Review: "If you were a Martian trying to figure out America in the second half of the 20th century, you could do worse than to start by reading Jules Feiffer’s Village Voice cartoons [collected in Explainers]." - Sarah Boslaugh, PopMatters

• Review: Patricia Portales's review of Your Brain on Latino Comics (University of Texas Press) for the San Antonio Current includes mentions of the Hernandez Brothers and Wilfred Santiago

• Things to see: Santa gets a knee to the gut courtesy of Tim Lane

• Things to see and buy: New items in the 46 Million benefit auction organized by Anders Nilsen, including album cover art by Zak Sally

This book...
Written by Eric Reynolds | Filed under Wilfred Santiago 11 Sep 2008 9:46 PM

... is gonna knock baseball fans' socks off. Some of the most crackling baseball action in comics I've ever seen (and there's more than you'd think).

  

Hidden Gems Sale spotlight: Wilfred Santiago
Written by Mike Baehr | Filed under Wilfred Santiagosales specials 23 Jul 2008 11:00 PM

Every day in July we're spotlighting books from our month-long Hidden Gems Sale, wherein we're featuring some of our under-the-radar backlist titles and encouraging you to try them by offering them at a nice discount of 25% off!

The subject of today's spotlight, Wilfred Santiago, is poised to make a major splash in 2009 with 21, his comics biography of baseball legend Roberto Clemente.

In My Darkest Hour by Wilfred Santiago

In My Darkest Hour

The Age of Anxiety has never been better depicted in comics form than in In My Darkest Hour, a modernist, mainstream graphic novel that explores the inner life of its protagonist, Omar Guerrero, a 28 year-old Latin American transient, who confronts his pervasive feelings of inadequacy, anger, guilt, and escalating alienation. The first full-length graphic novel from Pop Life collaborator Wilfred Santiago, in a lovely two-color format.

128-page two-color  7" x 9" softcover
regularly $14.95 • ON SALE $11.21
Order Now


Wilfred Santiago talks Roberto Clemente
Written by Eric Reynolds | Filed under Wilfred Santiago 25 Mar 2008 12:20 PM

Read it here. 

21: The Roberto Clemente Story
Written by Eric Reynolds | Filed under Wilfred Santiago 11 Mar 2008 1:46 PM
  

I really enjoyed this CBR feature on Wilfred Santiago's forthcoming graphic novel, 21 (which is still many months away), a biography of baseball legend Roberto Clemente. I'm a big baseball nerd, and was already looking forward to this book, but after reading this feature I'm even more sold. Santiago's clear grasp of Clemente's place not only in baseball history but also the Civil Rights movement and Puerto Rican history is palpable, and is sure to make for an engaging, important read. And the images I've seen, including those in this piece, are dazzling.


21 preview
Written by Mike Baehr | Filed under Wilfred Santiagopreviews 4 Feb 2008 10:36 AM

21 by Wilfred Santiago

Wilfred Santiago just joined the Flickr and is posting previews of 21, his forthcoming Fantagraphics graphic novel about baseball great Roberto Clemente. Check it out!

Eustace Tilley contest entries
Written by Eric Reynolds | Filed under Wilfred SantiagoPeanuts 29 Jan 2008 2:21 PM

The New Yorker has a flickr pool with entries in their aforementioned Eustace Tilley redesign contest. I was partial to this one, courtesy robotalphabet:

  

And here's a fine contribution from our own Wilfred Santiago:

Eustaciotilley.gif

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