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Category >> misc

Bailey/Coy: Fantagraphics Salutes You
Written by Eric Reynolds | Filed under misc 3 Nov 2009 12:35 PM

  

The landscape for literature in Seattle took a major turn for the uglier yesterday when news leaked that the venerable indie bookstore Bailey/Coy, a mainstay on Seattle's Capitol Hill for 26 years, would be closing at the end of the month. This might be the single most alarming sign I've seen yet in regard to the future of independent bookstores and publishers. If the most literate neighborhood in the most literate city in the country can't support a great store like Bailey/Coy, it makes me think we're all doomed. We will greatly miss B/C, a longtime supporter of Fantagraphics and home to numerous Fanta events over the last 19 years or so. One of the only downsides to opening up our own retail space almost three years ago is that I haven't had the opportunity to work with B/C owner Michael Wells as much as I'd like the last few years, but I've always been grateful that he's never been nothing but encouraging and enthusiastic about us opening our own space. He's one of the true class acts in this racket and his store's closing will make the culture of Capitol Hill and Seattle that much less vibrant. If you're in Seattle, go do some early Christmas shopping at B/C, as the store will shut its doors at the end of this month.

Above image: One of the handbills for one of the seemingly dozens of successful Ellen Forney events that B/C hosted over the years.  

The Glenn Beck Diaper Mask
Written by Eric Reynolds | Filed under misc 20 Oct 2009 9:09 AM

Courtesy Ethan Persoff. Happy Halloween!

Random Comics Quote of the Day
Written by Eric Reynolds | Filed under misc 12 Aug 2009 9:06 AM

  

Paul McCartney on "illegitimate" artforms, in discussing the forthcoming Beatles Rock Band: "Rock 'n' roll, or the Beatles, started as just sort of hillbilly music, just a passing phase, but now it's revered as an art form because so much has been done in it. Same with comics, and I think same with video games." From the New York Times. What graphic novels do you think Paul McCartney reads?!?

New Forbidden Planet website
Written by Eric Reynolds | Filed under misc 16 Jul 2009 1:04 PM

  

Our pals at Forbidden Planet NYC have launched a very nice new website that alt comix fans will enjoy, whether to scope out everything available from Fantagraphics, or to check out what just might be the most extensive zine/minicomic collection on the web since USS Catastrophe "downsized". Jason Miles and I checked out FP on our trip to BEA in June and the small press section, curated by Austin English, was truly non pareil

Uh, what?
Written by Eric Reynolds | Filed under misc 14 Jul 2009 6:24 AM
 Go here for the latest in random, nonsensical unlicensed merchandise. 
Breaking News: I dunno about Batman...
Written by Eric Reynolds | Filed under misc 8 Jul 2009 11:08 AM

... but apparently Robin is not gay. 

Via SLOG. Only two weeks to go until Comicon!

UPDATE: No, actually they are gay. False alarm. Sorry about that!

  

 

Fantasy Eisnerball
Written by Eric Reynolds | Filed under misc 9 Apr 2009 1:08 PM

Every year during the baseball season, when the All-Star teams are announced, some beat writer will put together a team of non All-Stars that could potentially rival the quality of the actual All-Stars. To that end, here's my non-Eisner Nominee Fanta Heavy Hitter starting line-up for 2009, with their non-nominated 2008 books in paretheses:

Gilbert Hernandez (Love & Rockets: New Stories #1)

Jaime Hernandez (Love & Rockets: New Stories #1)

Steve Ditko (or Blake Bell, for Strange & Stranger)

Michael Kupperman (Tales Designed to Thrizzle #4)

Bob Levin (Most Outrageous)

E.C. Segar (Popeye V. 3)

Tim Lane (Abandoned Cars)

Daniel Clowes (Ghost World: Special Edition)

Charles M. Schulz (Complete Peanuts)

Johnny Ryan (Angry Youth Comics #14)

Okay, so there's ten of 'em, but somebody's gotta pitch. I gotta stop there or I'll selfishly fill up the bench and bullpen with MOMEsters and Ignatz folk.

Comics All Destroyed
Written by Eric Reynolds | Filed under misc 8 Apr 2009 9:37 AM

I stumbled across a copy of Jeff Levine's old Destroy All Comics zine from 1996 and was re-reading a classic interview with Drawn & Quarterly Publisher Chris Oliveros, which contained the following exchange that was interesting to me insofar as it underscored just how much has changed in the world of comics in a little over a decade: 

Q: Do you think it's possible that there could be more work in the future where the artist could sit and draw for two years, and release the entire story, or do you think just the way the industry is set up, and with history on the side of the periodical nature of comics...

Oliveros: I think the periodical approach is a good thing. In order for comics to be released in book form, where an author would take two or three or five years to complete this novel, the medium would have to attain this sort of popularity you have in general fiction, where you have fifty or a hundred thousand readers, and your best-sellers have five hundred thousand readers, where because you have this guaranteed income, you can get this advance from a publisher of, I don't know fifty or one hundred thousand dollars, and then you can afford to work on just your own project for a couple years. That obviously will never come to be in comics, so I think, for better or worse we're left with this set-up we have here, where the work is gradually being serialized, which in turn allows the author to collect a royalty on those issues. Without that, comics just wouldn't exist. Whether you like it or not, it allows these works to exist, and it allows the author to make some kind of living while the story is being produced. 

Mind you, I would have agreed entirely with Oliveros at the time. And in a lot of ways, I think it still underscores a fundamental challenge facing publishers vis a vis the increasing inevitability of graphic novels supplanting periodicals as the chosen format.  

The Greatest Introduction...
Written by Eric Reynolds | Filed under misc 8 Apr 2009 8:41 AM

... I've ever read to a Fantagraphics submission:

My name is [*], and I'm a long haul truck driver. I gave college a try several years ago, and when I started, I bought me a laptop computer. 

The whole letter is almost as good, and I can't help but read it in Sam Elliott's voice.  

  

* Name omitted to protect the innocent 

Attn. Emerald City Con Alien Autopsy Fetishists
Written by Eric Reynolds | Filed under misc 2 Apr 2009 8:21 PM

From this week's STRANGER...