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How to Be Happy
How to Be Happy
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Walt Disney's Mickey Mouse Vol. 5: Outwits the Phantom Blot [U.S./CANADA ONLY]
Walt Disney's Mickey Mouse Vol. 5: Outwits the Phantom Blot [U.S./CANADA ONLY]
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Special Exits [Softcover Ed.]
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Prince Valiant Vol. 9: 1953-1954
Prince Valiant Vol. 9: 1953-1954
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Category >> audio

Daily OCD: 4/19/10
Written by Mike Baehr | Filed under Roy CranePrince ValiantPopeyePirus and MezzoPeanutsLove and RocketsLos Bros HernandezJean SchulzHans RickheitHal FosterGilbert HernandezEC SegarDaily OCDcontestsCharles M SchulzCaptain Easyaudio 19 Apr 2010 3:56 PM

Online Commentary & Diversions:

Captain Easy, Soldier of  Fortune: The Complete Sunday Newspaper Strips Vol. 1 (1933-1935)

Review: "At every turn, and every turn of the page, in Captain Easy, Soldier of Fortune:  The Complete Sunday Newspaper Strips Vol. 1 from Fantagraphics, the reaction is the same: Good Lord, but Roy Crane could draw. ...There are countless pleasures in this first volume of the Captain Easy Sunday pages." – Steve Duin, The Oregonian

Hate Annual #8

Review: "Of course, the Bradleys story remains the best reason to pick up any of these Hate Annuals, and this time Bagge doesn’t disappoint; even though I still can’t stand Buddy in his Popeye the Sailor look, this story of wife Lisa wanting to get out of the house (since the kid is in school) and do something for herself, eventually ending up in a two-woman rock band playing in a strip club, is consistently funny and sharply observed." – Johnny Bacardi, Popdose

King of the Flies Vol. 1: Hallorave

Plug: In the Portland Mercury, Floating World's Jason Leivian recommends Mezzo & Pirus's King of the Flies for fans of Paul Verhoeven's 1980 film Spetters: "Similar stories of fucked up youngsters spiraling into a black hole of self destruction with incredibly rendered artwork that will appeal to fans of Charles Burns."

Luba

Plug: "If you've not checked out Luba by Gilbert Hernandez, you should. Especially if you live in LA. ... Luba is as funny and delightful as ever in these stories (some super short one-pagers, others much longer, over a hundred stories in this collection) of her and her family and the play between their work lives and personal lives is comical and poignant and over the top in classic Hernandez style." – Callie Miller, LAist (via Robot 6)

Popeye Vol. 4:

Plug: "I've spent most of this week reading "Plunder Island," the fourth and latest collection of classic Popeye comics from Fantagraphics. This is the third time I've read this material... and it still never fails to enthrall me. In fact, I think Popeye has knocked Peanuts and Krazy Kat out of my personal canon to become my MOST FAVORITE COMIC EVER at the moment. There's just something about E.C. Segar's blend of melodrama, adventure and unrestrained, big-footed comedy that really knocks my socks off." – Chris Mautner, Robot 6

The Definitive Prince Valiant Companion [Softcover Ed.]

Interview: Via ¡Journalista!: "New to the TCJ Audio Archive: Over an hour of excerpts from Arn Saba’s 1979 interview with Prince Valiant creator Hal Foster, recorded toward the end of Foster’s life and originally published in The Comics Journal #102," and also reprinted in The Definitive Prince Valiant Companion

Profile: "Other comics publishers have fallen all over themselves trying to leverage a hoped-for crossover appeal into the mainstream of culture in the last twenty or so years. Meanwhile, Fantagraphics has hung surprisingly tight to their mission statement. But the bigger surprise for me came from learning that Fantagraphics still runs its publishing operation out of the same full-to-bursting house in Maple Leaf where they first planted their Seattle roots in 1989." – E. Magnuson, In North Seattle (Seattle P-I)

The Squirrel Machine

Contest: One lucky person will win a free copy of The Squirrel Machine by Hans Rickheit from Kevin Church, who describes the book as "beautifully drawn, disturbing and sad"

Love and Rockets: New  Stories #2

Links: Love & Maggie highlights some recent Hernandez Bros. -related web action

The Complete Peanuts 1975-1976 (Vol. 13) [NORTH AMERICA ONLY]

PSA: In a letter to the editor of the Pittsburgh Post-Gazette, Jean Schulz warns collectors to be on the lookout for counterfeit original Peanuts art (via Mike Lynch via ¡Journalista!) — I guess this lady needn't worry

