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Category >> office fun

In Love with Our Books
Written by Jen Vaughn | Filed under office fun 14 Feb 2014 3:10 PM

Ben's kid 
There's no greater love in the world (to us) than a good book. You can enjoy it on the bus, in the bath tub, while eating Cheez Whiz straight from the can and drinking a nice glass of Bordeaux (not OR there -- and).  Here are a few of you enjoying and loving our books from the last year (and then some). Above, cartoonist Ben Cohen's daughter reads from The Frank Book by Jim Woodring

Bea 
Above, Little Bea read's Good Dog by Graham Chaffee. Gotta say, a lot of dogs seem to love Graham Chaffee's latest graphic novel so you may want to buy a copy not just for yourself but for the dog in your life. Although, most mutts believe that the FBI Mini Bad Dog is more their speed.

Bad DogMeanwhile, Annie Koyama enjoys the HELL out of Beta Testing the Apocalypse by Tom Kaczynski.

Annie Koyama

Noah Van Sciver (of The Hypo) admitted the other day that he reads Buddy Does Seattle a lot. Like A LOT A LOT. Makes sense to me!

Noah Van Sciver and Marigold's butt 
Sam Marx, organizer and head volunteer of both SPX and Linework NW, also digs Buddy Does Seattle.

Sam Marx 
UK cartoonist Joe Decie just HAPPENED to be reading the really cool and sold out Zero Zero by Al Columbia. ;)

Joe Decie 
Ladies, Ladies, Gentlemen, calm yourselves. Sirako from Mexico enjoys the noir tale that is Lost Cat by Jason.

Sirako 
Here Rocky (who hails along with his owner David from the UK) enjoys his favorite book in the Love and Rocket series: Penny Century by Jaime Hernandez!  Rocky 
Human Damon Gentry (writer of Sabretooth Swordsman) failed to follow directions and is EATING instead of READING his favorite book, The Frank Book by Jim Woodring

Damon Gentry 
Cartoonist Jess Underhill  enjoys the Love and Rockets Companion book!

Jess
Jordan Shiveley of Grimalkin Press and Autoptic gets some good reading done from Drawing Power!

Jordan 
Jamie S. Rich and cat, Sadie, drink in some Violenzia by Richard Sala via comiXology! 

Jamie S. Rich
There must be something in the water in Portland, Joe Keatinge 's pup Blackjack is ALSO a big digital Violenzia fan.

 Blackjack

Next up, Loverboy the rabbit bends an ear and his eyes to Julio's Day by Gilbert Hernandez.

Loverboy 
Fantagraphics Marketing Director Mike Baehr enjoys a LARGE BOOK night at home with Captain Easy Book 4 by Roy Crane!

Mike Baehr 
Editor Kristy Valenti reads and rereads Pretty in Ink by Trina Robbins (Valenti edited and wrote the last chapter).

Kristy Valenti 
I always take the time for TWO Charles Forsman books, Celebrated Summer and The End of the Fucking World.

Jen Vaughn/Chuck Forsman 

Each page turn is a lovely as a meaningful glance across the room or a bite of the lip in anticipation. A good comic will always stay with you. Thanks for loving our books as much as we do! 













New Hire at Fantagraphics
Written by Jen Vaughn | Filed under office funJasonarbitrary cuteness 10 Jun 2013 3:30 PM

Wanda and Lost Cat

We have a new co-worker here at Fantagraphics, her name is Wanda, she's roommates with Jacq and Tony and she's into comics. She's particularly excited about Lost Cat by Jason

Wanda and Lost Cat

Although, she DID protest at this photo because she couldn't read the book. Okay, okay, Wanda. 

Wanda and Lost Cat

There ya go. Jason comics are page-lickingly good, aren't they!

