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Jewish Images in the Comics

$26.99
In print
jewimg

Jewish Images in the Comics showcases more than 150 comic strips, comic books and graphic novels from all over the world, stretching over the last five centuries and featuring Jewish characters and Jewish themes.

The book is divided into chapters on Anti-Semitism, the Old Testament, the Holocaust, Israel, the Golem and much more, featuring everything from well-known comics like Art Spiegelman’s Maus and the work of Will Eisner to much more obscure (and in some cases far less savory) but no less culturally and historically interesting examples of how Jewish culture has been depicted in comics.

As with Strömberg’s previous two books for Fantagraphics, each strip, comic, or graphic novel is spotlighted via a short but informative 200-word essay and a representative illustration. The book is augmented by a context-setting introduction as well as an extensive source list and bibliography.

Jewish Images in the Comics is the third book in a series in which Strömberg examines different phenomena in our society, as mirrored in comics. Black Images in the Comics examines the way Black people have been portrayed in comics and The Comics Go to Hell looks at how the Devil has been used as a comics character.

33-page excerpt (download 1.5 MB PDF):

Video & Photo Slideshow Preview (view in new window):

Praise for Black Images in the Comics:

“The book presents a unique look at the evolution of comics, but it also proves comics to be an effective and sobering lens for viewing the history of racism toward blacks.” – School Library Journal

“As this small but potent book shows, African Americans didn’t fare any better in the comics medium than elsewhere in popular culture. Strömberg’s compact cultural critique encapsulates each of about 100 black comics characters in a brief, single-page essay and a full-page illustration...” – Booklist

Colors:
black & white
Format:
Hardcover
Dimensions:
6" x 6"
ISBN-13:
978-1-60699-528-0

Press Highlights:

"This is a work of tremendous ambition, spanning countries, languages, and artistic styles. It is a definitive reference work, and a subtle reminder that the Jewish people have not only outlived the most venomous anti-Semites, but in the field of comics, replaced them entirely." — The Schmooze

   

Jewish Images in the Comics showcases more than 150 comic strips, comic books and graphic novels from all over the world, stretching over the last five centuries and featuring Jewish characters and Jewish themes.

The book is divided into chapters on Anti-Semitism, the Old Testament, the Holocaust, Israel, the Golem and much more, featuring everything from well-known comics like Art Spiegelman’s Maus and the work of Will Eisner to much more obscure (and in some cases far less savory) but no less culturally and historically interesting examples of how Jewish culture has been depicted in comics.

As with Strömberg’s previous two books for Fantagraphics, each strip, comic, or graphic novel is spotlighted via a short but informative 200-word essay and a representative illustration. The book is augmented by a context-setting introduction as well as an extensive source list and bibliography.

Jewish Images in the Comics is the third book in a series in which Strömberg examines different phenomena in our society, as mirrored in comics. Black Images in the Comics examines the way Black people have been portrayed in comics and The Comics Go to Hell looks at how the Devil has been used as a comics character.

33-page excerpt (download 1.5 MB PDF):

Video & Photo Slideshow Preview (view in new window):

Praise for Black Images in the Comics:

“The book presents a unique look at the evolution of comics, but it also proves comics to be an effective and sobering lens for viewing the history of racism toward blacks.” – School Library Journal

“As this small but potent book shows, African Americans didn’t fare any better in the comics medium than elsewhere in popular culture. Strömberg’s compact cultural critique encapsulates each of about 100 black comics characters in a brief, single-page essay and a full-page illustration...” – Booklist

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