Nerd-out: Spurge's no. 5 superpower FTW

Daily OCD: 4/13/10
Written by Mike Baehr | Filed under Usagi YojimboStan SakaireviewsPirus and MezzoNewaveLove and RocketsJohn PhamJim WoodringJacques TardiEleanor Davisdavid sandlinDaily OCDBasil Wolvertonawardsaudio 13 Apr 2010 5:39 PM

Online Commentary & Diversions — catching up from MoCCA weekend, with more catch-up tomorrow:

An Alphabetical Ballad of Carnality

Award: Congratulations to David Sandlin for receiving a 2010-2011 fellowship from the New York Public Library’s Dorothy and Lewis B. Cullman Center for Scholars and Writers. "The fellowship lasts from September to May. Each fellow gets an office in the library’s Stephen A. Schwarzman Building at Fifth Avenue and 42nd Street, full access to the library’s research collections, and a stipend, which last year was $60,000," reports Kate Taylor of The New York Times. Not too shabby!

It Was the War of the Trenches

Review: "Few people alive today are old enough to remember World War I, and as it recedes into the past, the 'war to end all wars' becomes more abstract. But French cartoonist Jacques Tardi's graphic novel, It Was The War of the Trenches..., brings the Great War to life in all its mud- and blood-soaked misery. Without a trace of sentimentality, Tardi's richly detailed and grimly rendered vignettes depict the horror, illness, cruel manipulations, and stupidity of this giant black spot in human history." – Mark Frauenfelder, Boing Boing

Sublife Vol. 2

Review: "Long-lost astronauts, homicidal bloggers, baseball legends and wayward skaters all find a home in John Pham’s captivating comic series Sublife. With only two issues on the street, Sublife has already established an achingly familiar universe in all of its disparate ongoing narratives. Deftly juggling the melancholy of Adrian Tomine’s Optic Nerve with some Cormac McCarthy-inspired apocalyptic action and plenty of skillfully subdued deadpan humor, Pham proves himself a master of multifarious emotions and artist stylings." – We Love You So

Usagi Yojimbo Book 2: Samurai

Review: "While I enjoyed Sakai's artwork in the first volume, this second trade collection is even stronger. ... I'm so glad I'm finally sitting down and reading this series, and my only regret is that I didn't do it sooner. Usagi Yojimbo is a great addition to the canon of samurai stories, and is definitely highly recommended for anyone who is a fan of wandering ronin or just good storytelling." – Rob McMonigal, Panel Patter

The Culture Corner

Review: "Culture Corner remains a curiosity in comic book history, rarely remembered, rarely seen, but Basil Wolverton’s status as an important figure in humor cartooning is unimpeachable. Thus, anybody wanting to understand the development of the medium and the evolution of comedy cartooning should pick up Culture Corner to see how Wolverton began the road to comic book legend. Most of the strips have never been seen by today’s readers, and the sheer number of unpublished penciled sketches makes this book a true rarity and a must-have." – Michael C. Lorah, Newsarama

Newave! The Underground Mini Comix of the 1980s

Review: "I can honestly say that the further we dive into the murky depths of Newave!, the better it gets. Hot on the heels of all the anarchic fun of the first thirty mini comics, come ten more that show, in various ways, a little extra sophistication in content or execution." – Avoid the Future continues their mini-reviews of the contents of Newave! The Underground Mini Comix of the 1980s; this is from part 4, and I think we may have missed linking to part 2 and part 3

King of the Flies Vol. 1: Hallorave

Plugs: Rick Klaw, a.k.a. The Geek Curmudgeon, on It Was the War of the Trenches: "Considering this book's reputation and the fact that the previous two Tardi reprints from Fantagraphics both made their way into my top five books of 2009 listing, I'm eager to read this one"; Newave! The Underground Mini Comix of the 1980s: "An impressive collection with an abundance of Texas contributors!"; and King of the Flies Vol. 1: Hallorave: "I'll admit to ignorance regarding this graphic novel and its creators. But with an intriguing story description, beautiful art, and Fantagraphics' extraordinary track record of offering quality works, I'm looking forward to diving into this one."

Locas II: Maggie, Hopey & Ray

Plug: At IdeaFixa, Claudio Yuge says that reading Love and Rockets "was one of the best things I ever did in life and I recommend it for anyone who likes comics and graphic arts in general." (translated from Portuguese)

Eisner Award Nominee Seal

Commentary: Comic Book Galaxy's Christopher Allen & Alan David Doane comment on this year's Eisner nominees, of which we have several; there's too much for me to quote from here

Weathercraft

Interview: Comic Book Resources' Shaun Manning talks to Jim Woodring about Weathercraft: "In a lot of ways, Manhog is the most interesting character in the Unifactor. He has the most potential for change and the widest range of dramatic possibilities. Besides, it's fun to put him in awful circumstances and watch him suffer. There's something about a big fat guy screaming in terror that's just naturally funny. Oliver Hardy got a lot of mileage out of that formula."