Jodelle Door
Written by Jen Vaughn | Filed under staffoffice funlife imitates comicslibraryGuy Peellaertart 18 Feb 2013 11:36 AM

Jodelle Library Door

As a recent thank you to Publisher Kim Thompson and editor Kristy Valenti (and more) for moving offices, I hatched up a scheme to paint the library door in our basement. If you haven't visited the Fantagraphics office recently, the lovely 70s shag carpet was ripped up awhile ago leaving the basement aesthetics a bit similar to that of a cattle kill floor. NO LONGER!

Jodelle cover

Inspired by Guy Peellaert's smashingly neon art in Jodelle, Office Manager Steph Rivers and I pulled out the carbon paper to adapt the drawing to our door. Also called graphite paper and available at art or architecture stores, it is an invaluable tool for mural making or large scale painting projects.

Blank Door  Jodelle door

And then we let the Vitamin-C-infused paint hit the door. Now our library door matches the library door in Jodelle! Steph on the left as I sneakily took a photo. 

Steph Rivers and Jen Vaughn

The finished product may have worked too well. Now everyone at the office wants a new door. Maybe a Graham Chaffee one or Johnny Ryan....

Finished Jodelle Door

Now time to paint all the book spines to match the ones in this library. Mwuhahahaha!

Jodelle Library

Your Last Minute Valentines
Written by Jen Vaughn | Filed under office funNate NealMoto HagioLinda MedleyJohnny RyanJoe DalyJasonGary PanterEsther Pearl WatsonDame DarcyCarol Tyler 14 Feb 2013 12:36 PM

Prison Pit 4

Hey, you're a busy person. We get that. Or maybe you and your sweetie boo said you weren't doing anything but then you found a six pack of that craft brew you love so much or the full Battlestar Galactica series on DVD waiting for you. Well, we've got some cards for you to print out fast at work, while everyone is reading the cards their moms mailed to the office. They aren't going to save you but its better than handing someone a Slim Jim you bent in the shape of a heart while filling up your car at the gas station. Or is it? (Valentine above uses panels from Prison Pit 4 by Johnny Ryan)

The Heart of Thomas

The Heart of Thomas by Moto Hagio

Castle Waiting

Castle Waiting Vol. 1 by Linda Medley

Meat Cake

Meat Cake by Dame Darcy

Dame Darcy Poison

more Meat Cake by Dame Darcy

Dal Tokyo

Dal Tokyo by Gary Panter

Unlovable

Unlovable Vol. 1 by Esther Pearl Watson

Unlovable

Unlovable Vol. 2 by Esther Pearl Watson

Sanctuary

Sanctuary by Nate Neal

Athos in Amerca

Athos in America by Jason

You'll Never Know 3

You'll Never Know Book 3: A Soldier's Heart by Carol Tyler

Dungeon Quest 3

Dungeon Quest 3 by Joe Daly. Click here and here to download this print-worthy PDFs and hand a Valentine to someone. Anyone, man.

Get in Shape with TCJ 302
Written by Jen Vaughn | Filed under The Comics JournalstaffRoy Craneoffice funmaurice fucking sendakcomics journal 8 Feb 2013 10:37 AM

TCJ 302 workout

So for the next month or so people will tell you all the reasons why you should read The Comics Journal #302. It has the last interview with Maurice Sendak, an amazing How to Draw section with Roy Crane and his ghost artist (it's worth at least one semester of comic book school credit), a tribute to Dylan Williams, an extensive interview with Jacques Tardi, a new Joe Sacco comic, a Percy Crosby examination and so much more. But I'm here to tell you how you could use TCJ 302 to sweat. At 672 pages, this tome is not just a brick of knowledge, it's a heavy-ass brick of knowledge.

I work out

While the matte cover could potentially soak up a lot of sweat, wrist bands and occasionally toweling yourself will keep your TCJ 302 fighting fit. 

