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The Comics Journal #306

$14.99
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This product will be shipped on 10/20/2020

PLEASE NOTE: All pre-ordered books are shipped via Media Mail in the U.S. and Air Mail internationally. Please select the appropriate shipping method when checking out to avoid being overcharged for shipping!

This issue of the award-winning magazine features a career-spanning interview with New Yorker cartoonist Roz Chast, and asks, "Do we still need political cartooning?"

In this issue, Gary Groth interviews Roz Chast, the New Yorker humor cartoonist turned graphic memoirist (Can't We Talk About Something More Pleasant?). TCJ #306 focuses on the intersections between comics and politics. It includes op-eds on the importance (and lack thereof) of modern political cartooning. Also featured is a meditation on the creator of the Dilbert newspaper comic strip, Scott Adams; a piece about Daisy Scott, the first African American woman political cartoonist; a gallery of underground cartoonist John Pound's code-generated comics; portraits of mass shooting victims; a selection of Spider-Gwen artist Chris Vision's sketchbook pages; and other essays and galleries. Full-color illustrations throughout.
Pages:
164
Colors:
full color
Format:
Softcover
Dimensions:
7.66" x 9.75"
ISBN-13:
978-1-68396-353-0
Year:
2020

PLEASE NOTE: All pre-ordered books are shipped via Media Mail in the U.S. and Air Mail internationally. Please select the appropriate shipping method when checking out to avoid being overcharged for shipping!

This issue of the award-winning magazine features a career-spanning interview with New Yorker cartoonist Roz Chast, and asks, "Do we still need political cartooning?"

In this issue, Gary Groth interviews Roz Chast, the New Yorker humor cartoonist turned graphic memoirist (Can't We Talk About Something More Pleasant?). TCJ #306 focuses on the intersections between comics and politics. It includes op-eds on the importance (and lack thereof) of modern political cartooning. Also featured is a meditation on the creator of the Dilbert newspaper comic strip, Scott Adams; a piece about Daisy Scott, the first African American woman political cartoonist; a gallery of underground cartoonist John Pound's code-generated comics; portraits of mass shooting victims; a selection of Spider-Gwen artist Chris Vision's sketchbook pages; and other essays and galleries. Full-color illustrations throughout.
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