Mome Vol. 8 - Summer 2007

Interview: The Inkstuds radio programme talks with Mome contributor (and, now, kids-comics superstar) Eleanor Davis

Daily OCD: 4/1/10
Written by Mike Baehr | Filed under Steven WeissmanSethreviewsPeanutsNewaveMichael KuppermanKrazy KatJacques TardiDaily OCDChris WareChip KiddCharles Burnsaudio 1 Apr 2010 5:33 PM

Online Commentary & Diversions:

It Was the War of the Trenches

Review: "There are two types of war stories: war as the great human drama, man accomplishing amazing feats in the most horrible of circumstances, or war as the great human tragedy, the ultimate loss of life without any rhyme or reason.  Tardi’s book fits very firmly into the latter category. ... Ink-soaked and gory, Tardi’s detailed renderings drive home the grotesquery of the war and the ordeal of the young men fighting in it. ...It Was the War of the Trenches creates an aura of loss, regret and terror." – Michael C. Lorah, Newsarama

Newave! The Underground Mini Comix of the 1980s

Interview: Listen to the Inkstuds roundtable on Newave! The Underground Mini Comix of the 1980s with editor Michael Dowers and artists  Mary Fleener, Wayno, and Colin Upton — I haven't tuned in myself yet but apparently there's dirt on the early days of Fantagraphics

The Complete Peanuts 1950-1952 (Vol. 1) [NORTH AMERICA ONLY]

Panel: In the second part of The Comics Journal's presentation of a never-before-published panel discussion between Charles Burns, Chip Kidd, Seth and Chris Ware, moderated by Jeet Heer, that occurred October 29, 2005 at the International Festival of Authors in Toronto, Canada, discussion turns to Peanuts and Krazy Kat

Mean

Appreciation: "There are lots of things to love about [Steven] Weissman: his art (from the kids-who-look-like-middle-aged-people of his early work, to the light, beautiful strokes that characterize his later stuff), his nuanced understanding of what it's actually like to be a kid, his intransigent weirdness. But the thing I've really been digging about him lately is the strangeness of his sound effects." – Ben Owen, Parabasis

Thrizzle

Photo of the week: Now that's some shelf porn
Daily OCD: 3/25/10
Written by Mike Baehr | Filed under Tim HensleySergio PonchioneJim WoodringHo Che AndersonFour Color FearDaniel ClowesDaily OCDBob Fingermanaudio 25 Mar 2010 4:49 PM

Online Commentary & Diversions:

Ghost World [Softcover Edition]

Review: "Ghost World feels like a really apt bit of social history to me now, rather than a piercing look at real life.  I believe it, but I believe it happened, not that it happens, at least not quite this way, at the age shown here. But, what is timeless is the theme that crops up towards the end: the unsettling feeling one gets when contemplating the lurch into adulthood." – Christopher King, Timmy's House of Sprinkles

Wally Gropius

Plugs: The bloggers at Comics And... Other Imaginary Tales comment on our offerings in the current issue of Previews, including Four Color Fear ("This will be awesome!"), Grotesque #4 ("This is a great story with great art and well worth the money"), and Wally Gropius ("The dichotomy between the clean and wholesome lines and the dirtyness of the story is what's pulling me in.")

Jim Woodring - photo: Christina Whiting, Homer News

Profile: Christina Whiting of the Homer News reports on Jim Woodring's current residency at the Bunnell Street Arts Center: "The Bunnell gallery space has been transformed into an exhibition of Woodring's art and into a working studio. His work table is covered with pads of paper, bottles of ink, quill pens and unfinished drawings — basic tools of his trade. ... Throughout the month, Woodring also has been working on a 100-page graphic novel, which he plans to publish. The first 20 pages are currently displayed in the gallery exhibit area, and he is adding a new page to the wall every couple of days. 'I'll likely create ten new pages while I'm here,' Woodring said."

Sand & Fury: A Scream Queen Adventure

Interview: At The Comics Journal, Alex Dueben talks to Ho Che Anderson about his new book Sand & Fury: "I’ve always been highly, highly influenced by movies, as much if not more so than comics. There were certainly comic book influences on S&F, like Richard Sala’s work and also Richard Corben whom I’m a big fan of, and even a little Jason Lutes though it’d be difficult to see. But it’s true that the majority of the influences were cinematic, particularly Dario Argento and David Lynch."