TCJ workout   The single arm row is a great workout for your back. Kneeling over a chair or bench, place one knee and hand on it. Hold TCJ 302 in other arm fully extended towards the ground. With your back parallel to the ground, slowly bring the book up to your midsection and then return to the starting position. Remember to keep your back still as you shakily lift up TCJ 302

  Now the triceps are a problem area for most Americans. Standing completely straight, feet planted firmly hip-width apart on the floor, start with your TCJ 302 in your hand extended straight up in the air. Using not gravity or momentum but your own muscles, bend your elbow and slowly bring your forearm behind your head. If you do this move too fast, you might get a papercut on your ear as the pages flip around a bit. Make sure not to move your elbow or upper arm. Then return your arm to the fully extended position. Feel free to place your free hand on your hip or wrap it around your face to cradle your elbow to ensure it doesn't dip down during the rep.

  Now, some of you think you can just read TCJ 302 on the bus or in bed without any training or conditioning. Unless you want a repeat of the late 90s-2000s "Harry Pottered Nose" or to generations before that "Unabridged Les Mis" we suggest you read sitting upright until you've conditioned your forearms to proper reading strength. Be alert and well-hydrated while reading.

Workouts hurt

Now don't think I've forgotten about cardio!  Run your usual one mile, three miles, sprints or what have you, but while holding TCJ 302 and imagining Maurice Sendak's mischievous beasts breathing down your neck. For added horror, run while holding the TCJ 302 above your head.

TCJ 302 beasts

Some of you might be cartoonists yourselves who have a love of history, the craft and critical analysis. Bully for you! This excersize will whip your arm into shape. Strap TCJ 302 onto your drawing arm and work on your 1000 pages of bad comics until the good ones show up (per Dave Sim's advice). Soon you'll be one-arm push upping your way to glorious two-page spreads and switching from nib to brush to tech pen with the greatest of ease.

Cartoonist work out!

Enjoy your workout and enjoy The Comics Journal #302.

Blind Date with a Book
Written by Jen Vaughn | Filed under office funmiscellanylife imitates comicslibrary 31 Jan 2013 1:35 PM

Blind date books

Based on a rather amazing idea from libraries, we decided to let some of our books go through the liberating process of not being judged by their covers or names. Some books were even happy enough to be photographed with their descriptions. Click on each description to see what book you should take home tonight. The ones up top describe themselves as quiet, a little gloomy, likes the beauty of little things and Looking for something longterm, family is important, likes punk rock.

Blind date, take me

This book listed itself as a book that likes the outdoors, clothing optional, plays guitar, has a 'green' thumb.

Blind date, fix me!

Recovering from a bad break up, doesn't want kids, likes to travel

Pick this blind date book!

Mischievous, doesn't like hippies, tells a lot of jokes

Blind date book and cuppa joe!

These books are great to read at home in bed, on the train, and even at a coffeeshop with a drink like this book that describes itself as rather powerful, into birds/birch, has 2 daughters.

Some of the books were too shy to be photographed, felt they had bad handwriting but we don't discriminate! Here are their descriptions:

Likes sociology (especially into the downfalls of civilizations), collaborates often, in a complicated relationship

Has a lot of friends from all over, currently homeless unless you count a ship, goal-oriented

Likes to play and talk to guitar, from a small town

Kinda famous, likes to write and draw, into the grotesque (or the plain and simple truth)

History buff, believes in fighting for what's right, has a strong stomach

Already has a special someone...did my nephews put me up to this?

Find a book you like today!

I'll make you Blind Date book

Loves Metal and power violence, into self-defense, likes it rough

Fantagramming
Written by Jen Vaughn | Filed under staffoffice funmiscellany 26 Jan 2013 9:48 AM

Instragram

Just an FYI that we did indeed join another social media outlet for your enjoyment. Find us on Instagram as 'Fantagraphics' for more photos of your favorite books getting made, panels galore and my new favorite game 'count the razor blades found on the office floor.' While we can guarantee no brunch photos — unless someone makes us that Cannibal Fuckface waffle iron we've been wanting, we've got some mangy cats who love to pose with our books. Well anyway, it'll be some no filter fun and we can't wait to see how many of you like our photos from your workplace elevators and bathrooms. Follow Barnaby's advice and double-time it today.

Daily OCD 11/21/12
Written by Jen Vaughn | Filed under staffOlivier Schrauwenoffice funNoah Van SciverNico VassilakisMoto HagioLorenzo MattottiLinda MedleylibraryJaime HernandezJacques TardiJack JacksonFlannery OConnorDaily OCDCrag HillChris WrightCharles Burns 21 Nov 2012 2:52 PM

The strongest umbrella in the wind of Online Commentaries & Diversions: 

The Last Vispo

• Review: Paul Constant of The Stranger looks at The Last Vispo: Visual Poetry 1998-2008, edited by Nico Vassilakis and Crag Hill. "As an art book, it demands hours of investigation. . . For those linguistic pioneers looking to find the future of fiction, this could be one of the most informative poetry anthologies to be published in the new millennium."

Adele Blanc-Sec

• Review: NPR's My Guilty Pleasure looks at the Jacques Tardi graphics novels of Adèle Blanc-Sec who is "young writer with the brains of Sherlock Holmes, the body of Angelina Jolie and the stoic fortitude of the Marlboro Man." Rosecrans Baldwin states, "The books are part adventure comic, part hardboiled fiction. They're terrific whodunits that conjure up all the precise atmospheric detail of, say, a Georges Simenon novel, but with twice the plot."

The Crackle of the Frost

• Review: The Crackle of the Frost makes NPR's Graphic Novels that Fell Under the Radar of 2012 list. Glen Weldon states, "it's Mattotti's breathtakingly vivid paintings, pulsating with the mysterious poetry of unsettling dreams, that add a welcome and indelible splash of Kafka and Murakami."

Blacklung

• Review: Blacklung by Chris Wright gets reviewed on Nerds of a Feather. Philippe Duhart says, "Wright’s genius is further evident in his ability to use these aberrant cartoonish characterizations to convey human emotion, particularly terror. Wright’s portrayal of violence is stark and chilling – despite or perhaps because of his singular style. . . Black Lung worked on all counts. Plus, pirates."

• Review (video): Kapow Comics down in Australia reviews Chris Wright's Blacklung. Al states "this is a complicated book with musings on philosophy, literature, mortality and especially, religion has a big focus." Sonya says, "Every single character changes in this story, their journey changes them . . . [Blacklung] prayed on my mind. It lingers with you."

Flannery O'Connor: The Cartoons

• Review: Glen David Gold looks at Flannery O'Connor: The Cartoons edited by Kelly Gerald in the LA Review of Books. In an attempt to see how the bread is made, Gold, "Cartooning was O'Connor's first artistic passion. . . . An article in the local paper and a pile of rejection slips from The New Yorker indicate how serious she was. . . not an early blush of Flannery the fiction writer at work. But I'd still recommend it to the curious. Come at it without expecting same genius, but look at it because it's an extreme close up of biography."

Los Tejanos and Lost Cause

• Review: Publishers Weekly looks at Jack Jackson's Los Tejanos and Lost Causes. "Comics’ current vogue for nonfiction was pioneered in these two works from the late underground comix founding father Jackson, who died in 2006. Jackson brought an R. Crumb–style crosshatching and love of facial grotesquery to these two densely researched historical graphic novels."

The Heart of Thomas

• Plug: Publishers Weekly and Ada Price show a sneak peak of The Heart of Thomas by Moto Hagio. Enjoy 14 pages of pure genius but don't forget to read each one right to left! We're talking manga here.