Marc Maron & Bob Fingerman

Interview: Bob Fingerman (right) & comedian Marc Maron (left) chat it up on Marc's WTF podcast

Daily OCD: 3/24/10
Written by Mike Baehr | Filed under reviewsMonte SchulzJordan CraneJasonDaily OCDBasil WolvertonaudioAbstract Comics 24 Mar 2010 4:25 PM

Online Commentary & Diversions:

The Culture Corner

Review: "Reading this book was like unearthing a trunkload of old baby pictures… if the babies in question would eventually grow up to become Mad Magazine and Rat Fink. ...[L]ike a Buddy Holly song on an oldies station or WWII-era tattoo flash, some art just stands the test of time and becomes classic. Basil Wolverton’s Culture Corner is a one-of-a-kind work and definitely falls into that category. [Grade: A]" – Chad Derdowski, Mania

Almost Silent

Review: "For some time now, Norwegian cartoonist Jason has been on my shortlist of recommended artists for the uninitiated. ... The next question, naturally, is: which Jason book to start with? Almost Silent... fits the bill perfectly. ... This is the output of an artist with a clear vision who is truly at the top of his game. ... Beautifully bound and reasonably priced, you’re not going to find a much better entry point into the world of contemporary graphic novels than Almost Silent." – Brian Heater, The Daily Cross Hatch

The Last Lonely Saturday [Hardcover Ed.]

Review: "...The Last Lonely Saturday [is] pretty much the best love story in comics form I've ever come across. ... It's an intelligent, moving, beautiful, terrific little comic." – Sean T. Collins (we linked to this previously when it ran on The Savage Critics but it's worth re-running)

Abstract Comics: The Anthology

Review: "Here’s a book that was initially attractive as an intriguing, if intellectual, curiosity, only to reveal itself in short order as a continually fascinating experience. ... I hope this volume, despite its killer commercial potential, will inspire a second. ...Abstract Comics is the most surprising book of the year." – Rich Kreiner, "Yearlong Best of the Year," The Comics Journal

Interview: Mr. Media's Bob Andelman talks to Monte Schulz about This Side of Jordan: "My dad read the book before he died. He liked Rascal a lot — 'He's such a funny little guy.' He used to tell me I was raising the level of art in the family." Listen via the embedded player above or at this link, or download the MP3

Daily OCD: 3/11/10
Written by Mike Baehr | Filed under The Comics JournalMoto HagioMatt ThornmangaFantagraphics historyDame Darcyaudio 11 Mar 2010 3:17 PM

It's today's Online Commentary & Diversions:

A Drunken Dream and Other Stories - Moto Hagio

Commentary: At Manga Worth Reading, Johanna Draper Carlson comments on our recent manga publishing news, saying "I’m expecting great things."

The Comics Journal #269

Interview: At The Comics Journal, part 3 of Matt Thorn's Moto Hagio interview from TCJ #269

Dame Darcy

Interview: On KBOO Community Radio's "Words and Pictures" program, host S.W. Conser welcomes Dame Darcy for a half-hour chat

Pictopia #3 (Unpublished)

History: At Comics Comics, Jeet Heer gives a brief overview and critical commentary on Fantagraphics anthologies throughout the years: "Any complete history of Fantagraphics will have to tell the story of how they slowly learned to put together interesting anthologies."

Daily OCD: 3/9/10
Written by Mike Baehr | Filed under Steven WeissmanreviewsPortable GrindhouseNewaveMichael KuppermanJacques BoyreauEsther Pearl WatsonDaily OCDaudio 9 Mar 2010 3:12 PM

Another day's worth of Online Commentary & Diversions:

Portable Grindhouse: The Lost Art of the VHS Box

Review: "...[Portable Grindhouse] is a nice book to have on the shelf, particularly for folks who love movies and are interested in how design has changed over the years. If you still spend time wandering around video stores looking for the weird and wonderful, check this book out." – Syung Myung Me, Kittysneezes

Newave! The Underground Mini Comix of the 1980s

Review: "I love this book. I'm probably biased because I was a newave cartoonist and I was lucky enough to have two pages included (78 & 79) in this little slice of comix history. ... The overall quality of the material is very high. ... It's a beautiful volume with production values far more impressive than the original comix it reprints. ... Newave! is a wonderful sampler of what the mini comix of the 1980s where all about. ... Now, at last, Michael Dowers and Fantagraphics have brought those little-known 8-pagers out into the light and given them an appropriate place in comix history." – Richard Krauss, Comic Related

Unlovable Vol. 1

Review: "Esther Pearl Watson's Unlovable leaves me breathless and with sore abs from laughter. What a great work out." – Brett Von Schlosser, via Facebook

Chocolate Cheeks

Interview: On The Comix Claptrap podcast, hosts "Thien and Rina get to talk to Harvey Award-winning and Ignatz-nominated, Steven 'Ribs' Weissman who has a new book out with Fantagraphics Books called Chocolate Cheeks. In this interview, Steven talks about the origin of the Yikes! gang, shares his insight on juggling comics-making with having a family, and discusses his web comics "Barack Hussein Obama" and his contributions to the 'What Things Do' comics website. We also try, in vain, to get more LA cartoonist gossip."