The Hypo

• Review: Rob Clough of The Comics Journal enjoys The Hypo by Noah Van Sciver."he’s made a fairly significant leap as both a draftsman and a storyteller in a relatively short period of time . . . Van Sciver’s greatest achievement in this book is his storytelling restraint. He lets his cross-hatching gets across the grime . . He wants to show the reader a different side of the Lincoln we grew up reading about in the history books, but also wants the reader to connect this younger man to the future president."

Castle Waiting Vol. 1

• Review: Fantasy Literature takes a peek at Castle Waiting Vol. 1 by Linda Medley and Ruth Arnell is in love. "the charming ink illustrations have a piquant charming quality that match the story wonderfully. . . Linda Medley has written a gentle feminist fairy tale comic book that truly deserves to have a wider audience."
 
Black Hole
 
• Review: Sonia Harris of Comics Book Resources reads Black Hole by Charles Burns all in one sitting, one evening. "Reading Black Hole all at once in a nice, tidy bundle, it is impossible to experience what Black Hole was for all those years while it was slowly seeping out, issue by issue.  . .  it is visceral poetry, a true expression of the medium with imagery and words working together to create the most intimate impact. Black Hole is beautiful and terrible, it is a treasure."

Jaime Hernandez

• Interview: Antonio Solina of Italian site Lo Spazio Bianco interviews with Jaime Hernandez .

Brooklyn Comics and Graphics Festival The Man Who Grew His Beard

• Commentary: On the Brooklyn Comics and Graphics Festival, Coming Books are Burning in Hell talk non-stop about the mystery cartoonist that is Olivier Schrauwen of The Man Who Grew His Beard. BCGF coverge by The Beat (Heidi) describes the Olivier Schrauwen exhibit and Hannah Means-Shannon on the panels. Julia Pohl-Miranda from Drawn and Quarterly snaps a pic of me and former intern Anna hard at work (and pretty hot, you can see our sweat)

• Commentary: OSU Librarian, Caitlin McGurk, visited the Fantagraphics office and wrote up a nice report on us at the Billy Ireland Cartoon Library and Museum blog!

Suds up Percy Gloom
Written by Jen Vaughn | Filed under office funCathy Malkasianarbitrary cuteness 19 Nov 2012 3:13 PM

 Percy Gloom Soap

Cathy Malkasian thinks we're dirty. What else can we expect when she sends us a box of beautifully-crafted soap? We're working so hard on publishing books; its a sweaty business. To be fair, she sent the box to Eric Reynolds but he is nice and clean enough to share with the rest of us. Each soap is a charcter from Malkasian's 2007 hit, Percy Gloom. Look at those perfectly molded soaps, Percy even has his cute hat on!

Soap
 
Malkasian's next graphic novel is due out in April entitled Wake Up Percy Gloom! S0 get soapy and squeaky clean for the next book. You'll have to pardon me for ending this FLOG! post early, I've got a sudsy, frothy Percy soap face to stick into my sweaty under-arms.
 
Wake Up Percy Gloom


Waffle Days are back!
Written by Jen Vaughn | Filed under staffoffice funinterns 28 Sep 2012 1:08 PM

Waffle by Steph

Waffle days are BACK at Fantagraphics thanks to a hearty group of staffers: Stephanie, Jacq, Kristy, Steph O. and Jen. The waffles proceeded, of course, a staff meeting because we like our sweet AND sour here.

 Ian

Featuring delicious chicken and some heart-shaped vegan waffles, we chowed down with the regular condiments too like Nutella, peanut butter, fruit, whipped cream and good ol' Vermont maple syrup. Ian nibbles in anticipation of that perfect golden brown waffle.

Emory and Tony

Emory and Tony talk turkey (bacon).

Jen Vaughn and Jacq Cohen

Grillmasters Jen and Jacq.

 Nomi

Interns were not locked in the basement as per our usual when free food is around so they frolicked wielding doughy forks and wearing happy grins. WAFFLES ARE BACK.

(Beautiful waffle pic by Steph Haynes. There is no grunge appropriate Instagram filter, yet.) 

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