The Best Show on WFMU - Michael Kupperman

Do-gooding: Once again Michael Kupperman is lending his talents to the annual WFMU pledge drive; Robot 6's Sean T. Collins has all the details

Things to see: 2/22/10
Written by Mike Baehr | Filed under Tim LaneTim HensleyThings to seeSteven WeissmanSteve BrodnerRenee FrenchLove and RocketsLilli CarréKevin HuizengaJohnny RyanJim FloraHans RickheitGabrielle BellErnie BushmillerDame Darcyaudio 22 Feb 2010 2:09 PM

Have a look, have a click:

Mining Colony X7170 - Johnny Ryan

Johnny Ryan's latest comic for Vice almost seems like it could be a Prison Pit prequel

Renee French

• Of Renee French's daily drawings, this was an easy one to choose to feature after it thoroughly heebied my jeebies

Steve Brodner

Steve Brodner illustrates some recent news items that would have Orwell spinning in his grave — and Orwell spinning in his grave for good measure

Beast Biplane - Kevin Huizenga

• A bit of Ted May fan art by Kevin Huizenga

Witches Song - Dame Darcy

Dame Darcy is having another print sale/painting raffle (that's the painting above; the print is different), and also taking commissions for wedding invitations — all this and more on her latest blog update

Disc Digest - Jim Flora

A 1946 illustration by Jim Flora

NYT illustration - Lilli Carré

Sunday's New York Times featured 4 illustrations by Lilli Carré (via her blog)

Nancy & Sluggo

• Hey Mike Sterling & Nat Gertler, can we use this image in all of our advertisements forever and ever?

Ectopiary, page 12 - Hans Rickheit

Page 12 of Hans Rickheit 's Ectopiary

mural by Hans Rickheit

• Speaking of Hans, he painted a couple of murals in his old house

Torn Curtain - Tim Hensley

• More adventures with Alfred Hitchcock by Tim Hensley: Torn Curtain, Topaz, The Man Who Knew Too Much

Secret Love - Steven Weissman

• More cats-n-Proverbs from Steven Weissman

Lucky - Gabrielle Bell

Happy New Year 2009 from Gabrielle Bell

• A "Thing to hear": Tim Lane presents the first of the pseudo-"radio dramas" produced to accompany his next book, Folktales

Daily OCD: 2/19/10
Written by Mike Baehr | Filed under Steven WeissmanreviewsPortable GrindhouseMichael KuppermanJacques BoyreauDaily OCDaudio 19 Feb 2010 2:24 PM

Online Commentary & Diversions, now with images... what am I, nuts?? At least it's a short one:

Chocolate Cheeks

Review: "If sound effects like 'SNEEZEBLOOD!!' or prayer fights make you laugh, Chocolate Cheeks by Steven Weissman is definitely up your alley. More than that, Weissman’s fantastic art is worth giving this collection a look even if you haven’t read previous 'Yikes' books." (Rating: 4.5 out of 5 stars) – Chad Nevett, Comic Book Resources

Portable Grindhouse: The Lost Art of the VHS Box

Plug: "If you are feeling nostalgic for the days of scanning shelves full of well worn VHS tapes at your local video store, I recommend Portable Grindhouse: The Lost Art of the VHS Box." – Modcult

Sarcastic Voyage podcast - Michael Kupperman

Interview: Michael Kupperman sits down for an hour-long chat with the excellently-named Sarcastic Voyage podcast

Daily OCD: 2/18/10
Written by Mike Baehr | Filed under Roger LangridgePaul HornschemeierDaily OCDaudio 18 Feb 2010 3:49 PM

Shorty Online Commentary & Diversions:

Interview: Paul Hornschemeier reports on his blog: "I sat down with Brandon Wetherbee of the You, Me, Them, Everybody podcast to skip across topics such as mystery novels, crayons, Curt Swan, Robert Crumb, District 9, sock garters, Pixar, syndicated cartoons, Spider-Man, touring with bands, and facial moisturizer. A good time was had by all in a tiny room."

Profile: Portuguese blog Mania dos Quadradinhos looks at the Fantagraphics work of Roger Langridge (autotranslation)